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Did my wheels cause me to have to replace my brakes?

salo

Member
Sep 9, 2022
9
1
CO
Hello!

I have a 2019 M3P. I bought these wheels (in 18x9) and these hub rings, with continental DWS-06+ tires (245/45 R18). I planned on using them as a second set during the colder months in Colorado.

Shortly after mounting, my brakes started to screech. I bought the car used from Tesla, so I assumed the brakes were in good condition. The SC first said they just needed to be burnished, which they did but of course the issue returned. On second visit, I had to get new brakes! I was pretty upset, but got them to knock 50% off of the replacement price since this happened within 2k miles of delivery. They put the wheels back on and the issue hasn’t returned.

But here is what I’m wondering: when I swapped back to the 20” stock wheels for the summer, discount tire didn’t return any hub rings. Could the spacers still be mounted with the stock wheels or were they just not used in the first place, which caused the original issue?

The reason I’m asking is because it’s getting colder and I need to switch out my wheels again, but im afraid to have these wheels mounted again and damage something. Contemplating just putting pilot sport all seasons on, but then that leaves me with these basically new tires and wheels I bought.

Are these wheels compatible when used with hub spacers? Are there downsides to hub spacers and could this have been the cause of my brake damage?

Thanks for any help, I really don’t know much about wheels and fitting them. I’ve tried to read as much as I can but was hoping someone could let me know what they would do in this situation: mount the 18s with hub spacer again or just go all season?
 

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salo

Member
Sep 9, 2022
9
1
CO
Ok I figured that was the case. So then is it possible that the hub spacers are still on the car when they swapped the stock wheels back on? I didn’t get them back when they did the change the first time so that was why I thought it may have had something to do with the brakes!
 
They are called hub centric, as the advertisements say they are to adapt after market wheels to your hubs. Presumably they help to stabilize your wheel on the studs. If you do not remove them when you put your stock wheels back on you will find that you cannot properly torque your wheel nuts because they will keep loosening as the smaller hub opening on the stock wheel progressively crushes the “spacer”. What happens if you do not use them I do not know as I have not yet managed to screw up in that particular fashion yet
 
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tm1v2

Active Member
Oct 18, 2021
2,424
2,119
USA
Ok thanks a lot. I bet the shop just lost them! Thanks for your help. Is there any downside to using wheels that require an adapter? Long term effects on the car?
@salo From what I've read, these are the downsides of centering rings. None is a showstopper, just things to be aware of.

1) It's one more part to keep track of, lose, or damage when swapping wheels.
2) I've read about plastic spacers deforming over time. Maybe just from brake heat from track use, not sure, but it can happen.
3) I've read about metal (aluminum alloy) spacers seizing onto hubs or wheels over time, especially on cars that experience a lot of road salt.

You already got bit by #1, so probably you'll be very careful in the future and won't let that happen again. :)

I think with metal rings you'll avoid #2 and #3. Since you're only using them with winter wheels, and swapping 2x a year, I highly doubt #3 will be an issue. I think it's more of a problem on a car that hasn't had its wheels removed for a long time.

All else being equal I definitely prefer that my wheels fit directly fit on my car, without any need for rings or spacers. But for cheap winter wheels I'd be fine with needing rings like your setup, and in fact from what I've seen, all the cheapest wheels that would make good cheap winter beaters for this car, need rings.
 
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Of note, I think I’ve got around 130-140k miles on lug-centric wheels and never had an issue. This includes racing my M3P and lots of off-road time on other vehicles. The clamping force once snug is on the order of tens of thousands of pounds once the lugs are snug; there is no shear stress on the lugs once torqued.

I have used hub-centric rings and experienced all the things @tm1v2 said, and stopped bothering probably 10 years ago.
 
Of note, I think I’ve got around 130-140k miles on lug-centric wheels and never had an issue. This includes racing my M3P and lots of off-road time on other vehicles. The clamping force once snug is on the order of tens of thousands of pounds once the lugs are snug; there is no shear stress on the lugs once torqued.

I have used hub-centric rings and experienced all the things @tm1v2 said, and stopped bothering probably 10 years ago.
Just to add to this, manufacturing tolerances have gotten much much better. It's unlikely lug-centering has been an issue for some time now.
 
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