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Deciphering State Park personnel’s outlet description

Discussion in 'Model 3: Battery & Charging' started by Dana1, Aug 1, 2018.

  1. Dana1

    Dana1 Supporting Member

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    Sooooo, three reps later I have information that the campsites have 2, 3, and 4 prong outlets. 20, 30, and 50 amps. 110 and 240V. They can give no better descriptions.

    The 2 prongs I’m guessing is a standard ungrounded house plug.

    Any thoughts on the name of the 4 prong, 50a outlet so I can get an adapter if it’s not already in my UMC?
     
  2. Dana1

    Dana1 Supporting Member

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    Actually, found answer in general forum.
     
  3. Rocky_H

    Rocky_H Active Member

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    Yeah, camping terminology is very simplistic, but for reference, here are camping names, and the real outlet names:
    "20 amp" = 5-20 120V 20A
    "30 amp" = TT-30 120V 30A
    "50 amp" = 14-50 240V 50A
     
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  4. ewoodrick

    ewoodrick Active Member

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    I'll confirm that, you want 50A service. You should already have the plug for that. 30A service charges slower and will require an adapter.

    50A service is used my campers with 2 air conditioners. Most campgrounds have it.
     
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  5. eprosenx

    eprosenx Active Member

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    In practical terms, here are the power capacities of each of these connection types (note that the last one could support 40a, but the UMC Gen 2 tops out at 32 so I calculated it as if it is 32a):

    20a at 120v = 16 * 120 = 1.92kw
    30a at 120v = 24 * 120 = 2.88kw
    50a at 240v = 32 * 240 = 7.68kw

    In case you are worried you can't get a camp site with a 50a NEMA 14-50 then you may want to buy one of these to take with you as a backup (I have one).
    AC WORKS EVSE Charging Adapter RV TT-30P 30 Amp Plug to 50 Amp Electric Vehicle Adapter for Tesla Model S-EVTT30MS - The Home Depot
     
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  6. Thomas Edison

    Thomas Edison Active Member

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  7. XHabjab

    XHabjab Helping to end the ICE Age

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    #7 XHabjab, Aug 2, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2018
    Yes.

    Some very important details
    1. Make sure that you get the adapter that works for EVs. Don't get a "dogbone" or equivalent adapter from an RV store. That one will probably look identical but won't work.
    2. Do NOT attempt to use the one for your car on an RV. BZZZT! Much sadness.
    3. If you have a Tesla and an RV, take a Sharpie and write either "Tesla" or "RV" on the plug(s). Don't mix them up.
    When you buy whatever you buy, go to an RV park and test it out before you need it.
     
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  8. Thomas Edison

    Thomas Edison Active Member

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    I assume the standard RV adapter has both hots bridged and the Tesla one kills the extra terminal?
     
  9. eprosenx

    eprosenx Active Member

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    Yes. The RV one would have both hots connected to the hot in the TT-30, and neutral connected to neutral. So zero potential volts between hots. Would let you run 120v stuff in an RV but no 240v stuff. Would not work at all with Tesla.

    Now the Tesla one has netural hooked to one hot and the hot connected to the other hot. The question is what they did with the neutral on the 14-50. I am guessing they would also tie it to neutral as to not create a floating neutral. So you would get 0v from one hot to the neutral, and 120v from the other hot to the neutral.

    I own the grey one but have not used it yet. I suppose I could go dig it out and throw a multimeter on it if I really cared enough to test. ;-)
     
  10. Thomas Edison

    Thomas Edison Active Member

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    I think you should, for the sake of the children.
     
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  11. eprosenx

    eprosenx Active Member

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    Lol, ok, well in that case I will go put on some pants and get the adapter out of my car in the driveway. One sec..
     
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  12. eprosenx

    eprosenx Active Member

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    Ok, well interesting news!

    The neutral pin on the 14-50 receptacle of this adapter is floating. Not tied to any other pins.
     
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  13. timk225

    timk225 Active Member

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    I saw a YouTube video a while back about rewiring an RV park adapter to work with Teslas. Wires have to be moved around.
     
  14. SpiceWare

    SpiceWare Member

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    This TT-30 Adapter for Gen 2 UMC seems like it would be a safer solution, don't have to remember to dial down the amps.

    NEMA_TT-30_Gen2_9713fd45-c9b0-49fd-bb93-f92742eab92d_1024x1024.jpg
     
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  15. eprosenx

    eprosenx Active Member

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    Yes! Good point.

    Though these third party adapters for the UMC sketch me out a bit since I thought the factory ones had heat sensors in the head of the adapter as well? How do the aftermarket ones handle that? Or maybe I am wrong about the temp sensors?

    Anyway, you are right that the adapter linked provides the value in that would automatically properly limit the charge current.
     
  16. SpiceWare

    SpiceWare Member

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    Don't know - based on the price it looks like they're purchasing 10-30 or 14-30 adapters from Tesla and rewiring them with a different plug. As part of that process I'd expect them to reuse the existing heat sensor (if it exists), or install a new one.
     
  17. Dana1

    Dana1 Supporting Member

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    For the sake of the children, please do, lol
     
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