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Did V10 possible change sensitivy to Window Obstacle?

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
6,069
4,697
MA, NH
Installed V10 last night.

Now my Drivers door Window keeps hitting an imaginary obstacle.

I hate blaming software because I suspect it's not and just a coincidence.

Now I know Tesla didn't offer "Vent Close" on Model X :( but perhaps they are still working on that (or tried to) and adjusted the obstacle sensitivity.

It was a cool wet morning, I've not had the X long. Side windows fogged up on the outside. They did on my Wife too on the same commute in a Chevy Volt. But even when I opened the door the Window would not go up. You'd think that would be a huge load off but it made no change.

It would go half way up and then back off and stop.

Finally I did manage to get it to close by nudging it an inch at a time all the way up.

I searched the forum and didn't see this exact issue, other window issues but not this.

Passenger closes fine.

After getting it to close I tried again and it would not go up in one shot.

Not sure if the dampness is causing some gasket to "bite".

I'll try it later when things warm up and dry out.

Just throwing this out there in case this is a common issue with Model X or they did tweak the sensitivity to obstacles.
 

alexdav

Supporting Member
Nov 28, 2015
213
266
Long Beach, CA
I've had this problem before and after v10 with both front windows. I think it might be temperature related. It usually just works itself out.
 

V1VrV2

Member
Mar 13, 2017
37
13
Longmont, CO
I also had this problem prior to V10 with my rear passenger (FWD) window. Mobile Service fixed it earlier this week by replacing the window regulator and recalibrating.
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
6,069
4,697
MA, NH
I managed to fix mine.

I tried

reboot.
reboot window up.
reboot window down.
Shutdown (window up and down)

Then googled around, found Model 3 reset procedure.

Hold down 15 secs (not full button down)
Hold up 15 secs (not full button up)

All still no go.

Then I read the reset FAQ for Model X on this forum (Sticky thread).

There was the same approach as Model 3 for method one.

But method two basically said to keep triggering the pinch sensor. By Bumping it downward when it was going up. Seemed pointless. But what the heck.

Next thing you know the point it would not go past moved much lower. Couple more bumps and it was back where it was. Scratching head.

Then I opened the door and put the Window up. I noticed it was to high (for closing the door). Then I did full down and normal up and it didn’t stop !!! But it was still to high for door open.

Put the window down closed the door and did the method 1/Model 3 reset procedure (Top and bottom)

Seems all good now.

Not sure the exact step that cleared it.

One thing that might have happened. I might have had the window partially open (right were it would not go past) when V10 Installed. Not sure 100% though.

It was the first drive and window use after V10 install.
 

mxnym

Member
Mar 9, 2018
904
333
Bloomington, IN
I managed to fix mine. Then I opened the door and put the Window up. I noticed it was to high (for closing the door). Then I did full down and normal up and it didn’t stop !!! But it was still to high for door open.
If this behavior persists, it probably indicates a serviceable issue (unless there is a new V10 bug). When a frameless door is open (Tesla or not), the window shouldn't go up all the way, and while I haven't checked in V10, I know that mine didn't in V8 or V9 (window tint installer had to close latch in door in order to get window to go up in order to apply tint in V8, Tesla service center damaged tint while replacing a bad regulator sometime after upgrade V9, window tint installer again/still had to close latch in door in order to get window to go up).
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
6,069
4,697
MA, NH
If this behavior persists, it probably indicates a serviceable issue (unless there is a new V10 bug). When a frameless door is open (Tesla or not), the window shouldn't go up all the way, and while I haven't checked in V10,

No kidding. The window is not going all the way up when door is open. I've had a 2011 VW CC, a Model 3 and a Model X. And I HATE frameless windows.

It did go all the way up once WHILE CALIBRATING IT with the door open. It was a clear signal that I did manage to get it into some sort of calibration mode. Because as soon as it did go that high the original problem was gone. After that I recalibrated using the "simple" method to make sure it would drop down and set the limit when open.

