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Christian Science Monitor: Rise of the Boutique Carmaker

Discussion in 'News' started by tonybelding, Oct 27, 2006.

  1. tonybelding

    tonybelding Active Member

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    A really informative article (as I've come to expect from CSM) that covers not only Tesla Motors, but also has some insights about what direction the automobile industry is heading.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/1027/p12s02-stct.html

    Highlights:

     
  2. asdar

    asdar Member

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    Not a hopeful article for Tesla or the electric car in general.

    I hope this lights a fire under the people that want to prove the analysts wrong.
     
  3. tonybelding

    tonybelding Active Member

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    I didn't read it that way. I mean, we already knew this was a David versus Goliath story -- in that respect the critics are pointing out the obvious.

    However, if you look at this bit:

    That really strikes close to home on most electric car companies. It doesn't bode well for Commuter Cars, or Wrightspeed, or AC Propulsion, etc. Tesla Motors, by comparison, are the ones who seem to have their corporate act together. They're the ones who appear to be thinking about not only the car, but also public relations, service and repairs, a dealer network, all the things that people expect a "real" car company to do.
     
  4. Tesla2Go

    Tesla2Go Member

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    ;D ;D ;D ;D

    I don't see the point in offering the "wisdom" that: there's no point in doing anything, since you're too small to have an effect.

    Mitsubishi, Toyota......their giant wheels are starting to turn. No doubt what Tesla has done and is doing, will increase the big guys motivation :)
     
  5. WarpedOne

    WarpedOne Mainecoon Butler

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    Never mind analysts. All they can do is look at history and extrapolate.

    When did any extrapolation forcasted a revolution? They are only modern fortune-telleres.
     
  6. david_42

    david_42 Member

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    "no, you can't sell them online" There are many billions of dollars that say you can sell online. Certainly, you need physical support, but Tesla is providing that, in part, by restricting the locations where they sell the Roadster. This is the first electric car designed to be sold to people who love cars and driving. These are big city folks, not back-to-landers. Their market target is online with broadband.

    I'm bringing a new consumer product to market, online, no retail at all. It will work because my target market is both connected and concentrated.
     
  7. tonybelding

    tonybelding Active Member

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    And yet, that runs counter to the whole "Amazon.com" philosophy of online sales -- the idea that you can sell to the whole country (or even internationally) without having to build and staff expensive stores everywhere.

    Speaking for myself. . . I am online with broadband, but I am not big city folks. I live way out in the country. When I take my Lotus in to the dealership (in Austin Texas) for service, it's 120 miles there and 120 miles back. It's not fun. I'm not too happy about Texas being outside Tesla's service area. I've got my fingers crossed hoping they'll open a presense here in 2008, or sometime in 2009 at the latest.
     
  8. Michael

    Michael Member

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    I would also argue that selling a vehicle is different than most other items, which can be successfully sold via internet. I strongly doubt that the majority of the public would purchase a vehicle that they couldn't test drive (or even see if they can fit in it comfortably). I know I wouldn't and also don't personally know of anyone that would.

    I also don't think that the majority of the public will accept such limited access to service and repair facilities, which also argues that Tesla should probably have an agreement with a large auto manufacturer or become a subsidiary of a larger manufacturer in order to get to the public. I would imagine that having sufficient Tesla auto dealers, to reach the massesx, would require such markup on the vehicle that it would greatly extend the time frame for Tesla to get an affordable vehicle to the masses.
     
  9. vfx

    vfx Well-Known Member

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  10. graham

    graham Active Member

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    I always liked the look of the Esperante. I briefly considered it for a while...

    I wish them luck - perhaps they could use a Tesla drive train in the future.
     

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