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Did I Make a Mistake Buying a Quick 220 w/L6-20 Outlet?

I got a good deal on a Quick 220 w/L6-20 outlet (assuming it was a Leaf owner) and now I'm wondering if I shouldn't have bought it. The idea was to add it to my adapter bag in case I needed it to try to get 220v @ 20amps (16A manually limited of course) in instances where two 110v outlets on 180 phase was the only option. Depending on what the in-laws have for instance this may be a viable option to more juice overnight when we go to visit.

The issue is that now that I've taken delivery I'm trying to figure out the best/cheapest way to utilize this with my current array of adapters and what not. I've done some searching around here and Google in general and I'm perplexed on the best way to go about this or if I should cut my losses, sell it and move onto something else. Be it Quick 220 with a different outlet or something else entirely.

My current load-out includes:

Gen 1 UMC w/
NEMA 14-50 adapter
NEMA 14-30 adapter
NEMA 5-15 adapter
15' 6/8awg 14-50 extension cable

I'm planning to add a 50' 5-20 extension cable with a 5-20 to 5-15 adapter to this mix as well. The thought is that I have both an extension for a 5-20 outlet as well as an adapter should I only need 5-15 but still need to get up to 50' away. I'm in the process of trying to locate a good deal on a Tesla 5-20 Gen 1 UMC adapter to complete this portion of my setup as well.

In order to keep the requirement manually set the amperage within the Tesla the obvious solution is to use the only native 20A adapter from Tesla for the UMC 1; 5-20. Since the 5-20 adapter is a single hot at 110v and then a neutral plus a ground and the L6-20 is actually two hots (total of 220v) and then a ground I don't see the easy way to create some sort adapter so I guess this is out of the question.

Maybe the next best thing is to make my own adapter from the L6-20 to the 14-30 adapter that I will have by leaving out the neutral in the adapter and then manually set the draw to 16A from within the Tesla? Maybe put a sticker on the adapter in an effort to make it more difficult to forget this last step? Dunno. *shrugs*

So... what are my options here? I would prefer using a Tesla adapter to minimize the need to manually set the amperage from the car since the car will also be driven by my wife. My guess is she would consult me before doing something she's not sure of but she has an independence streak within her that sometimes motivates her to do it herself w/o getting me involved just to prove she can. I'd like to set her up for success in this endeavor as much as possible since the result could be burning someone's house down. lol

I just want to build as comprehensive of a travel charger kit as possible out of the gate to minimize my exposure to not being prepared on a trip and I'm having second guesses as to if this L6-20 Quick 220 is the right item to add to this kit.

Thanks for the help!
 

BerTX

Active Member
Supporting Member
May 2, 2014
3,508
3,664
Texas/Washington
I got a good deal on a Quick 220 w/L6-20 outlet (assuming it was a Leaf owner) and now I'm wondering if I shouldn't have bought it. The idea was to add it to my adapter bag in case I needed it to try to get 220v @ 20amps (16A manually limited of course) in instances where two 110v outlets on 180 phase was the only option. Depending on what the in-laws have for instance this may be a viable option to more juice overnight when we go to visit.

The issue is that now that I've taken delivery I'm trying to figure out the best/cheapest way to utilize this with my current array of adapters and what not. I've done some searching around here and Google in general and I'm perplexed on the best way to go about this or if I should cut my losses, sell it and move onto something else. Be it Quick 220 with a different outlet or something else entirely.

My current load-out includes:

Gen 1 UMC w/
NEMA 14-50 adapter
NEMA 14-30 adapter
NEMA 5-15 adapter
15' 6/8awg 14-50 extension cable

I'm planning to add a 50' 5-20 extension cable with a 5-20 to 5-15 adapter to this mix as well. The thought is that I have both an extension for a 5-20 outlet as well as an adapter should I only need 5-15 but still need to get up to 50' away. I'm in the process of trying to locate a good deal on a Tesla 5-20 Gen 1 UMC adapter to complete this portion of my setup as well.

In order to keep the requirement manually set the amperage within the Tesla the obvious solution is to use the only native 20A adapter from Tesla for the UMC 1; 5-20. Since the 5-20 adapter is a single hot at 110v and then a neutral plus a ground and the L6-20 is actually two hots (total of 220v) and then a ground I don't see the easy way to create some sort adapter so I guess this is out of the question.

