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Convincing landlord/HOA to install charging ports/wall sockets

Discussion in 'Model 3: Battery & Charging' started by Nisesen, Jul 13, 2018.

  1. Nisesen

    Nisesen Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2018
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    San Mateo
    I'm taking delivery of my model 3 soon and am currently facing the dilemma of not being very close to any public charging stations. I live in an apartment complex right now, and my landlord rejected my initial request on the grounds that they I'd be using the shared power supply. I would like to hear what other owners who cannot home charge have done. Did you convince your landlord/HOA to allow install of a high power socket or charge stations? If so, what did you tell them to convince them?

    Thanks!!
     
  2. Nisesen

    Nisesen Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2018
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    21
    Location:
    San Mateo
    As a followup, have any of you used superchargers exclusively and seen any problems occurring? Does it eventually result in a charging rate limit as seen on the 90kwh MX and MS?
     
  3. swaltner

    swaltner Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2012
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    998
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    While the equipment is more expensive than the base models, your apartment manager could install either a ChargePoint station or a WattZilla station (with the optional Nayax credit card reader). Both would allow them to do automatic credit card billing on the electricity that you (and anyone else) use(s). While a pair of “dumb” EVSEs like the Tesla Wall connector would cost only $1,000, the WattZilla system would be close to $4,500 for a similar dual head unit and the ChargePoint system would be close to $7,000 for a two J1772 handles as well. Nayax also offers their own integrated EVSE at roughly $4k for a dual station. This added cost of the smart EVSEs is why most people just install “dumb” EVSEs.

    There are other less expensive options that include just power monitoring (manual billing) with possibly a key lock on the charging station to disable charging for unauthorized users. Either is less elegant, but also barely any added hardware expense over a dumb EVSE. Kinda depends upon what the manager would be comfortable with.

    Keep in mind that commercial installations can have pretty high install costs (trenching, long distances from power) that could make a couple thousand extra for an EVSE like the ChargePoint unit just lost in the noise.

    I’d talk to them again and make clear that you’re not trying to get free electricity and would pay for the electricity used, outlining a couple options that could be used to accomplish that.

    If they don’t budge, investigate other apartment complexes that would or have already installed charging and move when your lease is up. If you do that, be sure to let the apartment manager know that you are leaving because they refused to install on-site charging. The only way to change this mentality is to make people aware that EV charging is now/soon a base level of service that is required for housing to be considered a viable option.

    EVSE | Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Stations - ChargePoint
    WattZilla | The most powerful, dependable and durable charging stations for home or business.
    EV Meter
     
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  4. Pkmmte

    Pkmmte Le meow

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2017
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    465
    Location:
    Los Angeles, California
    I had a similar dilema when I first planned on buying a Model S. I live in an apartment complex with a semi-large outside parking lot and near-zero electricity wiring near my spot. This is in a building that has had only DSL Internet speeds until recently.

    Before getting a quote, I asked the manager to ask the owner for permission using Tesla's template letters available on their website. After one week, he granted permission to install it, as long as I paid the cost for installation and equipment. Shortly after that, I had multiple electricians come by to get me quotes. They were all $7k+. One quoted me around $3k to have a 120V outlet run to the nearest parking spot, provided that person agrees to trade spots with me. Needless to say, I decided not to have anything installed.

    Now, I simply rely on a local supercharger near my work to charge once or twice per week while eating lunch at the mall's food court. No issues so far. It would've been really nice to be able to charge at home, but it was never a deal breaker. No charging rate limit on my Model 3 so far after ~6,500 miles.
     
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  5. HopeToGolf

    HopeToGolf Member

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    Mar 31, 2016
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    Location:
    USA - New Jersey
    Not too much to add except I recently looked at two apartments with two different solutions. Maybe these can spark a few ideas for you.

    1) The complex has one ChargePoint station with two J1772 handles. The complex charges about 15% more for the two reserved spots where the ChargePoint is installed. The charging is free. That said the monthly charge for the covered parking is obscene (I think...haven’t lived in an apartment for years). It is a brand new building with maybe 50% rented. All I’m thinking is a) what the hell are they going to do/say when more EV owners want to move in and b) since I now have one of the two spots, how many “discussions” am I going to have to have with my fellow tenants and management when someone is in my spot. I haven’t moved in yet but I guess what could happen is only me and the other spot owner will have the ability to unlock the ChargePoint. I’m hoping the ChargePoint is locked and folks are respectful since I am paying a premium for the spot. That said, I think it is a poor long term solution. They are going to need more plugs for the tenants and/or cannot let two people exclusively rent them. Periodically I think about the alternative solutions I may come up with to help out a fellow EV owner and maybe defray some cost.

    2) The complex has one (maybe two) ChargePoint with two handles. It is located in an unreserved portion of a parking structure. Depending on where you live in the complex, it may be out of your “parking zone” but you can use the ChargePoint and the charging is free. I think the idea is you use the ChargePoint and go back to your parking zone. This is also not a great solution because what if two EV owners are zoned for that area, I imagine they will park and plug in. Management will need to ask folks to move their cars after they charge. It will probably be a game of who gets home from work first to plug in and then go to bed.

    The same management company owns both properties. The impression I got is the demand for charging is low. When I asked about it a number of calls had to be made. However, they are really going after the tenants in #1 with all garaged parking not just the EV owners. Uncovered is free but garaged costs an arm and leg.
     
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  6. SpiceWare

    SpiceWare Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Messages:
    661
    Location:
    Fresno, Texas
    Using keyword keyword "EV" for San Mateo brings up a number of apartment complexes with charging, though far fewer than I'd have expected for California. Other apartment search engines may have different results.

    Plugshare shows a number of options as well. Seem to be mostly ChargePoint stations, so you'd use your 3's included adapter.
     
  7. Graffi

    Graffi Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2017
    Messages:
    650
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    If cost is an issue, a simple 20a/120v outlet will do. Better for a NEMA 14-50/240v outlet that could be installed near your dedicated parking spot. A rough estimate for electricity cost would be $0.05 per mile, so determine your daily cost by estimating your daily driving distance times the nickle per mile. If you drive 20 miles per day that is only $1.00 per day/$30.00 per month. Hard to justify spending Thousands of dollars to install an EVSE to plug into, especially the smart ones that cost more than 20 years of electric use.

    Knowing the above costs you could speak to the Apt management about just paying for the electricity used from the common source. Most people who know nothing about EV's have no Idea how cheap electric driving is. jmho
     
  8. HopeToGolf

    HopeToGolf Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2016
    Messages:
    144
    Location:
    USA - New Jersey
    This is so true. In my discussions with complex management about the obscene cost of parking and the extra cost of EV parking they added, “but the charging is free.” I told them there was so little added value there it’s almost not worth talking about.
     

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