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Could AutoPilot detect alignment issues?

Discussion in 'Model S: User Interface' started by kirkbauer, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. kirkbauer

    kirkbauer Member

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    I was thinking that, at least in extreme cases, AutoPilot should be able to detect alignment issues in our vehicles.

    Thoughts on if that would be possible and useful?
     
  2. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    The alignment hardware in today's cars is really rather primitive. Cars really should be self-aligning. However, I don't see how the autopilot hardware could detect an alignment condition (other than pulling, but that's only one symptom).
     
  3. kirkbauer

    kirkbauer Member

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    That's what I was thinking -- if it is pulling, which I know isn't always the case, it could theoretically alert you.
     
  4. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    You can detect that easier than autopilot. Toe is more important and harder for the average person to detect in a timely manner.
     
  5. sorka

    sorka Active Member

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    I don't think you need auto pilot. There's no reason why the car can't figure out that more energy is being used than it should by taking into account speed, barometer, temperature, wind, and elevation changes and detected tire pressure. It wouldn't be quick and would require lots of averaging. In the asymmetrical cases, simply detecting, over a period of time, that asymmetrical steering input is needed to keep the car straight after taking into account wind and levelness of road could also detect alignment issues.

    Some vehicle TPMS implementations use this technique to detect low tire pressure in cars that don't actually have the sensors.

    See Indirect TMPS:
    Tire-pressure monitoring system - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  6. S4WRXTTCS

    S4WRXTTCS Active Member

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    If the car is pulling one way or the other way I imagine the autopilot could in theory do a better job of detecting than a human. The Tesla has the advantage of knowing exactly how your car previously traveled over this same road, and has data from hundreds of other Tesla's over this same road. It should be able to detect pulling or the wheel being off centered driving straight.

    I wouldn't be too surprised if autopilot didn't even work in extreme cases of misalignment. Like being completely out of whack after hitting a pot hole.

    This topic reminds me of the movie Rush where he used his "butt" to determine what was wrong with the car. What's the autonomous car equivalent for that?
     

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