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Cost Anxiety; not Range

Discussion in 'News' started by malcolm, Aug 26, 2010.

  1. malcolm

    malcolm Active Member

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    #1 malcolm, Aug 26, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2010
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/green-motoring/7960254/Two-thirds-of-drivers-turned-off-by-electric-cars.html

    http://www.parkers.co.uk/News/News/Car-buyers-turned-off-by-electric-cars/

    From the parkers link:

    Of course, your mileage may vary.
     
  2. mpt

    mpt Electrics are back

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    This bothers me:

    The "Clarkson effect"?
     
  3. Jaff

    Jaff Active Member

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    So 35% total don't buy the "greenness / conventional car" arguments, eh? That sounds about right. :biggrin:


    How's that old quote go..."Just think how stupid the average person is, then remember half of those folks are even stupider..." :rolleyes::biggrin::wink:

    I find it odd that many folks spend hours each week sorting, recycling, composting and performing other green tasks, but when it comes to cars, economics always has to enter the equation.:rolleyes:

    Time is money. Time is more valuable than money (in the long run).

    Give me time to drive an electric vehicle like the Tesla, and I'll feel less guilty about my recycling transgressions..:biggrin::wink:

     
  4. tdelta1000

    tdelta1000 Active Member

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    "it could take up to 12 and a half years before buyers see any real savings."

    This statement fails to factor in the costs of maintaining an ICE vehicle (spark plugs, oils, air filter and the labor for changing those item).

    Therefore, in 12 twelve years the EV would end up being cheaper in the long run.
     
  5. malcolm

    malcolm Active Member

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    True, but the elephant in our service station is the issue of battery replacement, which is also likely to impact on the growth of a second-hand EV market.

    How fast/far can manufacturers drive down costs on the pack?
     
  6. tdelta1000

    tdelta1000 Active Member

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    I think within three to five years the cost of an EV battery pack will drop becuase the number of manufactures building batteries.
     
  7. malcolm

    malcolm Active Member

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    #7 malcolm, Aug 30, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2010
    http://green.autoblog.com/2010/08/29/mitsubishi-admits-i-mievs-total-cost-of-ownership-might-be-high/
    In the short/medium term EVs will continue to be more expensive than their ICE equivalents, both in terms of purchase and battery replacement.

    If, howsever, the Roadster's battery pack costs £13,000 to replace (and assuming 100,000 miles uses £2000 of electricity) then that still works out cheaper than 100,000 miles-worth of UK petrol at a fixed £1.15 per litre for any car getting less that 35mpg (that's imperial gallons, of course).

    We forget that it took over ten years for mobile phones to develop from their (laughable) first appearance in the 1980s to mass market breakthrough in the early 2000s. (And even then, they had to be pushed as fashion accessories with repaceable covers to the teenager and young adult markets - who foresaw that?)

    We haven't even reached the tenth anniversary of the debut of the Roadster. In mobile phone terms, we're still stuck in the 1980s, trying to puzzle out the next move.
     
  8. tomsax

    tomsax Member

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    I doubt that the only cars that sell in the UK are those cars in each class which have the lowest total cost of ownership. People buy cars partly based on cost but also on other factors: convenience, comfort, driving experience, and visual appeal.

    The advantages of driving electric only start with reduced CO2 and low fuel cost. There's also instant torque largely independent of speed, the convenience of not having to fuel at a gas/petrol station, independence from wildly fluctuating oil prices, and the satisfaction of using locally produced energy instead of sending your fuel dollars overseas.

    Once people start to see EVs on the road and hear about them from their friends and coworkers, they'll find out that they want to drive electric even if it does cost a little extra. As the cost of EVs comes down and the price of oil goes up, we'll be ready with an auto industry capable of building the cars everyone will want.
     
  9. mpt

    mpt Electrics are back

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    tomsax: agreed; it's the living with electric that changes your priorities.

    We should also look at the cost of ownership of a comparable 911... Service costs anyone?
     
  10. kgb

    kgb Member

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    Real simple solution: Gov't needs to subsidize battery purchase and replacement in the same way they subsidize gasoline now. Even better, stop subsidizing gasoline and subsidize battery/fuel cell technology instead.
     
  11. SByer

    SByer '08 #383

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    #11 SByer, Aug 30, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2010
    911? It was nuts. I'm not very good at keeping track of such things, but it was _more_. Tires were about equivalent, but it was never less than $1500 when going in at least once a year, and when the soft top had to be replaced... oy! Let's not even talk about the clutch...

    There are many more EV advantages that are more subtle, but all adding up. Peacefulness is one I don't hear often, but I feel every day. Stopped at a light, I don't feel the constant pressure of go-go-go from a rumbling block of inefficiency. Plus, if I'm at the front of the line, there's the fun part to anticipate (and it's pure fun, not like the balky launches in the 911 if I didn't get the clutch release _just so_).

    kgb: How about just stop subsidizing gas? I strongly believe a free market works if all costs are exposed. Current alternative technologies would already be a clear win on an even playing field...
     
  12. vfx

    vfx Well-Known Member

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    Agree with the simple act of removing oil and gas subsidies. Putting gasoline at it's real number of around $10 a gallon would make EVs a slam dunk.
     
  13. mpt

    mpt Electrics are back

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    Too funny LOL
     
  14. tdelta1000

    tdelta1000 Active Member

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  15. malcolm

    malcolm Active Member

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    Well that's a step in the right direction. But of course, we're a long way from seeing this sort of cutthroat competition between EV makers, so these savings may not get passed on.
     

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