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Destroyed MYP Battery on '22 with 7.5k miles

Driving home in the New York rain the other day, I hit something on the highway. No idea what it was, but I suspect it was a part from another vehicle or possible the asphalt from the road. Smashed through the undercarriage/armor just behind the passenger front wheel. I was driving 50mph because of the poor visibility, but 30 seconds after I hit the object, all the alerts started popping up. Reduced power, low coolant, reduced HVAC functionality, speed limited to 67, 63, 57, then 53. Car told me it was safe to drive, so I took it another 15 minutes home.

Got home and plugged it in, stopped charging within 5 minutes. Whining noise coming from the passenger side front. Sounds like a seal with a spear through its belly. Looked under the car and saw about a 6inch wide missing section of the cover under the car. Thought it was just plastic, but apparently it was the metal armor that protects the battery. Tried to get it towed through roadside in the morning, but they wanted to charge me $275 for a 20 mile tow. Refused that and called my insurance company. Ended up with a $30 bill for the flatbed tow that came 2 hours later. They brought it to the local Tesla dealership. I called the dealership before the car was towed and asked them if I should have attempted to drive the car there to which they told me not to.

The car arrived and it was still whining, apparently trying to pump coolant that wasn't in there anymore. The dealership thought that I had probably broken the cooling neck that extends off of the battery and sits behind the passenger wheel under the car. Upon further inspection, they discovered that the armor protecting the battery had been destroyed and told me that the lithium cells were visible inside. They had to store the battery outside because they told me it was a fire hazard.

I've had the car in the shop a few times over the last two months for a trunk leak, windshield replacement (twice), and windshield wiper replacement because of wind noise, so I've driven a 2016 X and 2017 S - both of which have very dated tech compared to my '22 Y. I asked for the newest vehicle in the loaner fleet and they gave me a M3 Standard Plus (which is a blast to drive with how nimble and lightweight it is compared to my MYP [which I friggin love]).

Dealership called me ten minutes after I left and sent me some pictures as well as the finding that the battery would have to be replaced ($16k plus labor was the unofficial estimate from the dealership. Still waiting for the adjuster to get there to take a look and approve the payment. Fortunately collision covers road debris and all I'm (hopefully) going to be responsible for is the deductible with insurance. They told me I'd be getting a new battery versus a refurb based on the fact that the car is a '22 model year.

I picked this thing up in November Last year and it is an amazing vehicle. Quality control is definitely lacking in some small areas, but overall, the car is a blast to drive. I only work three to four days a week, so I never have to use a super charger unless I go on a long trip. I live in an apartment building, so I don't have the ability to install the Tesla charging adapter. The car only gets charged by a standard wall outlet that gives me about 1.5% battery per hour, and even though I drive about 1.5k miles per month, I only ever dip into the 20% battery range and always make it back up to 80% during the week.

See attached pictures for the damage. Fortunately it was only under the vehicle, nothing on the front or under the front bumper from what I could tell. Try to avoid driving over anything in the road, or you might find yourself having to get a new battery. On the flip side, I guess if you want a new battery, you just have to hit something hard enough to break the cooling neck (since they cannot replace that part individually), and then only have to pay the insurance deductible. A hell of a lot cheaper than $16k plus labor out of pocket.
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Pianewman

2021 MYLR VIN 88,XXX, Rd/Wh, 12/20 delivery
Supporting Member
Oct 28, 2020
2,146
1,811
Fort Worth
Sorry about this ordeal. I have to say that if I had hit something, and all those alerts popped up, I wouldn't have continued to drive the car, but that's just me. The fact that the battery WAS damaged (no coolant) and the SC wouldn't store it indoors, because of the fire hazard, is indicative of the risks involved.

As for your insurance coverage, I'd like to tell you my experience when I crashed (2014 Toyota Avalon Hybrid) into a large shoebox sized chunk of concrete.

My conversation with insurance agent. "Was the road debris sliding on the ground, or was it airborne?"

