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Charging ok?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by modelx007, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. modelx007

    modelx007 Member

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    uploadfromtaptalk1454047041640.jpg

    Hooked up to my craddle point charger which is 20amp. Looks like I'm doing pretty good at 15 miles per hour for 20 amps?
     
  2. rjcbox

    rjcbox Member

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    yes, I get 15mi/hr at 20amps, 30mi/hr at 40amps w/ single charger on NEMA 14-50
     
  3. beingpaulp

    beingpaulp Member

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    you should try and upgrade to a 40A charger, if you get home late (like 11pm) with a 10% charged battery, it will take almost 14 hours to get back to 90% at 20A. It'll be half that at 40A and so the car will be full by 6am (instead of 1pm)

    I think 40A is totally sufficient for most people, which is probably why the std single charger is 40A :)
     
  4. modelx007

    modelx007 Member

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    I actually have a NEMA outlet too. I just wanted make sure my charging at 20 amps is correct as when I charge two Teslas at same time, I can only do 2 x 20 amp chargers I have. When I only charge 1, I can use the NEMA.

    Another thing I find interesting is several people advised to manually dial down the amps on the Tesla. However I was advised on orientation I didn't have to do that and I see the car auto adjusts. Maybe because it's an update production from when everyone else has it?
     
  5. BertL

    BertL Active Member

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    My impression with other recommendations on "dialing down" is really for outlets you don't have confidence or experience with, e.g. RV parks, etc. If their circuit breaker pops in the middle of the night because your MS was trying to draw more than they could really provide, when you get ready to go, you may have insufficient charge. Dialing them down a bit may improve your chances the circuit will keep functioning -- so while it will take a bit longer to get the charge you wanted, your odds of it working improve.

    IMHO, for your home charging situation, don't worry with it. Let your MS handle it all. I do.
     
  6. modelx007

    modelx007 Member

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    Makes sense. Thanks
     
  7. Rocky_H

    Rocky_H Member

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    No, nothing different with more recent versions. There are still several valid reasons for dialing down the current depending on the situation. One or more of them may apply or may not.

    BertL mentioned one—if you have a circuit or connection that’s a little iffy. Lower current may help it continue to work.

    If you are using an external adapter cable to a lower level circuit that the Tesla charging system can’t “see”. If you have the official Tesla 14-50 adapter on your UMC, that is what it goes by to auto-adjust, as the sales person was saying. But if you then have that plugged into a third party adapter cable that switches it to a 14-30 for a dryer outlet, the charging cable and car can’t detect that. They will still think it’s a 14-50 and try to draw 40A from a 30A outlet. That will flip the breaker as a good case if things work as they are supposed to, rather than causing a fire. So you would need to turn down the amps to 24 to be safe for a 30A rated circuit.

    Some people (including me) turn the amps down from the maximum level of their UMC (40) or HPWC (80) to have less stress and heat on those components to extend their reliability and lifetime.

    In your situation, @modelx007, your wall charging unit is built to supply 20A, and tells the car that, so the car auto adjusts to that. It’s probably on a 30A circuit. 20 out of 30 would be about what most wall charging units would be doing with that. So from the 3 examples I mentioned, you have a good connection, it can’t accidentally go over the appropriate level, and you are not pushing at the maximum of a UMC or in-car charger. No reason to turn it down.
     
  8. modelx007

    modelx007 Member

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    Great explanation and makes perfect sense for the dryer.
     

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