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Design for Manufacturing as it relates to repair

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by trils0n, May 30, 2016.

  1. trils0n

    trils0n 2013 P85

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    Model 3 is designed for ease of manufacture.

    Does anyone familiar with manufacturing know if this translates to ease of repair in the case of accidents/body work or are these different design goals?
     
  2. JeffK

    JeffK Active Member

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    As far as body work I'm told that working with steel is easier than working with aluminum.
     
  3. Unchangeable

    Unchangeable Member

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    As an engineer with no car design experience they're not opposing design goals at least. But generally they will use aligning features and fewer parts meaning for accidents it will be fewer larger parts to replace and maybe whatever internal parts that they were aligned with. But replacing the parts may be difficult since it probably wouldn't be how it was manufactured. So you can't say it will definitely be harder or easier to repair because they designed it for manufacturing.
     
  4. vjason

    vjason Member

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    As someone who has done most of the work on his own cars my experience is this:

    I've rarely seen any significant design considerations with regard to serviceability. I'm not talking about the electronic parts which are understandably difficult for home mechanics, but simple repair procedures. I'm sure some exceptions are made, but given the efforf and skinned knuckles required to do basic maintenance on (some of) my cars over the years I can say it isn't made for everything.

    Sometimes special tools and procedures make a repair easier to perform, and the dealers obviously have those. Some repairs simply require lots of things to be removed, which means there is no special tool for that.

    Manufacturers want cars that are reliable and easy to manufacture. Given that few repairs are needed within the warranty period, there is little incentive to make something easier to repair when the customer will paying for most of the repairs (if needed; cars are pretty reliable these days).

    Most of the horror stories I could tell (water pumps buried inside an engine for example) are with ICE cars, but Tesla is no different than other manufacturers in that they want it easy to manufacture first, and service second. They simply have the advantage of their cars being heavily software dependent, and contain fewer moving parts, which means that they require less service in the first place.
     
  5. jaguar36

    jaguar36 Member

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    BMW at least seems to put a large amount of effort into making sure that service is easy on its cars. The oil filter is right on top of the engine, very easy to access. Replacing most of the bulbs on the cars requires no tools at all, and takes just a few seconds. I'm not sure if this is because the include maintenance for the first 50k miles, or if its just good design practice.
     
  6. MountainRatMat

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    I am surprised by this. Not something I expected from BMW.

    On another note DFM improves reliability and drives down cost, DFS is usually an afterthought. I would assume most companies focus much more on DFM than DFS since the payback is greater on DFM.
     

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