Me: "The debris was tossed in front of my car by the car in front of me. Based on the fact that the entire damage to the car was ABOVE the front bumper, smashed through the grill and damaged the inverter radiator, the debris was airborne."

Agent: "Well, that's good news for you. If the debris was sliding on the ground, you would be considered 'at fault', but since the debris was airborne, this incident is considered 'no fault."

You might find this information useful as you're filing your insurance claim. (FYI, fortunately for us, we were driving through Little Rock, quickly googled a Toyota dealership, found one 3 miles away, so the drive was brief, and the inverter coolant loss was also brief, with no overheating of the traction battery.)

( I live in TX, insurance was Farmer's.)
 
Sorry about this ordeal. I have to say that if I had hit something, and all those alerts popped up, I wouldn't have continued to drive the car, but that's just me. The fact that the battery WAS damaged (no coolant) and the SC wouldn't store it indoors, because of the fire hazard, is indicative of the risks involved.

As for your insurance coverage, I'd like to tell you my experience when I crashed (2014 Toyota Avalon Hybrid) into a large shoebox sized chunk of concrete.

My conversation with insurance agent. "Was the road debris sliding on the ground, or was it airborne?"

Me: "The debris was tossed in front of my car by the car in front of me. Based on the fact that the entire damage to the car was ABOVE the front bumper, smashed through the grill and damaged the inverter radiator, the debris was airborne."

Agent: "Well, that's good news for you. If the debris was sliding on the ground, you would be considered 'at fault', but since the debris was airborne, this incident is considered 'no fault."

You might find this information useful as you're filing your insurance claim. (FYI, fortunately for us, we were driving through Little Rock, quickly googled a Toyota dealership, found one 3 miles away, so the drive was brief, and the inverter coolant loss was also brief, with no overheating of the traction battery.)

( I live in TX, insurance was Farmer's.)
Hi Pianewman, I appreciate your tip, but I believe that New York is a no-fault state which means that regardless of who was "at fault", insurance generally reimburses everyone for everything regardless of who did what.
 

Pianewman

2021 MYLR VIN 88,XXX, Rd/Wh, 12/20 delivery
Supporting Member
Oct 28, 2020
2,146
1,811
Fort Worth
I understand, but...a $16k claim might dramatically impact your rates. That's always a problem. We never know how "good" our insurance company is until we make a claim, they happily cover it, and then raise your rates.

Progressive did that to us. My wife and I have a combined 100+ years of driving, with a total of THREE auto insurance claims. 1) rear ended at a stoplight by uninsured, 2) road debris in Little Rock 3) 2015 Leaf, impacted a truck which had unexpectedly stopped on a curve, $4500 front end damage.

Progressive paid the claim, then DOUBLED our rate the following year. Thanks, Flo!
 
I understand, but...a $16k claim might dramatically impact your rates. That's always a problem. We never know how "good" our insurance company is until we make a claim, they happily cover it, and then raise your rates.

Progressive did that to us. My wife and I have a combined 100+ years of driving, with a total of THREE auto insurance claims. 1) rear ended at a stoplight by uninsured, 2) road debris in Little Rock 3) 2015 Leaf, impacted a truck which had unexpectedly stopped on a curve, $4500 front end damage.

Progressive paid the claim, then DOUBLED our rate the following year. Thanks, Flo!
Yea, I think you're definitely right about the rates going up. Definitely not looking forward to that. Do you think that if it was somehow a not-at-fault versus an at-fault situation that the rates would not increase with one way versus the other?
 
Driving after suspicion of puncturing the battery should be really avoided if possible. In your case, the car DID tell you it’s okay to drive, but Litium ion battery is very volatile if punctured and can catch fire very easily.

Also, I wouldn’t try running over something just so I can get a new battery. 😌
 
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Driving after suspicion of puncturing the battery should be really avoided if possible. In your case, the car DID tell you it’s okay to drive, but Litium ion battery is very volatile if punctured and can catch fire very easily.

