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Chevy Bolt Regen vs Tesla

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by jchag, May 1, 2017.

  1. jchag

    jchag Member

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    Bought a Chevy Bolt last month. I used to think My Model S had a strong regen. After driving the Bolt, I'm not sure if the Tesla regen is even on. When I drive the Bolt I never use the brake (for emergencies only). The regen will bring the car to a complete stop. If you need extra regen they have a steering wheel paddle to provide more. I hope Tesla can mimicking the Chevy, but i think I read somewhere the Tesla motor cant regen that well at slower speeds. 1 point for the Bolt
     
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  2. n2mb_racing

    n2mb_racing Member

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    Did they put the regen in the right place finally, on the gas pedal?
     
  3. azred

    azred Member

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    I'm still amazed that anyone would buy that ugly car unless it was priced far below the Model 3, but if it's more technologically advanced then it makes some sense.
     
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  4. jchag

    jchag Member

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    Yes they did. Best regen out there
     
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  5. jchag

    jchag Member

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    I went to buy a Model 3 because I like my S so much and the Supercharger network is a huge selling feature. I looked all around and couldn't find a Model 3. Based on my experience with "Tesla Time" I will have run the Bolt into the ground before a Model 3 is available.
     
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  6. taraquin

    taraquin Member

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    Do you know how many kW the Bolt regens at max capasity if its possible to figure out? Do you drive With "L"?

    I have driven several different Teslas now and the regen differes between batterypacks. It seems 70kW regen is about the max for every model. However, this feels quite different when you compare at TMS 60 that weighs slightly below 2000 kg vs at Model X 90 which weighs several hundred kg more. The regen with my S60 feels like braking hard, but it takes a while to come to a complete stop. With the P90D it braked quite a bit less. With the Model X even less.
     
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  7. ZachShahan

    ZachShahan Member

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    Have you driven the BMW i3? That's the best regen I've experience, but yet to get my butt into a Bolt. I'm curious how the regen on the two compares.
     
  8. McRat

    McRat Active Member

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    Yeah, that regen on the Bolt is A+. It's the new benchmark for everybody else.
     
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  9. Lon12

    Lon12 Member

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    So what your saying is you don't expect the Bolt to last long? ;)
     
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  10. jimmyz80

    jimmyz80 Member

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    It would be interesting to see how Bolt, RWD Tesla, and AWD Tesla all behave when you go from steady state to full regen on something like an icy or gravel covered curve. I wonder if there are big differences in how they handle the loss of traction.
     
  11. Alketi

    Alketi Member

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    Curious, do you need to enable the regen every time you get in the car? Wasn't there some setting that wasn't being saved?
     
  12. jchag

    jchag Member

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    No, what I'm saying is it took Tesla forever to get the Model X out on a chassis they were already using. Getting an entire new car into production will take longer. Oh, and a 2 year wait on deliveries start for anyone reserving today.
     
  13. jchag

    jchag Member

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    No, regen is always active. I drive in the Low mode for stronger regen.
     
  14. jdbob

    jdbob Member

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    There are two forward "gear" settings on many EV's and PHEV's. D usually simulates an automatic transmission as far as lifting off the throttle. L or B (depending on the model) is the high regen setting. It's not a touchscreen setting like on the Tesla, it's the "gear" selector that determines the regen.
     
  15. jchag

    jchag Member

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    No I haven't. Ive driven the Fiat, Spark, Leaf, Volt, Tesla S.
     
  16. taraquin

    taraquin Member

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    Do you know how many kW the Bolt regens at max capasity if its possible to figure out? Do you drive With "L"?

    I have driven several different Teslas now and the regen differes between batterypacks. It seems 70kW regen is tabout the max for every model. However, this feels quite different when you compare at TMS 60 that weighs slightly below 2000 kg vs at Model X 90 which weighs several hundred kg more. The regen with my S60 feels like braking hard but it takes a while to come to Complete stop. With the P90D it braked quite a bit less. With the Model X even less.
     
  17. jchag

    jchag Member

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    The dash has a KW meter that goes green when you release the accelerator, but i think you would need more of a consistent environment and actual meters to get an exact answer. I'm just going by feel. Motor Tend has an article that compares Bolt regen and Tesla for stopping distence, but does not calculate power put back in the battery.
     

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  18. BrettS

    BrettS Member

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    Just to preface this, I'm coming from a Prius and I've had my model S for about a month now. But I'm really not sure why the gas pedal is the right place for regen. On the prius as you hit the brake pedal it uses regen first and if you call for more braking than regen can provide it keeps regen on and also applies the 'real' brakes. You hit one pedal to brake and no matter how hard or soft you hit the pedal the car gives you the max regen and also ensures that car is still slowing down as much as you want. With 'one pedal' driving then you get regen as you let off of the gas pedal, but it only provides limited stopping power. If you want to stop faster than regen allows you still need to hit the brake pedal. It's counter intuitive.

    Putting regen on the gas pedal creates two issues. First, is an efficiency problem... it's most efficient in a car to coast, regen is nice in that it recovers some power that would otherwise be lost by braking, but a decent amount of power is lost to heat as it gets transferred back to the battery. If you see a red light coming up in the distance you will save the most energy by coasting (no power applied to the wheels and no regen happening) as soon as you see the red light... if the light turns green before you get there, then hit the gas again and you won't have lost any power to heat. If the light is still red when you get there then you will be going slower than if you kept applying power to the wheels and you will still need to brake, but you will lose much less energy than if you had to brake at a higher speed. Of course it's still possible to coast in a one pedal configuration, but you need to hold your foot on the pedal the whole time and keep it pressed down just enough to prevent regen from kicking in and still not provide power to the wheels. It's much easier if you can just keep your feet off of both pedals if you don't want to apply power to the wheels or regen.

    The second issue I see is a psychological one. If people get used to driving with one pedal (especially if the one pedal can bring the car to a full stop) then I'm afraid that in an emergency situation people won't think to actually hit the brake pedal to stop the car faster. If you get used to lifting your foot off the gas pedal to stop the car and all of a sudden someone pulls out in front of you then your natural reaction is going to be to pull your foot off the gas pedal and not hit the brake and that's not going to slow down the car nearly as fast as stomping on the brake pedal. I'm not sure people like me, who have been driving for 25 years now will ever get out of the habit of stomping on the brake in emergencies, but I think this could be a real problem for new drivers who learn on a 'one pedal' car and rarely, if ever, actually use the 'real' brake pedal.

    I think having one pedal to go and one pedal to stop makes much more sense.
     
  19. Jeff N

    Jeff N Active Member

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    It's been reported by Bolt owners that the driver display shows up to 70 kW of regen at highway speed when the accelerator pedal is fully released and the steering regen paddle is also engaged.
     
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  20. Boatguy

    Boatguy Member

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    I can understand how you arrived at this conclusion, but it's a misplaced concern. Everyone who drives an EV with the regen on the "go" pedal adapts very very quickly and loves it. And nobody forgets to use the brake pedal to stop the car when needed. My daughter-in-law is from Europe and just got her license here. She was very nervous about driving on the freeways, traffic, etc. She bought an i3 and raves about the regen and ease of driving.

    Yes coasting is efficient, but 99% of the population will never try to squeeze out the last few hundred meters / Wh around town. And in longer distance driving with long downhills (though perhaps not in FL), etc. the car is most likely on cruise control and will automatically adjust the power/regen to maintain the desired speed which inherently implies a lot of coasting if going downhill. I've seen this while driving back from the Sierras.
     
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