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Competitors to the Tesla solar roof?

ckessel

Active Member
Jan 15, 2011
4,455
288
I'm looking at building a house in the next year or so and wanted to put a solar roof on it. Ideally, with a battery backup. Given the big thread about Tesla's handling of their solar roof reservations, I'm reticent to using Tesla at this point. I can't even use Tesla's site to get a quote since it requires the address of a house that doesn't exist yet. No phone number to call either. Unfortunate, I like the look and the integration, but oh well.

What other solar roof options would people recommend? The Googles came up with Luma and they look decent, but I'd like to get feedback from folks with more direct/personal experience in this area. If it helps, this is being done in the Eugene, OR area.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
10,407
11,754
Riverside Co. CA
It will be much (much) easier for you to plan on putting on a roof and then getting traditional PV panels. There isnt really a competitor for teslas solar roof. The competition is "regular roof + solar panels".
 
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EVRider-FL

Member
Aug 18, 2015
687
388
South Florida
Maybe by next year Tesla will be better at handling Solar Roof installations, so wait and see. You can get a quote even before the house is built, but there’s no reason to request a quote this soon. I got a Solar Roof quote for new construction but cancelled the order when it became clear Tesla couldn’t deliver in time (going with panels instead via a third-party installer).
 
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Two-rocks

Member
Jan 18, 2021
158
189
gone
Big prominent garage doors on the front of a house used to be less desirable.

I put big prominent solar panels on the front of my house -in my face- just to be ahead of the curve.
 

ckessel

Active Member
Jan 15, 2011
4,455
288
Maybe by next year Tesla will be better at handling Solar Roof installations, so wait and see. You can get a quote even before the house is built, but there’s no reason to request a quote this soon. I got a Solar Roof quote for new construction but cancelled the order when it became clear Tesla couldn’t deliver in time (going with panels instead via a third-party installer).
How did you get the quote? Using Tesla's website:

1) Have to have an address to fill out the fields to get to a quote and there is no address yet.
2) Requires a $100 deposit. There is no way to just ask a question.

I was able to use a nearby address and plug in the sq. footage I'm expected and it gave me a rough estimate, is that what you meant?

I got a Solar Roof quote for new construction but cancelled the order when it became clear Tesla couldn’t deliver in time
That's a definite concern. Tesla is pretty crap at being reliable on anything to do with delivery times and estimates. It doesn't sound like their solar division is any better :(.
 

ckessel

Active Member
Jan 15, 2011
4,455
288
I was able to get a Tesla person chat on their website. Basically, fill out the form with a guess at the address and they'll contact me when they serve Eugene. Oh well, the fact they don't serve it at all answers my question. Perhaps by the time I need the roof they will, but I doubt it.
 

Puma2020

Member
Jun 16, 2020
418
444
New Hampshire, USA
I do not know of any solar roof competitors. Whether you go panels or solar roof, my suggestion would be, definitely get battery backup. If the electrical folks know what is coming they can wire things more appropriately. If I was building a new house, I'd look long and hard at geothermal. With solar power (and possibly solar water heater), geothermal is simply electrical pumps moving fluids around. That also means you want to size your solar system and batteries appropriately. My thinking is basically a house with free (after ROI) heating/cooling and electrical. You pay more up front, but when you eventually sell the house, I think it'd sell very quickly because of the lack of monthly bills. Basically self sufficient.
 

jimm01

Member
Apr 29, 2021
360
402
Devonshire NJ
There was a report in Forbes? that Standard Industries (GAF, GAF Energy, etc.) will later this year announce a 'new' more intergraded solar roof, one supposedly to compete directly with Tesla's Solar Roof. This is NOT the current Decotech system. Having sold GAF roofing products one thing I believe will happen, they will figure out how to estimate and install the product.
 

jimm01

Member
Apr 29, 2021
360
402
Devonshire NJ

wjgjr

Active Member
May 11, 2020
1,305
1,037
Silver Spring, MD
Here's another option, looks ok if one's a seagull:

Interesting product - it is more like camouflaged solar panels than a solar roof, but depending on how obvious it is that the panels are sitting atop the roof, it might address the aesthetics issue, and will presumably be cheaper than a true solar roof product.
 

Southpasfan

Member
Jun 2, 2019
461
587
Pasadena
One argument for going with building the roof so that panels are integrated is the incredible progress in panel tech.

My just installed panels are 340s. My friend who is trying to get a utility grade solar and wind farm project going is already spec-ing out 500 watt panels.

The ability easily swap out panels and get 40% more production in five to ten years is significant.
 

jimm01

Member
Apr 29, 2021
360
402
Devonshire NJ
One argument for going with building the roof so that panels are integrated is the incredible progress in panel tech.
Other than cost the considerations are mostly architectural. Either by choice or by restrictive covenant. Having been a roofer I just have a fond dislike for any roof attachments and prefer direct-to-decking with as few roof penetrations a possible. As far as efficiency and energy production goes I have enough roof space to generate more than double my energy needs. However, New Jersey's net metering policy and interconnection regulations limit production to 100% of one’s annual consumption. Also, hopefully in the not to distant future new thin film technologies and other improvements will make direct-to-deck installations more efficient and easier to upgrade, (theoretically all the current direct-to-deck technologies are upgradable).

Not to go too far off subject but if the goal is first and foremost environmental we could do a lot more now to improve, production, distribution and consumption today if we weren’t a bunch of buffoons.
 

DJVoorhees

Member
Jun 16, 2019
298
163
New Jersey
Do your research. I would hate to have a new construction project hinging on Tesla's ability to put your roof on. Tesla is way too undependable right now.
 

jimm01

Member
Apr 29, 2021
360
402
Devonshire NJ
The Swiss company initiated solar modules production just recently and now wants to introduce a roof-integrated solar system that can be deployed as easily as traditional roof tiles. It intends to present the new product at the Intersolar trade show in October. First deliveries are planned for the second half of next year.

 

Will792

Member
Oct 9, 2018
34
18
CT
One argument for going with building the roof so that panels are integrated is the incredible progress in panel tech.

My just installed panels are 340s. My friend who is trying to get a utility grade solar and wind farm project going is already spec-ing out 500 watt panels.

The ability easily swap out panels and get 40% more production in five to ten years is significant.
You probably noticed that newer, higher power rating panels are typically bigger in size. This makes the proposition of upgrading panels much more difficult than it sounds. Spacing of rails becomes wrong, rails need to be extended, clearance margins change and so on. In the past companies kept the same dimensions year after year. It changed in the last few years and newer lines of panel are typically 1“-2” bigger in both dimensions.

Commercial panels with 500W rating are significantly bigger in size so comparing them with residential 60 cell panels is meaningless.
 

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