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Cost (charging)

Forty_Two

Member
Oct 7, 2021
101
20
UK
Looking at some Youtube clips I saw some motorway chargers had a price on them e.g. 40p per Kwh.

1. What do you expect to pay for each Kwh charge?
2. How many miles do you expect to get for each Kwh of charge?
 

Dilly

Active Member
Feb 24, 2020
2,343
1,893
Norfolk
Solar panels, home charger, 4000 miles = £21.00
4 miles per kWh
last SuC visit in Sept was 34p per kWh. £6.46 out of £21.00!
Dirt cheap motoring
 

26ct2143

Member
Nov 22, 2020
218
92
Burton-on-Trent, UK
For me the tesla is more frugal than our leaf (unless you nail it).
4 mi/kwh is well possible in the summer with steady driving.
these days 40p/kwh at a supercharger is a good price.
Try out the ionity chargers, then you'll get a bill like you'd filled a range rover up from empty on super unleaded. avoid avoid..
 

Lord Farquad

2021 SR+ MIC LFP
Aug 20, 2021
85
66
North West
If you drive sensibly you should get 4 to 5 miles per kwh. With home electric at 26p per kwh you’re paying 5-6p per mile. Get a cheap overnight rate (as low as 5p per kWh currently) and it’s 1p per mile.
An ICE car doing 45mpg costs 14-15p per mile currently.
If you take whatever kWh rate the motorway charger is costing and divide it by 4 or 5 you’ll get your mile cost.
NB this is for model 3. Most electric cars aren’t as efficient. Most are doing 3 miles per kWh.
I’m getting 5 pkwh around town and 4.5 at a steady cruise on the motorway (2021 SR+ MIC LFP).
 

UkNorthampton

TSLA - 12+ startups in 1
Jun 15, 2019
804
7,220
Northampton, England
Solar panels, home charger, 4000 miles = £21.00
4 miles per kWh
last SuC visit in Sept was 34p per kWh. £6.46 out of £21.00!
Dirt cheap motoring
Euro Tour, some free Supercharger miles, possibly some free charges - £80. Much more spent on snacks.

In UK, only used Superchargers on 1 trip. Other trips used 7kw destination chargers - roughly 25p / kwh. One holiday, loads of driving, days out: 4-5 hours driving on 2 separate day trips maybe £20 (80 kwh), maybe more - £30. When you pay more for ice creams or parking than you do on a 5 hour journey...
 
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Peter 224

Member
May 9, 2021
456
299
Salisbury
Average since May is 258 watt hours/mile, so close to 4 miles/kw, mostly rural and urban driving.
Charging at home at £0.155/kwh that is close to 4p/mile.
I agree, Tesla seems to manage energy well, BMW claim for their new I4-50 2.5 to 3.5 miles/kwh from their state of the art technology.
 

MrT3

Member
Jun 26, 2021
408
233
UK
37 p/kWh at Warwick services the other day. Prices have gone up recently due to the rise in energy costs.
 

Alan J

Member
Jun 17, 2019
273
177
Glasgow
Looking at some Youtube clips I saw some motorway chargers had a price on them e.g. 40p per Kwh.

1. What do you expect to pay for each Kwh charge?
2. How many miles do you expect to get for each Kwh of charge?
As others have said a Tesla is very cheap to drive most people use home charging on a low cost tariff and some have access to free charging at work etc. In Scotland around half of the admittedly slightly unreliable Public Chargers are free. Quite a lot of Supermarkets also have free chargers. Download the Zapmap App to see the situation where you live / work.
 
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Mr H

Active Member
Jan 6, 2020
1,959
2,147
Manchester
Looking at some Youtube clips I saw some motorway chargers had a price on them e.g. 40p per Kwh.

1. What do you expect to pay for each Kwh charge?
2. How many miles do you expect to get for each Kwh of charge?
Are you really interested in buying an EV (apologies if you are) as all your questions look suspiciously like market research.
 

UkNorthampton

TSLA - 12+ startups in 1
Jun 15, 2019
804
7,220
Northampton, England
Are you really interested in buying an EV (apologies if you are) as all your questions look suspiciously like market research.
I'd also say that a few Bjorn videos (https://www.youtube.com/user/bjornnyland/videos) might be in order, or if the OP prefers written/comparisons -



example info.
1633893022514.png
 
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Irata

Member
Oct 16, 2020
583
352
UK
Looking at some Youtube clips I saw some motorway chargers had a price on them e.g. 40p per Kwh.