The Window, at the moment, is working completely normal again. Drops down when opening, goes up when closing, won't go full up when door is open, vent works and the problem that it saw a phantom obstacle is gone (my original problem, that started immediately after V10). It may have eventually cleared itself as mentioned by someone else. Might have nothing to do with V10.

I think it was a software glitch. And maybe it was because I had the window open during V10 update, not sure if I did or didn't but I could have.

I think something glitched and it felt like software.

I also suspect there is a reason for the "Reset" procedure in Model X FAQ. This isn't the first nor probably the last.

Oh, one other real weird thing happened. I was messing with the Window trying to calibrate it (going up and down a lot) and suddenly the Window stopped moving and the car said FOB not found, was sitting on the console. I had to reboot the car to get it back.
 
Last edited:

mxnym

Member
Mar 9, 2018
904
333
Bloomington, IN
I also suspect there is a reason for the "Reset" procedure in Model X FAQ. This isn't the first nor probably the last.
Not to discount the rest of your experience, but every car that I've owned with automatic windows had a calibration procedure, and in every one of them, I had to run it every time the 12V battery died. Given that, I would expect that this very similar calibration procedure does a very similar thing (store something somewhere that wasn't necessary in this case). My non-professional guess is that the windows started working again on their own because you have an intermittent problem involving a regulator and the correlation to performing the calibration was coincidental. IF the procedure were for torque sensitivity, I'd expect you to need to run it with the doors closed in order to get the thing to drive past the spots where the window was stopping as if it had hit something (unless the something it was stopping for was due to something inside the door binding).
 
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jboy210

Supporting Member
Dec 2, 2016
5,194
3,234
Northern California
Not to discount the rest of your experience, but every car that I've owned with automatic windows had a calibration procedure, and in every one of them, I had to run it every time the 12V battery died. Given that, I would expect that this very similar calibration procedure does a very similar thing (store something somewhere that wasn't necessary in this case). My non-professional guess is that the windows started working again on their own because you have an intermittent problem involving a regulator and the correlation to performing the calibration was coincidental. IF the procedure were for torque sensitivity, I'd expect you to need to run it with the doors closed in order to get the thing to drive past the spots where the window was stopping as if it had hit something (unless the something it was stopping for was due to something inside the door binding).

Yep. I do the same thing on my BMWs when the door locks fail to open for the fob. You have to do a reset with the key (turn all the way left, turn all the way right, count to 10) and that wipes all of the settings like window calibrations.
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
6,069
4,697
MA, NH
Not to discount the rest of your experience, but every car that I've owned with automatic windows had a calibration procedure, and in every one of them, I had to run it every time the 12V battery died. Given that, I would expect that this very similar calibration procedure does a very similar thing (store something somewhere that wasn't necessary in this case). My non-professional guess is that the windows started working again on their own because you have an intermittent problem involving a regulator and the correlation to performing the calibration was coincidental. IF the procedure were for torque sensitivity, I'd expect you to need to run it with the doors closed in order to get the thing to drive past the spots where the window was stopping as if it had hit something (unless the something it was stopping for was due to something inside the door binding).

They did not start "working on their own". It was stuck that way for 2 days. It was rock solid consistent too. Something glitched and using the "Public" reset procedure "fixed" it. This procedure that is listed might not be "official", and perhaps only with proper tools can the official method be used, I don't know. But it worked. As it did for someone else it may have worked itself out eventually. But my messing with it, definitely accelerated it. As soon as I saw the position it was returning at move, I knew I was close. Shortly after that the window went all the way to the top with the door open (which it shouldn't). Not sure what state it was in at that point but after that it never stopped part way again. It's work perfectly fine since, hopefully it stays that way. BTW the adhoc public reset procedure said it may take 15 attempts (obviously not official), but I managed to do in a 6 attempts and doing it while the door was open seemed to do the trick.