Maybe the next best thing is to make my own adapter from the L6-20 to the 14-30 adapter that I will have by leaving out the neutral in the adapter and then manually set the draw to 16A from within the Tesla? Maybe put a sticker on the adapter in an effort to make it more difficult to forget this last step? Dunno. *shrugs*

So... what are my options here? I would prefer using a Tesla adapter to minimize the need to manually set the amperage from the car since the car will also be driven by my wife. My guess is she would consult me before doing something she's not sure of but she has an independence streak within her that sometimes motivates her to do it herself w/o getting me involved just to prove she can. I'd like to set her up for success in this endeavor as much as possible since the result could be burning someone's house down. lol

I just want to build as comprehensive of a travel charger kit as possible out of the gate to minimize my exposure to not being prepared on a trip and I'm having second guesses as to if this L6-20 Quick 220 is the right item to add to this kit.

Thanks for the help!
I'm sure somebody has the answer you seek. I would make an adapter and set the amperage lower manually, since it would not be a normal occurrence and you'd be unlikely to forget.

What I wanted to point out is that the device will not work if the outlets are on a GFCI circuit, which is pretty universally required for outside receptacles. The code is changing to require these in new garage circuits, also. This means you will usually have to run cords through windows and doors to reach receptacles not on GFCI circuits.

To me, the odds of ever using the device would be slim. The exception might be in a rental property where you are staying for an extended period and can get the thing set up properly. But as something to carry around all the time? I doubt it would be worthwhile.
 
I'm sure somebody has the answer you seek. I would make an adapter and set the amperage lower manually, since it would not be a normal occurrence and you'd be unlikely to forget.

What I wanted to point out is that the device will not work if the outlets are on a GFCI circuit, which is pretty universally required for outside receptacles. The code is changing to require these in new garage circuits, also. This means you will usually have to run cords through windows and doors to reach receptacles not on GFCI circuits.

To me, the odds of ever using the device would be slim. The exception might be in a rental property where you are staying for an extended period and can get the thing set up properly. But as something to carry around all the time? I doubt it would be worthwhile.

Like I said, I'm not likely to forget but I'm also not the only one who's going to be driving the car. I'm trying to make this as simple as possible should I not be the one plugging it in.

As for the ground fault circuits, I'm already aware of that limitation and won't have a problem identifying these prior to even attempting to deploy.

I feel like a few of the things I have or am getting will be rarely if ever used but if I'm in a situation where I can use them and time isn't on my side I'll be glad it's in my charge kit. This was also the idea behind the Quick 220 as it's just gives me another option in the rare instance that I actually need the thing and can make it work. I'm really leaning towards just giving up on this as an option though before I even get started with it. I feel like I may have already invested too much money and brain damage into making it a viable option. At this point I'm just looking for some confirmation of this or support in making it work from those who are more in-the-know on these sorts of things than me.
 
I guess my other issue is with the "220" in the name, since it is a 240V circuit it is making...

Anyway, there has been discussion of the device on TMC a bit before, if you search for it.

I also am aware of the difference between 220v and 240v. I'm only using the manufacturer's terminology in describing this and most people will understand that for purposes of this discussion. Your issue should be taken up with them and not used to derail this conversation as I have zero affiliation with the company who named it Quick 220.

Don't take this the wrong way but If you have useful information that directly addresses my questions I would appreciate it but correcting a new member's proper use of the manufacturer's terminology, pointing out things unrelated to the question (both of which assume limited knowledge of electricity) and then telling them to just do a search when they already said they've done that extensively isn't very helpful & kind of pointless.
 

BerTX

Active Member
Supporting Member
May 2, 2014
3,508
3,664
Texas/Washington
Sorry I wasn't clear. I was in no way correcting you. My point was that the manufacturer named their product after a voltage standard that has not been used in the US for many decades, and that indicates a questionable expertise in my mind.

I was trying to help. If you don't give some information in your original post, I have no way to know that you are aware already. Don't assume someone is attacking you. We really are a helpful, well-meaning bunch.
 
