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Convert NEMA 5-20 to 6-20?

Discussion in 'Model 3: Battery & Charging' started by ratsbew, May 17, 2018.

  1. mswlogo

    mswlogo Well-Known Member

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    Use a GFCI breaker !!! Won’t be $20.
     
  2. mswlogo

    mswlogo Well-Known Member

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    That looks really bad. The only way that adapter would work is to pull a load on ground (illegal). Because that’s the only way you can get 120V from a 6-20.
     
  3. mswlogo

    mswlogo Well-Known Member

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    Yes. Make sure to use a GFCI breaker too.
     
  4. wws

    wws Member

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    Yes - you’d want to go 6-15.
     
  5. Kirby64

    Kirby64 Member

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    That adapter doesn't do anything special. No load would be put on the ground. It would just allow you to plug in a NEMA 5-15 or 5-20 into that adapter and get 240V across the leads. Code complaint? Probably not. But if you use it with your UMC, it would work perfectly fine to pull 240V/12A.

    I've got a similar cheater plug that has a NEMA 5-15 plug on one end, and a NEMA 5-15/20 receptacle on the other end. Useful if you want to eek out another 4 amps out of a NEMA 5-15 backed with 12 gauge wire...
     
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  6. davewill

    davewill Active Member

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    Actually if you look at it, you'll realize that it's just a broken listing. The title is for a 6-20 to 6-15/20 adapter, and the picture and description are for a 5-20 to 5-15/20 adapter. Lord knows what you'd actually receive if you ordered it.
     
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  7. mswlogo

    mswlogo Well-Known Member

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    That's probably as crazy as pulling 120V on Ground. Also probably why it's not available.
     
  8. Kirby64

    Kirby64 Member

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    Yeah, re-looking at that adapter, it's what @davewill stated. It's just a NEMA 5-20 -> NEMA 5-15/20. I got the poles of the hot side flipped, since NEMA 5-20 and NEMA 6-20 look almost identical (the sideways pin is on the opposite side for a NEMA 6-20.

    Honestly, although stupid to leave out for anyone to plug something into, it's not that insane. It'll blow up anything that is 120V only, but many electronic things you plug into a 120V outlet have input ratings of usually 100-240V. So, laptop chargers, cell phone breaks, heck even monitors won't flinch. Everyone designs their stuff for universal, global power these days unless it's extraordinarily difficult to do. That way you save money on designing a power converter that works in all regions, and don't have to have two lines of circuit design for 120V and 240V regions. Honestly, there's very few things that DON'T work on 240V in the US. Light bulbs, heavy motor applications (e.g. corded power tools), and appliances (e.g. washing machines, microwaves, etc) may be the exception offhand.
     
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  9. Mobsidian

    Mobsidian Member

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    I've read that the mobile charger has a GFCI built-in. Do you still need the breaker to have GFCI?
     
  10. brkaus

    brkaus Well-Known Member

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    Yes, code requires a GFCI on an outdoor outlet at 50a or below (that's a new change, it used to be below 50a).

    Edit: Changed above from "circuit" to "outlet".

    Edit Again: Sorry - I keep forgetting your not USA, so your mileage may vary. But the risk is similar as it could be used for another purpose and/or you might be standing in water when you are actually plugging in the plug.
     
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  11. mswlogo

    mswlogo Well-Known Member

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    It's required for indoor EV Charging as well. Only Hardwired does not require it (e.g. a Wall Connector).

    I put GFCI long before it was required. It's common sense.
     
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