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Did you know - The hold brake is pressure sensitive.

Yes, that is true for all Tesla models. Applying firm pressure to the brake pedal while the car is not moving is how Brake Hold is activated.

Yup! More details from Tesla Model 3 Manual: https://www.tesla.com/sites/default/files/model_3_owners_manual_north_america_en.pdf

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I've noticed that on a steep hill it takes more pedal pressure to engage hold. I don't know how it knows but probably the accelerometers.
nope. that is not correct. It takes the same pressure as on a flat surface. And just to also say, you might know this, but accelerometers are for detecting change of acceleration or deceleration, not car incline.
 
nope. that is not correct. It takes the same pressure as on a flat surface. And just to also say, you might know this, but accelerometers are for detecting change of acceleration or deceleration, not car incline.
Huh, I also thought it took quite a bit more pressure on a decline (but not incline) to activate brake hold.
 

Manalope

Member
May 22, 2016
22
12
CA
Huh, I also thought it took quite a bit more pressure on a decline (but not incline) to activate brake hold.

Indeed it does take more pressure to activate Brake Hold on a decline (but not incline).... I believe the purpose is to allow you to roll downhill in traffic or out of a driveway without hassle
 
Huh, I also thought it took quite a bit more pressure on a decline (but not incline) to activate brake hold.
People will disagree on this because testing it is tricky, but I assure you that incline / decline makes no difference. Just experiment more and you will see. I am speaking as of version 2019.32.11. Now if there is a difference, it would be in a newer rev, but I am not aware of that change. I haven't looked at newer version code yet.
 
Indeed it does take more pressure to activate Brake Hold on a decline (but not incline).... I believe the purpose is to allow you to roll downhill in traffic or out of a driveway without hassle
I think you are confusing the pressure needed to stop a heavy car as compared to the pressure needed to activate hole mode. Yup, I could be wrong that this is a new feature change that I have not yet seen.
 
People will disagree on this because testing it is tricky, but I assure you that incline / decline makes no difference. Just experiment more and you will see. I am speaking as of version 2019.32.11. Now if there is a difference, it would be in a newer rev, but I am not aware of that change. I haven't looked at newer version code yet.
I will pay more attention to it, but as far as I know I've always felt like it was the case, as far back as when I first got the car.

Definitely could be wrong, as you say the fact that you're already applying extra pressure to just stop the car from rolling could be what I'm experiencing as extra pressure for brake hold.
 
I will pay more attention to it, but as far as I know I've always felt like it was the case, as far back as when I first got the car.

Definitely could be wrong, as you say the fact that you're already applying extra pressure to just stop the car from rolling could be what I'm experiencing as extra pressure for brake hold.
this my experience. more pressure to stop the car downhill. not more pressure to activate hold once stopped.
 
So what's the acceleration due to gravity? Yes an accelerometer can measure incline. When stopped lateral and forward/aft acceleration will measure 0. With the nose pointing down 45 degrees it is like stopping with 0707G.
Find a steep hill and you'll see. I think the car knows how much brake pressure is needed to hold the car. Or it requires you to push a little harder (% ?)after you come to a complete stop. On flat pavement I hardly notice the extra force required but uphill or downhill and I notice it.
 
People will disagree on this because testing it is tricky, but I assure you that incline / decline makes no difference. Just experiment more and you will see. I am speaking as of version 2019.32.11. Now if there is a difference, it would be in a newer rev, but I am not aware of that change. I haven't looked at newer version code yet.

You can assure all you want but you're absolutely wrong. I've tested this tons of times. It takes MUCH more pressure to engage hold if you're facing downhill compared to a flat surface. It takes MUCH less pressure to engage it if you're facing uphill compared to a flat surface. It's not even close. It's been behaving this way ever since I got the car over a year a half ago.
 
Huh, I also thought it took quite a bit more pressure on a decline (but not incline) to activate brake hold.

It seems to be context-sensitive.

Activating the hold requires the same amount of ADDITIONAL pressure every time...

If you're on a decline, you need to brake harder to actually stop... after which the usual amount of additional pressure will engage the hold.

I think about it this way:

Brake as necessary to stop.
After stopping, give it an additional push to hold.
 
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Clarification for others: Hold behaves a little different if you have creep on or off. With creep off (how I have it), it takes barely any pressure at all on flat ground to engage hold, just enough to actually... hold... the car in place.

People will disagree on this because testing it is tricky, but I assure you that incline / decline makes no difference. Just experiment more and you will see. I am speaking as of version 2019.32.11. Now if there is a difference, it would be in a newer rev, but I am not aware of that change. I haven't looked at newer version code yet.

Ours since June 2019 (when we got it) has always required more pressure on hills. This intuitively makes sense. I've actually accidentally activated hold when stopping very gradually on flat ground because it requires very little pressure to actually keep the car in place, if any. On a hill, the car would be rolling still (likely accelerating) with the same pressure as the flat case. Going downhill requires more brake pressure to hold the car, whether it's an automatic hold system or your foot.

It seems to be context-sensitive.

Activating the hold requires the same amount of ADDITIONAL pressure every time...

If you're on a decline, you need to brake harder to actually stop... after which the usual amount of additional pressure will engage the hold.

I think about it this way:

Brake as necessary to stop.
After stopping, give it an additional push to hold.

IMO this is the most accurate way of describing it, and may be why some are confused about it requiring more pressure.
 
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user212_nr

Active Member
Aug 26, 2019
1,407
884
US
Try it.

Light application of the brake at standstill wont apply the hold.

At a certain pressure it will.

Enjoy.

When I did the test drive, the guy showed me it by tapping on the screen and secretly pressing the break pedal. I did the same for the first few times (and it worked!). Realized that he only meant to indicate the location of the hold icon.
 

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