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Could use some help before I visit repair shop re a nail in a tire

Discussion in 'Roadster' started by SteveG3, Jul 19, 2016.

  1. SteveG3

    SteveG3 Active Member

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    I don't have a lot of experience with what's repairable vs. in need of replacement in these circumstances and could use a hand.

    attached is a photo of the nail in the tire.

    when I found it I called Tesla's 800 number and they told me their policy was strictly replacements, no repairs. I've had a tire in a Subaru repaired, and as the guy who helped me out said at the time, the repair was nothing to worry about at all.

    now, I don't know if Tesla's policy is simply very conservative, or if it reflects the difference between the run of the mill tires on the Subaru and the tires on my Roadster (Yokohama 175/55 R16 80W).

    is this being a high performance tire an issue? I don't want to do anything foolish to save some money, but I also don't want to walk into the repair shop totally ignorant and susceptible to them playing games to sell the guy with the expensive car new tires. IMG_0876.jpg
     
  2. Morristhecat

    Morristhecat Member

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    I believe as long as it isn't in the sidewalk or corner, it can be repaired with a plug. But then you wouldn't want to do any crazy stuff with a plug in your tires, but it should be fine for normal driving. That being said, your tires don't look like there is much tread on them. Might want to get them measured.
     
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  3. Evbwcaer

    Evbwcaer Member

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    As said before a plug is fine if not in the shoulder or sidewall. I would have no concerns at all if that tire were taken off and patched from the inside. I would have almost no concern about plugging it myself with tire plug kit, those plugs work really well. I have had plugs outlast tires.

    Something like this:
    Shop Slime Deluxe Reamer/Plugger Kit-Pistol Grip Style at Lowes.com
     
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  4. SteveG3

    SteveG3 Active Member

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    thanks for the response. not doing crazy stuff with the car, in fact, it gets used quite lightly.

    as to the tire treads: you're right that they're worn some. I bought the car a little over a year ago, and had a Tesla service center in the Bay area inspect it before the purchase... they said this tire was 5, 5, 4 (the only tire with a 4). local service center here on the east coast measured as all 6s when I did an annual after I bought the car. kind of raises other questions, lols.

    given that I really put very little miles per year (hundreds, not thousands) and replacing would probably mean replacing at least two tires, I'm considering a plug. that said, this is an area I'm pretty ignorant about, so opinions from anyone with more knowledge are welcome.
     
  5. MileHighMotoring

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    That's what I was going to post - pictures can be deceiving, but it looks like less than 5/32 left on that tire to my eyes.
     
  6. MileHighMotoring

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    Those are all pretty close to needing to be replaced anyhow. 4/32 is time to replace. Especially on a high-performance tire.
     
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  7. Alketi

    Alketi Member

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    +1. I've plugged every nail in every tire I've ever owned with a kit exactly like that. Never had one leak after that for the life of the tire. Granted, if you're driving track sprints on 21" tires at 50PSI you might feel more comfortable with a full replacement, but just my .02.
     
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  8. Vitold

    Vitold Member

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    Depends where you drive. If roads you travel have a shoulder, take a chance and plug it. Otherwise get new tires.
     
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  9. sethr

    sethr CPO Roadster #1089

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    I got a nail in the same place, and the repair was fine for the several months before I got new tires (rear - they go so fast!). The repair was done, however, by removing the tire, and placing a patch/plug inside the tire; in addition to filling the hole, it secures the plug. Apparently this is recommended for low profile tires due to higher stresses. Not too expensive - $25. Better safe than sorry. My 2 cents.
     
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  10. roblab

    roblab Active Member

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    My one cent worth: Buy new tires from Costco or Tire Rack (who are more likely to have what you want). Then have a local tire shop mount and balance. This will save you time and money over taking them to Tesla. You can have Tire Rack send them directly to your tire store.
     
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  11. CHG-ON

    CHG-ON Still in love after all these miles

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    Easily plugged when in the tread. I don't believe a sidewall puncture is repairable. Too much flexing going on, I have been told. Even compared to the tread.
     