Also, I wouldn’t try running over something just so I can get a new battery. 😌
I assumed the car would have made me stop immediately if there was any possibility of battery damage having occured.

I got my actual repair estimate today for a new battery. $10k. I was surprised it was so low. Should have the car back this week or early next.

And regarding insurance fraud, that was tongue in cheek. But yea, probably easier to use a screwdriver and a hammer. xD
 
I assumed the car would have made me stop immediately if there was any possibility of battery damage having occured.

I got my actual repair estimate today for a new battery. $10k. I was surprised it was so low. Should have the car back this week or early next.

And regarding insurance fraud, that was tongue in cheek. But yea, probably easier to use a screwdriver and a hammer. xD

You are the second person I seen that has gotten a $10k quote for a new battery on a Model Y. Last year I bought 3 Powerwalls for my house. That is just 39 kWh and I paid $21k for that. Blows my mind that the Model Y battery is twice the capacity and half the price. I wonder if Tesla is selling replacements at cost.
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
18,775
46,691
Oregon
You are the second person I seen that has gotten a $10k quote for a new battery on a Model Y. Last year I bought 3 Powerwalls for my house. That is just 39 kWh and I paid $21k for that. Blows my mind that the Model Y battery is twice the capacity and half the price. I wonder if Tesla is selling replacements at cost.
They are also taking the old pack back as a core to refurbish or recycle.
 
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Sorry about this ordeal. I have to say that if I had hit something, and all those alerts popped up, I wouldn't have continued to drive the car, but that's just me. The fact that the battery WAS damaged (no coolant) and the SC wouldn't store it indoors, because of the fire hazard, is indicative of the risks involved.

As for your insurance coverage, I'd like to tell you my experience when I crashed (2014 Toyota Avalon Hybrid) into a large shoebox sized chunk of concrete.

My conversation with insurance agent. "Was the road debris sliding on the ground, or was it airborne?"

Me: "The debris was tossed in front of my car by the car in front of me. Based on the fact that the entire damage to the car was ABOVE the front bumper, smashed through the grill and damaged the inverter radiator, the debris was airborne."

Agent: "Well, that's good news for you. If the debris was sliding on the ground, you would be considered 'at fault', but since the debris was airborne, this incident is considered 'no fault."

You might find this information useful as you're filing your insurance claim. (FYI, fortunately for us, we were driving through Little Rock, quickly googled a Toyota dealership, found one 3 miles away, so the drive was brief, and the inverter coolant loss was also brief, with no overheating of the traction battery.)

( I live in TX, insurance was Farmer's.)

Yeah, the same conversation happened last week for me. A 3‘x3’ plywood board flew up next to me and ahead of me, flew into the top of my 3’s bumper, damaged the top part (throwing the radar off at an angle, causing EAP to malfunction). Since the debris was flying and hit my car, I was not at fault. My rates won’t go up either. I am on GEICO.
 
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This isn't the first story I've seen (on these forums) of road debris causing battery damage on M3/Y, and I assume there's probably more of them that just don't post on these forums. It really makes me think it might be worth the investment for one of the aftermarket metal plates to shield the front underside where these battery coolant connections run, but I haven't done the research on the options yet or tried to think through how much they'll really help in such a scenario.
 
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The S and X have a titanium plate underneath, but I don't know how far that extends. At least that was the case many years ago from what I've found on the internet.
This isn't the first story I've seen (on these forums) of road debris causing battery damage on M3/Y, and I assume there's probably more of them that just don't post on these forums. It really makes me think it might be worth the investment for one of the aftermarket metal plates to shield the front underside where these battery coolant connections run, but I haven't done the research on the options yet or tried to think through how much they'll really help in such a scenario.
 

