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Costco now has a Tesla Semi

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MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
24,750
65,538
Oregon
A post on X shows that Costco now has a Tesla Semi in their fleet:


Zanegler said that there would be ~9 new customers showing up over the next bit:

screenshot-teslamotorsclub.com-2024.05.08-12_35_50.png
 
I'm more interested in the charging facilities for these (and other brand big trucks) at their main depots. Theoretically they need to be putting upwards of 500kWh back in the battery each night, and have 12 hours to do it? So they need to be >40kW at a minimum. I'd expect them to have a couple of the megachargers available too, to handle quick turnarounds in the same day.
 
I'm more interested in the charging facilities for these (and other brand big trucks) at their main depots. Theoretically they need to be putting upwards of 500kWh back in the battery each night, and have 12 hours to do it? So they need to be >40kW at a minimum. I'd expect them to have a couple of the megachargers available too, to handle quick turnarounds in the same day.
First, that all depends on your route/loads. It is possible that some of them will use less than 500kWh/day.

As far as we have seen the Tesla Semi doesn't have AC charging, it uses the Tesla Megacharger only, which in the standard configuration are rated for 750kW.
 
Most of the EV semis currently use CCS1 (AC & DC). Some like the Freightliner (and maybe others?) use dual CCS1 one charger per "bank".

The Tesla and some other more prototype vehicles use the MCS (Megawatt charging standard). Most chargers now are around 750kW to 1MW max but the standard is supposed to support up to 3.5MW :oops:.

Once MCS chargers are more readily available I assume everything will have an MCS port and possibly CCS1 or NACS for top off/hotel loads.

My *assumption* is the trucks will only be used to and from specific facilities for trial. Getting the permitting and utility on board to support a single MS charger let alone multiple is not an easy task....even with a microgrid to support.
 
Most of the trucks have batteries under the cab as well as on the side of the frame. Replacing them is not trivial!

Also keep in mind there are coolant connections as well as electrical connections. Its not really fast or easy to change packs….charging them takes much less time!
 
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Most of the trucks have batteries under the cab as well as on the side of the frame. Replacing them is not trivial!

Also keep in mind there are coolant connections as well as electrical connections. It’s not really fast or easy to change packs….charging them takes much less time!
I guess your point is that current SEMI battery design won’t support swapping and charging the battery is faster than swapping. That’s really a Good point that no one had realized ! lol
 
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It actually makes more sense to have these semis to adopt battery swap strategy.
it will be even better if the Battery can be easily swapped (unloaded and loaded) in small blocks by the crew loading the goods.
I'll just say that given one of the delays for the Tesla Semi was lack of available batteries, having extra packs sitting around doing nothing waiting for a Semi to come get a pack changed would be bad. As that would mean fewer Semis could be built and on the road. And we need as many on the road as possible.
 
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