Last edited:

BerTX

Active Member
Supporting Member
May 2, 2014
3,508
3,664
Texas/Washington
I couldn't agree more with the 220/240 thing but unfortunately it doesn't help with my questions.
The Quick 220 is perhaps irrelevant, as your real issue is a good way to use an L6-20 receptical. A search for "6-20" (including the quotes) gives 5,500 results with several good suggestions in the first few threads.
 
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Reactions: SW2Fiddler
The Gen1 UMC will charge on 240v delivered through a 5-20 adapter. I have an array of adapters myself and carry 75 feet of 10 gauge cable when I’m going to the boonies. The cable has a 5-20 receptical on one end, and I can swap out the other end as necessary. This will provide about 10mph charging on my S90D.
 

ewoodrick

Well-Known Member
Apr 13, 2018
5,285
4,292
Buford, GA
I got a good deal on a Quick 220 w/L6-20 outlet (assuming it was a Leaf owner) and now I'm wondering if I shouldn't have bought it. The idea was to add it to my adapter bag in case I needed it to try to get 220v @ 20amps (16A manually limited of course) in instances where two 110v outlets on 180 phase was the only option. Depending on what the in-laws have for instance this may be a viable option to more juice overnight when we go to visit.

The issue is that now that I've taken delivery I'm trying to figure out the best/cheapest way to utilize this with my current array of adapters and what not. I've done some searching around here and Google in general and I'm perplexed on the best way to go about this or if I should cut my losses, sell it and move onto something else. Be it Quick 220 with a different outlet or something else entirely.

My current load-out includes:

Gen 1 UMC w/
NEMA 14-50 adapter
NEMA 14-30 adapter
NEMA 5-15 adapter
15' 6/8awg 14-50 extension cable



I just want to build as comprehensive of a travel charger kit as possible out of the gate to minimize my exposure to not being prepared on a trip and I'm having second guesses as to if this L6-20 Quick 220 is the right item to add to this kit.

Thanks for the help!

Did you make a mistake, no. Do you really need all the options, probably no. I've driven EVs for 4 years now. While I did want to plug into my dad's house once, there was a refrigerator on the circuit and I'd throw the beaker, but it wasn't needed, I had other options.
If you haven't looked at PlugShare, there are so many freaking J-1772 plugs out there. And if you can't find one of those, any campground that supports large campers can easily charge you.
I'd generally only recommend buying extra option if you have a specific location that you need charging, but doesn't have it.


And I'm pretty sure that if you plug the Quick 220 into standard 120V plugs, you will want to limit it to about 12A, Most 120V plugs are 15A. Only the one with the optional vertical or horizontal plug is 20A
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
8,580
11,132
Boise, ID
In order to keep the requirement manually set the amperage within the Tesla the obvious solution is to use the only native 20A adapter from Tesla for the UMC 1; 5-20. Since the 5-20 adapter is a single hot at 110v and then a neutral plus a ground and the L6-20 is actually two hots (total of 220v) and then a ground I don't see the easy way to create some sort adapter so I guess this is out of the question.
I do have a Quick220 that is set up for the 15A inputs and has a 6-15 outlet output. I've only used it for testing at home but haven't had a need for it out on the road and probably won't.
But about this specific thing, you are making an assumption, that would seem to be sensible, but doesn't happen to be true, and that's a really good thing. You're thinking that you can't re-map the 240V output of the Quick220 device onto the supposedly "120V" pins of a Tesla 5-20 adapter because of the voltage being "wrong". Fortunately, the Tesla charging system doesn't care in the least which voltage is on any of the adapters or the UMC. So yeah, you can make a little pigtail of an L6-20 plug to 5-20 receptacle, and it will work perfectly for the UMC to plug into, and the car will just detect and use whatever voltage is on it--no problem. That is routinely done with the third party adapter for the TT-30 travel trailer outlets, which are 120V 30A to something like a 14-30 outlet, where you just re-map the 120V onto the 240V pins. So since the voltage is kind of a "don't care" thing, I would prioritize making sure you do match the amps, so you don't have to remember to manually dial something down.

I did decide to get the 5-15 to 6-15 version, though, just because if I'm down to the desperate level of having to use this thing, I want to be able to use either 5-15 or 5-20 outlets, whichever is available, instead of having to hope they are 5-20 outlets on the building.
 