DanDi58

Active Member
Jun 22, 2020
2,265
1,824
Dayton NJ
This isn't the first story I've seen (on these forums) of road debris causing battery damage on M3/Y, and I assume there's probably more of them that just don't post on these forums. It really makes me think it might be worth the investment for one of the aftermarket metal plates to shield the front underside where these battery coolant connections run, but I haven't done the research on the options yet or tried to think through how much they'll really help in such a scenario.
I don't know, I imagine the battery is designed to warm up and be cooled with the current protection in place, Adding another layer could impact that.
 
Driving home in the New York rain the other day, I hit something on the highway. No idea what it was, but I suspect it was a part from another vehicle or possible the asphalt from the road. Smashed through the undercarriage/armor just behind the passenger front wheel. I was driving 50mph because of the poor visibility, but 30 seconds after I hit the object, all the alerts started popping up. Reduced power, low coolant, reduced HVAC functionality, speed limited to 67, 63, 57, then 53. Car told me it was safe to drive, so I took it another 15 minutes home.

Got home and plugged it in, stopped charging within 5 minutes. Whining noise coming from the passenger side front. Sounds like a seal with a spear through its belly. Looked under the car and saw about a 6inch wide missing section of the cover under the car. Thought it was just plastic, but apparently it was the metal armor that protects the battery. Tried to get it towed through roadside in the morning, but they wanted to charge me $275 for a 20 mile tow. Refused that and called my insurance company. Ended up with a $30 bill for the flatbed tow that came 2 hours later. They brought it to the local Tesla dealership. I called the dealership before the car was towed and asked them if I should have attempted to drive the car there to which they told me not to.

The car arrived and it was still whining, apparently trying to pump coolant that wasn't in there anymore. The dealership thought that I had probably broken the cooling neck that extends off of the battery and sits behind the passenger wheel under the car. Upon further inspection, they discovered that the armor protecting the battery had been destroyed and told me that the lithium cells were visible inside. They had to store the battery outside because they told me it was a fire hazard.

I've had the car in the shop a few times over the last two months for a trunk leak, windshield replacement (twice), and windshield wiper replacement because of wind noise, so I've driven a 2016 X and 2017 S - both of which have very dated tech compared to my '22 Y. I asked for the newest vehicle in the loaner fleet and they gave me a M3 Standard Plus (which is a blast to drive with how nimble and lightweight it is compared to my MYP [which I friggin love]).

Dealership called me ten minutes after I left and sent me some pictures as well as the finding that the battery would have to be replaced ($16k plus labor was the unofficial estimate from the dealership. Still waiting for the adjuster to get there to take a look and approve the payment. Fortunately collision covers road debris and all I'm (hopefully) going to be responsible for is the deductible with insurance. They told me I'd be getting a new battery versus a refurb based on the fact that the car is a '22 model year.

I picked this thing up in November Last year and it is an amazing vehicle. Quality control is definitely lacking in some small areas, but overall, the car is a blast to drive. I only work three to four days a week, so I never have to use a super charger unless I go on a long trip. I live in an apartment building, so I don't have the ability to install the Tesla charging adapter. The car only gets charged by a standard wall outlet that gives me about 1.5% battery per hour, and even though I drive about 1.5k miles per month, I only ever dip into the 20% battery range and always make it back up to 80% during the week.

See attached pictures for the damage. Fortunately it was only under the vehicle, nothing on the front or under the front bumper from what I could tell. Try to avoid driving over anything in the road, or you might find yourself having to get a new battery. On the flip side, I guess if you want a new battery, you just have to hit something hard enough to break the cooling neck (since they cannot replace that part individually), and then only have to pay the insurance deductible. A hell of a lot cheaper than $16k plus labor out of pocket.View attachment 792162View attachment 792163View attachment 792164View attachment 792165View attachment 792166View attachment 792167
I'm sorry, I'm very confused by your story. I'm a member of several other "auto" forums, and I don't understand when your car spontaneously caught on fire and turned into a burnt marshmallow? I've been told several times this will happen if you hit anything bigger than a napkin, but I don't see that part in your story anywhere? When did that part happen?
 

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