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  12. gregd

    gregd Member

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    I had a nail repair (plug) at a local Les Schwab. Photo looked pretty much the same as yours (but I have more tread on the tire). This was the one time (in my life) that the TPMS system actually warned me of the issue.

    Just be sure that you go to a place that can deal with the specific jacking requirements of the Roadster. I warned them ahead of time that improper jacking of the car could total it, and that woke them up! The service manager performed the repair himself (and did so properly), and all went well.
     
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  13. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

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    I'll have to remember that line about totaling the car.

    Let's see - the checklist grows:

    Using the correct lift points
    Not stripping/rounding the soft caps on top of the lug nuts - or the lug nuts for that matter
    Torquing to the correct spec
    Not damaging the rim(s)
    Not damaging the car exterior or interior
    Not bogarting valve stem caps (I have custom ones, saw a tech at an America's Tire pocket one and then deny it later)
    Oh yeah - and repairing the tire (if reparable)

    I'm glad Tesla has confirmed that they will rotate OEM (new or replacement sets regardless of source) tires. And it's nice that there are America's/Discount Tire and other decent tire shops around. Regardless, I think it's time I invested in doing rotations and (as possible) flat repairs myself.
     
  14. mspohr

    mspohr Active Member

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    I think the issue with Tesla's "replacement only" policy is that these are high performance tires and any repair will not meet specs for "high performance tires.
    That said, if you only drive your mother to church on Sunday, you should be OK with a plug (provided your mother is willing to push the car if you get a flat).
     
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  15. Evbwcaer

    Evbwcaer Member

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    You don't need to take the wheel
    of the car to plug the tire. If you want to put a patch on the inside then yes, but for a plug you do not need to remove the wheel/tire.

    Just drive and park, or rotate the steering for a front wheel/tire, so that the site is easy to get at.
     
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  16. gregd

    gregd Member

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    Interesting. Whatever Les Schwab did (I thought it was a plug), they required to take the tire off so they could get to the inside. He said there was something they had to do from there. Seemed to know what he was talking about, and it's held up well so far.

    If that means a patch, then that's probably the correct repair for this sort of tire. Mine was the driver's side rear, a Michelin Pilot Sport.
     
  17. dandelot

    dandelot Member

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    I had a nail. Took wheel/tire to my regular tire guy. He fixed while I waited, $25. The book says nothing about wheel torque, but 125 ft-lbs is right. Tesla SC told me about the nail (in for annual svc), I had not noticed anything (yet!). Yes, I have a 2+ ton jack. The tire guy's tech hinted that some of their jacks are not big enough to lift a Tesla corner...
     
  18. wiztecy

    wiztecy Active Member

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    #18 wiztecy, Jul 20, 2016
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2016
    This is WRONG for the TESLA ROADSTER!

    DO NOT torque the lugs down to 125ft lbs at all or else you'll damage things, bend rotors, lug nuts can sheer off, rims can break and fail, and if that doesn't happen most likely you'll never get the wheel off again. The proper torque for the Tesla Roadster is: 77ft-lbs.

    Wheels; Replacing The Wheel; Removing The Wheel - Tesla Roadster 2 Owner's Manual [Page 81]

    Its the same torque specs as the Lotus Elise.

    PLEASE VERIFY the CORRECT forum you're posting in, posting incorrect information for the wrong forum/car can prove to be quite dangerous. The 125 ft-lbs you're talking about must be for the Model-S, and that's a little off, its actually 129 ft-lbs to torque down the Model-S wheels:

    The Tesla Model S Wheel Guide - Tsportline
     
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  19. CSPHD

    CSPHD Member

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    Dang! wiztecy is fast and posted in the time it took me to log in. See page 9-6 in the owner's manual. It is 77 lbft.
     
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  20. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    I had a similar nail and plugged it myself without ever removing the tire. As others said I would not high speed track a car with a plug but mine did fine in normal driving.
     

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