1. What do you expect to pay for each Kwh charge?
2. How many miles do you expect to get for each Kwh of charge?

From watching all those clips, I'd be very interested to hear what figures you came up with?
 

DaSwede

Member
Jul 8, 2020
51
107
UK
Looking at some Youtube clips I saw some motorway chargers had a price on them e.g. 40p per Kwh.

1. What do you expect to pay for each Kwh charge?
2. How many miles do you expect to get for each Kwh of charge?
I saw that you are new to the forum so welcome!

1. If the pricing is confusing, maybe this will help:

If you have a model 3 Long range, your total battery capacity is about 75 kWh. So, if you would run your battery down to half, it would take 37.5 kWh to charge it back to full. In that case, your charge would cost 40p * 37.5=£15

2. For each kWh, you will get around 4 miles ( a bit less in the winter due to cold battery, a bit more in the summer) so in the example, you would be able to drive another 37.5*4=150 miles until you are down to half of your charge again.

So, your cost per mile driven would be 10p when using a charger at that rate. But, as many others have pointed out, the total cost per mile is normally much lower as most have a charger at home to where they pay only 5-7p/ kWh ( which takes the cost down to less than 2p / mile)

I hope that helps!
 

SpareHeadOne

Member
Oct 27, 2020
396
273
UK
Looking at some Youtube clips I saw some motorway chargers had a price on them e.g. 40p per Kwh.

1. What do you expect to pay for each Kwh charge?
2. How many miles do you expect to get for each Kwh of charge?

1. I expect to pay whatever the operator charges, I don't think I quite understand the question. Until recently that was a little under 30p/kWh from Tesla, 40-45p/kWh for most other rapid chargers and about 70p/kWh for Ionity. Actually, strike that last one as I don't ever expect to use them at those prices. Because of recent energy price rises I expect Tesla to be more like 36p/kWh, but while I expect similar rises for the others I've not looked.

2. Depends on the driving and external weather, but at motorway speeds typically 3½-4 miles per kWh.


I do think there is a danger of public charging turning into a confusopoly, like mobile phone services, because there are already providers (e.g. BP Pulse) who charge different amounts depending on the speed of the charger and whether or not you have a subscription. In their FAQ they list nine different prices per kWh.


(For anyone who doesn't know a confusopoly is when providers structure their prices in such a way that price comparison is almost impossible. e.g. Will it be cheaper for me to rapid charge with Ionity and a subscription or BP Pulse and a subscription?)
 

DaSwede

Member
Jul 8, 2020
51
107
UK
Don’t forget that not all apples are the same. Tesla measures DC to the car (battery?). Everyone else measures A/C to the chargepoint. There’s something like 15% loss in the conversion for A/C to D/C so Tesla’s 37p would be more like 42p with anyone else.
Very true. As far as I know, Tesla is the only brand that you pay for what you get into your battery. Others, you are paying for the cable losses and charger insufficiencies which may be 10-15% more
 
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Mr Miserable

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Jul 8, 2019
5,452
10,372
UK
Petrol stations have their petrol pumps regularly checked to ensure that when they say they have delivered 1 litre, they really have but that is not the case with public EV chargers.
As has been pointed out, only Tesla charge for the kWh supplied to the car battery and the others generally charge for what the charger has consumed in total, or so we think. The differences can be large and the losses soon add up especially nowadays at 40p+ per kWh. There is no incentive or requirement for the charging companies to reduce the 'conversion losses' in their equipment or for their metering to be within any standard. They can carry on using inefficient components and nobody seem to care. I asked Which? to conduct tests on the various brands of EV chargers but never received a reply, probably because they don't understand the issue.
A call to the local trading standards confirmed that there is no approved standard of measurement for DC charging which considering the rigourous requirements for the supply of electricity I found surprising.
The government department responsible for this grey area is the Office for Product Safety and Standards which is part of the Department of Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy. Who knew?
The applicable legislation to be amended would be the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Regulations 2017.
 

NewbieT

Active Member
Aug 16, 2019
1,245
870
North West
One to think about. When the CMA did it’s market study (Final report) it used estimates of £7m to put a new supply into a single MSA. Might be worth finding out what agreements are being handed out to get access to the Road Charging Fund. If they’re loans and not grants, then the cost will have to come through at the pump.

Edit: The rapid charging fund will be available to fund ‘a portion of costs’ for ‘open’ charge points. i.e. If Tesla wants to access the fund, it has to open the network at that site. Let’s hope Gridserve join Tesla at every MSA.
 
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