All cars with electric windows do not have calibrate procedures (older cars had hard wired limit switches), but probably all newer ones do. I've had electric windows for 4 decades now and have never needed to recalibrate a window. Not that it was not possible, I never needed to.

Nothing was binding and it returned at the exact point with the door open or closed.

It is interesting that, it was probably not a "recalibrate" I did because calibration point does not "Back up". All I can think of is there is some learning/safety feature that got invoked to protect the window and somehow I cleared it.
 

mxnym

Member
Mar 9, 2018
904
333
Bloomington, IN
All cars with electric windows do not have calibrate procedures (older cars had hard wired limit switches), but probably all newer ones do. I've had electric windows for 4 decades now and have never needed to recalibrate a window. Not that it was not possible, I never needed to.
I agree, I said automatic windows, not electric windows (automatic means you push and/or pull the switch to a second point after which you can release it and the window will continue to the end of its travel). Several vehicles ago, I had a 1993 Buick Park Avenue with an automatic down driver door window, and for the automatic part to function after a dead/disconnected 12V, you had to recalibrate. Every vehicle I've had since then has also had automatic windows (some down only driver only, some down only front only, some down and up all windows), and every one of those vehicles has also required recalibration for the automatic part to function after a dead/disconnected 12V battery. In all cases, the window would work fine manually after the 12V, so I've no reason to believe any electric window without an automatic function would need recalibration.
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
6,069
4,697
MA, NH
I agree, I said automatic windows, not electric windows (automatic means you push and/or pull the switch to a second point after which you can release it and the window will continue to the end of its travel). Several vehicles ago, I had a 1993 Buick Park Avenue with an automatic down driver door window, and for the automatic part to function after a dead/disconnected 12V, you had to recalibrate. Every vehicle I've had since then has also had automatic windows (some down only driver only, some down only front only, some down and up all windows), and every one of those vehicles has also required recalibration for the automatic part to function after a dead/disconnected 12V battery. In all cases, the window would work fine manually after the 12V, so I've no reason to believe any electric window without an automatic function would need recalibration.

The one click down doesn't necessarily mean "programmed" calibration points. It could just be smart enough to go until it hit's a limit switch or a bump in current. But my guess is your right. The newer "automatic" windows probably are coincident with the one touch up/down and the calibrated stop points.

"Automatic" to me, means no crank ;)
 

mxnym

Member
Mar 9, 2018
904
333
Bloomington, IN
It could just be smart enough to go until it hit's a limit switch or a bump in current.
I agree, except maybe I'd say "should" instead of "could" (even in 1993), but my experience with many different vehicles begs to differ. I don't know why, I just know that the "reset procedure" in the X sounds the same as the "calibration procedure" in the other vehicles (except for the you may have to try more than once bit). That doesn't guarantee it doesn't do more, it just makes me suspect that there is a scenario where windows won't continue moving when you fully press/pull the window buttons in the X, especially considering that Tesla presumably didn't design and build their own window control systems that would be different from everyone else's (I mean, they use someone else's steering rack, so why on Earth would they make their own electromechanical window stuff).
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
6,069
4,697
MA, NH
I agree, except maybe I'd say "should" instead of "could" (even in 1993), but my experience with many different vehicles begs to differ. I don't know why, I just know that the "reset procedure" in the X sounds the same as the "calibration procedure" in the other vehicles (except for the you may have to try more than once bit). That doesn't guarantee it doesn't do more, it just makes me suspect that there is a scenario where windows won't continue moving when you fully press/pull the window buttons in the X, especially considering that Tesla presumably didn't design and build their own window control systems that would be different from everyone else's (I mean, they use someone else's steering rack, so why on Earth would they make their own electromechanical window stuff).

It never really felt like a “calibration” to me. Not that I have much experience with it. I think it’s just an adhoc way of it clearing some sort of safety.

I have appt with Mobile Service this Friday for something unrelated and I’ll ask about it.
 

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