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CNET: Trying -- and kinda succeeding -- at going the distance with an electric car

tonybelding

Active Member
Aug 17, 2006
1,495
880
Hamilton, Texas
Check it. . .

Trying -- and kinda succeeding -- at going the distance with an electric car - CNET

In the comments there are already a few accusing the author of deliberately flubbing the trip as a means to attack electric cars. I don't believe it. I think it's a pretty fair article.

Some might say it's unfair to test the Leaf on a road trip, which is something it was never designed for and is clearly unsuited for. Then again, some might say it's helpful (at least for readers who are not EV fans) to test the best-selling BEV in this way and demonstrate that, yes, it is indeed unsuited for road trips.

Some might say it's unfair to drop a reviewer who's never driven an EV before into a Leaf and send him on a road trip. However, there are an awful lot of people who've never driven an EV and are going to be "noobs" real soon. If this is the kind of experience they're in for, somebody should take note.

Some mention of Tesla's longer-range cars and the Supercharger stations would have given the article more balance, perhaps. Even if they dismiss the Model S as too expensive, it still shows what's possible and what will become available for the masses in years to come.

The broken chargers and lack of support on weekends is a serious issue. I myself encountered my first Blink charge point here in Texas a few days ago. There were two chargers: one was indicating a "self-test failure", and both of them had screens so faded by the sun that they were just barely readable at all. Luckily I was there in the Jeep instead of my Roadster needing a charge!

Here's a bit of irony. . . Here in rural Texas there are effectively no charging stations. What every little town has is at least one (often multiple) RV park, city park or state park with 50-amp RV hookups. There's really not much that can go wrong with a RV hookup.
 

eloder

Active Member
Mar 12, 2015
1,214
1,427
Ohio, USA
Sounds like the Model S is truly in a class of its own, thank you Elon for your 'WORKING' SuperCharger Network! All those Errors/Non-Working Chargers on that trip would have made me RAGECANO so hard! :cursing:

When I first got my Leaf, I had to try five separate chademos before I found one that worked. I thought for sure my car was broken, but nope!
 

ItsNotAboutTheMoney

Well-Known Member
Jul 12, 2012
11,215
9,098
Maine
Check it. . .

Trying -- and kinda succeeding -- at going the distance with an electric car - CNET

In the comments there are already a few accusing the author of deliberately flubbing the trip as a means to attack electric cars. I don't believe it. I think it's a pretty fair article.

Some might say it's unfair to test the Leaf on a road trip, which is something it was never designed for and is clearly unsuited for. Then again, some might say it's helpful (at least for readers who are not EV fans) to test the best-selling BEV in this way and demonstrate that, yes, it is indeed unsuited for road trips.

Some might say it's unfair to drop a reviewer who's never driven an EV before into a Leaf and send him on a road trip. However, there are an awful lot of people who've never driven an EV and are going to be "noobs" real soon. If this is the kind of experience they're in for, somebody should take note.

Some mention of Tesla's longer-range cars and the Supercharger stations would have given the article more balance, perhaps. Even if they dismiss the Model S as too expensive, it still shows what's possible and what will become available for the masses in years to come.

The broken chargers and lack of support on weekends is a serious issue. I myself encountered my first Blink charge point here in Texas a few days ago. There were two chargers: one was indicating a "self-test failure", and both of them had screens so faded by the sun that they were just barely readable at all. Luckily I was there in the Jeep instead of my Roadster needing a charge!

Here's a bit of irony. . . Here in rural Texas there are effectively no charging stations. What every little town has is at least one (often multiple) RV park, city park or state park with 50-amp RV hookups. There's really not much that can go wrong with a RV hookup.

I agree with people commenting that it's really a pointless article.

Even the failure of the charger and the lack of weekend support isn't a good enough reason for the article.

Imagine that there hadn't been charger problems. Would it mean that you can do road trips in a Leaf? No, it wouldn't, because the problem of the broken charger, is the problem of the single charger, is the problem of contention, is the reason why you can't do road trips. It's only possible now (when chargers are working) because people don't do it.

It's just pointless to try to suggest that a limited-range, slow-refueling vehicle is going to be a road-trip vehicle. A worthwhile article would be showing use of the 50kW chargers' actual value: emergency back-up and "pushing" range.
 

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