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Chill Mode Extending Range?

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
7,659
8,438
Riverside Co. CA
Assuming a similar (gentle) style of driving and accelerating, would using Chill add range over Standard? Has anyone ever tabulated that?

Not any more than driving in the same manner would (not having a heavy foot). Chill mode just forces you to not accelerate quickly, which you can also do by not pushing the pedal down as fast / far.
 

Sam1

Member
Sep 11, 2019
937
840
NV
Assuming a similar (gentle) style of driving and accelerating, would using Chill add range over Standard? Has anyone ever tabulated that?
Yes, I usually get better mileage on the highway for long trips in chill mode.

Assuming it is because with every throttle manipulation, chill mode slow ramps into the power where regular mode is jumpy going up and down. The amount it jumps around is minimal, but when you add it up a few times per second over 100 miles, you do use more power.
 

Gasaraki

Active Member
Oct 21, 2019
1,453
975
Syracuse, NY
Assuming a similar (gentle) style of driving and accelerating, would using Chill add range over Standard? Has anyone ever tabulated that?

No. It doesn't make a difference cause it doesn't change efficiency. All it changes is the throttle response and max power.
 

GtiMart

Member
Nov 13, 2019
648
519
Quebec City, Canada
I'll second what Gasaraki said. It might help you be more gentle on the acceleration, but that doesn't change your efficiency all that much. You are limited to something like 200hp however, maybe that is a more significant impact. My opinion? You're driving slower because you have to press harder on the accelerator for the same power, and driving slower is more efficient.
 

Sam1

Member
Sep 11, 2019
937
840
NV
No. It doesn't make a difference cause it doesn't change efficiency. All it changes is the throttle response and max power.
And if it changes throttle response, it changes efficiency. The fact that you are arguing that exact point, tells me you haven't put much thought into it.

The throttle position moves hundreds of times per second. It's not just when you think in your head it is moving. It is never static. When the throttle reacts 50% faster, there are many more spikes and draws than exist with a slower and smoother reaction. This little graph here is just a random one from the internet not associated with throttle response, but it displays the same thing. The spikes would be driving in regular mode, the median would be driving in chill mode. Those spikes can last milliseconds, but over a long trip, they add up.

jJ4HI.gif
 

Gasaraki

Active Member
Oct 21, 2019
1,453
975
Syracuse, NY
And if it changes throttle response, it changes efficiency. The fact that you are arguing that exact point, tells me you haven't put much thought into it.

The throttle position moves hundreds of times per second. It's not just when you think in your head it is moving. It is never static. When the throttle reacts 50% faster, there are many more spikes and draws than exist with a slower and smoother reaction. This little graph here is just a random one from the internet not associated with throttle response, but it displays the same thing. The spikes would be driving in regular mode, the median would be driving in chill mode. Those spikes can last milliseconds, but over a long trip, they add up.

View attachment 643661
Throttle response is how much power you get from stepping on the peddle. If I normally get 50% power when I step 1" in to the peddle, on chill, I only get 25% at 1 inch. If I leave it in normal mode and I want 25% power, I just step a half inch in to the peddle.

My feet is my throttle response.
 

Sam1

Member
Sep 11, 2019
937
840
NV
Throttle response is how much power you get from stepping on the peddle. If I normally get 50% power when I step 1" in to the peddle, on chill, I only get 25% at 1 inch. If I leave it in normal mode and I want 25% power, I just step a half inch in to the peddle.

My feet is my throttle response.

that's pretty cool, you are so coordinated that you can control your foot to fractions of a mm to ensure there are no spikes that lasts milliseconds.
 
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Sam1

Member
Sep 11, 2019
937
840
NV
Yeah the car jerks around every mm of pedal travel.
a millisecond spike isn't going to cause the car to jerk. Not sure what you're basing your information on, other than an obtuse idea that says "if I can't feel the difference in acceleration, it's not accelerating". Not going to debate this any longer, have a good one.
 

JulienW

Active Member
Jul 7, 2018
2,565
2,783
Atlanta
a millisecond spike isn't going to cause the car to jerk. Not sure what you're basing your information on, other than an obtuse idea that says "if I can't feel the difference in acceleration, it's not accelerating". Not going to debate this any longer, have a good one.
mm=millimeter not (ms) millisecond. The accelerator pedal probably has about 60 to 75mm of travel.
 

Sam1

Member
Sep 11, 2019
937
840
NV
mm=millimeter not (ms) millisecond. The accelerator pedal probably has about 60 to 75mm of travel.
Both of those measurements apply. mm is movement of the pedal, and ms would be the length of the acceleration or deceleration spike.

Thanks for playing, but no soup for you.
 

JulienW

Active Member
Jul 7, 2018
2,565
2,783
Atlanta
Both of those measurements apply. mm is movement of the pedal, and ms would be the length of the acceleration or deceleration spike.

Thanks for playing, but no soup for you.

Gasaraki is referring to the amount of G-force exerted in relation to the distance of pedal press. In Chill mode you must press the pedal farther to get the same amount of G-force.
 
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clyde

Member
Jan 16, 2021
39
18
Cincinnati
The only way to really clear this up is a long-term test of both settings, under conditions that are exceedingly hard to duplicate: real life.
In the meantime, this opinion sticks out for me:
You're driving slower because you have to press harder on the accelerator for the same power, and driving slower is more efficient.
 
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AlexMasters

Member
Mar 14, 2020
66
45
Kingston Upon Thames
Its a different throttle pedal map. The computer doesn't actually vary power to the motor in direct response to throttle position, so no milliseconds power spikes, just a general, smoothed, average position as an indication of how fast you would like to accelerate to to the computer. Drivability would be horrible if there was a direct correlation. Its the same for any fuel injected ICE car
 
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Gasaraki

Active Member
Oct 21, 2019
1,453
975
Syracuse, NY
The only way to really clear this up is a long-term test of both settings, under conditions that are exceedingly hard to duplicate: real life.
In the meantime, this opinion sticks out for me:
Yes. So anyone can drive slower with the normal setting also. We are just saying that driving at 60mph in chill or normal is going to have the same efficiency. Also accelerating slower with your feet in normal will be the same as stomping on it in chill.
 
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Shelburne

Member
Mar 9, 2021
61
33
Shelburne Falls, MA
I think the only way to solve this dispute is to put the car on a dynamometer in the lab and measure the power drain in chill mode and then in standard mode. Anything else is conjecture and/or opinion.
 

GtiMart

Member
Nov 13, 2019
648
519
Quebec City, Canada
It's relatively clear when you understand what chill mode does, it's just that some people don't seem to want to hear it :)
In normal mode, the pedal goes from unpressed = 0hp to fully depressed = 300hp for example. half-pressed might be 150hp, although it's not quite linear.
In chill model, the pedal goes from unpressed = 0hp to fully depressed = 200hp, with the middle point maybe at 75hp? It's also non linear but typically the mapping is made so you really have to press hard to get decent power. Note the maximum available is lower, at 200hp.
How will that affect your consumption? If you put your foot exactly like in normal, you'll go slower. Yes, you should consume (a bit) less. If you press fully, you'll have less power, again yes you'll consume (slightly) less.
Now, if you were always using less than 200hp, and you adjust your foot position to get the same power in both modes, then I state that NO, you won't reduce your consumption.
The max of 200hp in chill mode is the same for a LR AWD and a Performance so the difference from normal mode is ever bigger (400hp, 500hp roughly)
 

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