The Quick 220 is perhaps irrelevant, as your real issue is a good way to use an L6-20 receptical. A search for "6-20" (including the quotes) gives 5,500 results with several good suggestions in the first few threads.
But Tesla doesn't make a Gen 1 6-20 adapter so then I'm left with the same problem of making it work still by adapting adapters to adapters. I'm just trying to find a clean solution to this w/o requiring too much thought by the party that will be deploying it since it may not always be me.
 
The Gen1 UMC will charge on 240v delivered through a 5-20 adapter. I have an array of adapters myself and carry 75 feet of 10 gauge cable when I’m going to the boonies. The cable has a 5-20 receptical on one end, and I can swap out the other end as necessary. This will provide about 10mph charging on my S90D.
You're saying that I can make a short adapter that will go from a L6-20 plug to a 5-20 socket making the chain work (once I source that 5-20 UMC adapter) and the UMC Gen 1 will see this as 240v @ 20A, 16A cap but automatically set by the UMC in this case, right? By my math that could get me in the 10-12mph charge rates? This might be the solution I've been looking for as I wasn't aware that I could do this if I'm reading your post right.
 
Did you make a mistake, no. Do you really need all the options, probably no. I've driven EVs for 4 years now. While I did want to plug into my dad's house once, there was a refrigerator on the circuit and I'd throw the beaker, but it wasn't needed, I had other options.
If you haven't looked at PlugShare, there are so many freaking J-1772 plugs out there. And if you can't find one of those, any campground that supports large campers can easily charge you.
I'd generally only recommend buying extra option if you have a specific location that you need charging, but doesn't have it.


And I'm pretty sure that if you plug the Quick 220 into standard 120V plugs, you will want to limit it to about 12A, Most 120V plugs are 15A. Only the one with the optional vertical or horizontal plug is 20A
I get what you're saying and as I'm new at the EV game I'm sure that I'm just being "new parent" and planning for crap that will likely never happen. One thing I can see making this a potentially useful addition to my kit is that if/when we go visit the in-laws it's in the panhandle of Nebraska. There are no Superchargers even remotely close; the last one is Cheyenne which is almost 2 hours from our destination. If you look at PlugShare you will see that the public options available are basically zero. This means that I will need to be pretty self sufficient and I know that their modular/manufactured home from the 80's has some very basic electrical. He's a building inspector for the county so if I call him up and ask a few questions I'm confident he can relay proper information so I can plan adequately but I'm thinking my options are going to be limited to the 120v non-GFI out in the attached garage where we park when we come to visit and the hope is that the newer 120b outlets in the detached where they park are 180deg out of phase and non-GFI as well. In my mind, I can string a 20A drop cord from that garage to our garage, plug it into the Quick 220 with the other going into the nearby outlet and bam! 240v @ 20A is available. The only question is how I will adapt this to the car and if I can make a 14-50 adapter I can use the adapter we already have and manually set the draw to 16A. Ideally I would be able to use the 5-20 and get it to automagically set the cap to 16A with voltage being 240v still which would be ideal if this is possible as per the previously quoted post.

Not sure on the 12A v 16A thing on the Quick 220 but I think that it splits the load to the two phases meaning you can run 16A safely since the Quick 220 itself splits the load in half for each phase of the supply. Not 100% on that but that's how I thin it is anyway.
 

brkaus

Well-Known Member
Jul 8, 2014
8,763
7,432
Austin, TX
You're saying that I can make a short adapter that will go from a L6-20 plug to a 5-20 socket making the chain work (once I source that 5-20 UMC adapter) and the UMC Gen 1 will see this as 240v @ 20A, 16A cap but automatically set by the UMC in this case, right? By my math that could get me in the 10-12mph charge rates? This might be the solution I've been looking for as I wasn't aware that I could do this if I'm reading your post right.

Everything I have read indicates this is true.

You just want to be very sure no one ever plugs anything else into the 5-20 socket. I realize you understand that, but feel it needs to be stated anyway.
 
I do have a Quick220 that is set up for the 15A inputs and has a 6-15 outlet output. I've only used it for testing at home but haven't had a need for it out on the road and probably won't.
But about this specific thing, you are making an assumption, that would seem to be sensible, but doesn't happen to be true, and that's a really good thing. You're thinking that you can't re-map the 240V output of the Quick220 device onto the supposedly "120V" pins of a Tesla 5-20 adapter because of the voltage being "wrong". Fortunately, the Tesla charging system doesn't care in the least which voltage is on any of the adapters or the UMC. So yeah, you can make a little pigtail of an L6-20 plug to 5-20 receptacle, and it will work perfectly for the UMC to plug into, and the car will just detect and use whatever voltage is on it--no problem. That is routinely done with the third party adapter for the TT-30 travel trailer outlets, which are 120V 30A to something like a 14-30 outlet, where you just re-map the 120V onto the 240V pins. So since the voltage is kind of a "don't care" thing, I would prioritize making sure you do match the amps, so you don't have to remember to manually dial something down.

I did decide to get the 5-15 to 6-15 version, though, just because if I'm down to the desperate level of having to use this thing, I want to be able to use either 5-15 or 5-20 outlets, whichever is available, instead of having to hope they are 5-20 outlets on the building.
This information is a game changer I was looking for with my post because I was erring on the side of caution/safety since you generally wouldn't want to combine those legs for devices that are physically wired to receive that 240v on separate legs and would probably let the magic smoke out.

If I'm reading what you're saying correctly, I can simply use an L6-20 plug and connect it to a 5-20 socket via heavy gauge wire by running ground to ground, combining the two legs of 120v to the single 240v of the 5-20 and then leaving the neutral on the 5-20 socket open. I could then simply plug the 5-20 adapter into the 5-20 socket I created and the UMC will see this as a 240v 20A circuit which it will automatically negotiate as a 16A connection and all will be right with the world?
 
These guys will build you a Tesla compatible adapter with whatever plug you want on the end.

Custom Adapter for Tesla Model S and X Gen 1
This is a great resource to know about & I may use them in the future but in this case for about the same money I can simply buy a 5-20 Tesla adapter and then make a L6-20 to 5-20 adapter and then have both in case I need them. So the L6-20/5-20 would be good for use with the Quick 220 or (what's more likely) there's a 5-20 outlet and I can run the 5-20 Tesla adapter either straight to it or via the 5-20 drop cord I plan to buy just to have as well. Since I'm just starting with my kit I think the latter will be a few bucks less and will give me more adapters that would be more commonly required as I'm out and aboot.

Thanks for the heads up though!
 

BerTX

Active Member
Supporting Member
May 2, 2014
3,508
3,664
Texas/Washington
Noo
This information is a game changer I was looking for with my post because I was erring on the side of caution/safety since you generally wouldn't want to combine those legs for devices that are physically wired to receive that 240v on separate legs and would probably let the magic smoke out.

If I'm reading what you're saying correctly, I can simply use an L6-20 plug and connect it to a 5-20 socket via heavy gauge wire by running ground to ground, combining the two legs of 120v to the single 240v of the 5-20 and then leaving the neutral on the 5-20 socket open. I could then simply plug the 5-20 adapter into the 5-20 socket I created and the UMC will see this as a 240v 20A circuit which it will automatically negotiate as a 16A connection and all will be right with the world?
Noooo! Danger Will Robinson!

Ground to ground, yes, but wire each of the lines from each the hots on the NEMA L6-20 to each of the terminals on the NEMA 5-20, i.e. L1 to the line side and L2 to the Neutral side.
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
8,580
11,132
Boise, ID
This information is a game changer I was looking for with my post because I was erring on the side of caution/safety since you generally wouldn't want to combine those legs for devices that are physically wired to receive that 240v on separate legs and would probably let the magic smoke out.

Yeah, that fact that the car will just detect and use whatever voltage has made these kinds of adapter situations much easier.


If I'm reading what you're saying correctly, I can simply use an L6-20 plug and connect it to a 5-20 socket via heavy gauge wire by running ground to ground, combining the two legs of 120v to the single 240v of the 5-20 and then leaving the neutral on the 5-20 socket open.

No, that is not how you wire it. You sure don't combine two of anything. You need to put the two wires that have voltage potential from one outlet type onto the two wires that have voltage potential of the other outlet type. Does that make more sense of what the goal is?


So the L6-20 has Hot1 and Hot2, which has a 240V difference. You connect those two wires onto the Hot1 and Neutral pins of the 5-20 side, because those are the wires where it is trying to see a voltage difference. Ground is always just Ground and should never be part of any of the two pins where you're trying to hook up the voltage for charging.
 

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