TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Different Tesla Chargers in North America and Europe

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by youyouxue, Feb 10, 2015.

  1. youyouxue

    youyouxue Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2014
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
    I'm in England, and I really wanted to bring my California Tesla P85 over here by boat. I was notified by someone that the Tesla chargers in the UK are different than the ones North America. Yes, I mean the ones you find at Tesla Superchargers and the ones included with your charging kit.

    The ones here in Europe (UK, Netherlands, Norway, etc.) have lots more prongs, and are basically 2x bigger than the US ones, which if I can remember correctly, have three prongs on top, and one on the bottom.

    IMAGE 1 (EUROPEAN PLUG): http://fr.chargemap.com/img/upload/chargepoints/large/tesla-supercharger-regensburg_14974.JPG
    IMAGE 2 (EUROPEAN PLUG): http://www.danzei.de/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Tesla_Supercharger_Stecker_mit_Knopf.jpg
    IMAGE 3 (EUROPEAN PLUG): http://insideevs.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/125.jpg

    IMAGE 4 (AMERICAN PLUG): http://d3z1rkrtcvm2b.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Filling.png
    IMAGE 5 (AMERICAN PLUG): http://michael.palm-motors.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/20120923-142007.jpg

    I find this quite ridiculous because the electricity being put out by the Superchargers across two continents are exactly the same, yet there seems to be a need to change the plug. Tesla has not been very cooperative in providing me with a solution to charge my car, if I were to bring it overseas.

    Is this to prevent customers from shipping their cars overseas? Is this to prevent Americans from damaging the European Superchargers? It doesn't quite make sense.

    Has anyone else had this experience or similar concern?
     
  2. goneskiian

    goneskiian Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2012
    Messages:
    2,010
    Location:
    Bellevue WA
  3. stopcrazypp

    stopcrazypp Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Messages:
    7,057
    Tesla is not alone, practically every EV will have a J1772 in the US/Japan and the Type 2 connector in Europe (I know some cars were released in Europe with J1772 though, but you run into the same issue).
     
    • Informative x 1
  4. arg

    arg Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2012
    Messages:
    741
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    There's lots of other issues besides the charging connector - due to regulatory requirements, there's different airbag configurations, rear fog light, turn signal colours etc.

    If you are just thinking of bringing the car over here temporarily, you will easily be able to charge it (just not at superchargers).

    If you are thinking of importing it permanently, it's probably going to be a lot of trouble/cost to get it registered, it's left-hand-drive when you want RHD for the UK, and when you eventually come to sell it you won't get a good price. You almost certainly save money by selling your US P85 and buying another one over here.
     
  5. jkirkebo

    jkirkebo Model S P85+ VIN 14420 EU

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    950
    Location:
    Fredrikstad, Norway
    There are lots of EVs with Type 1 (J1772) connectors in Europe (like the Leaf) but since they all have single phase chargers it doesn't matter. Just use a Type 1->Type 2 cable instead of the Type 2->Type 2 that the cars with Type 2 ports use. Fast charging is separate anyway, by means of CHAdeMO for the Type 1 cars. So no issues for Type 1 cars in Europe. A Type 2 car in the US would not work well however, due to US charging points having fixed cables instead of an outlet.
     
  6. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2013
    Messages:
    3,038
    Location:
    Delaware
    As I understand it, the signaling is the same. That being the case, there's no reason a European car couldn't use a simple dumb adapter to charge on US J1772 plugs - the same way the US Tesla uses a dumb adapter.

    The bigger issue would be charge rates - as I understand it, the European charger designed for three phase power is made up of three smaller chargers each limited to 16 Amps (vs the single larger module of the US single phase charger rated for 40 Amps.)

    The obvious way of hooking it together would leave the European car limited to a single charger module and 40% of the speed of the US car. I don't know if the wiring is such that all three modules could be paralleled by the dumb adapter.
    Walter
     
  7. GreenT

    GreenT Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2014
    Messages:
    292
    Location:
    Here
    You will void your warranty.
     
  8. wonko

    wonko Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2014
    Messages:
    58
    Location:
    Germany
    The European system uses three phases at 240V each when charging in AC mode. Three phases are quite uncommon in the U.S. . In domestic areas, it's usually one phase at 110V, sometimes two that can be coupled to generate 240V. The five main pins in the European Type 2 connector are protective earth, neytral, and those three phases. With a single charger, Teslas can charge 16Amps or 11kW using all three phases, and with a double charger, well, it's double.

    DC charging at the SuC is an entirely different thing. Here, the electronics in the car are no longer used, but the charger is in the SuC-station (which explains, why SuC stations cost more than an AC charger by a factor of 50!). DC charging is pretty much the same in the U.S. and in Europe, except that the European fiv-prong plug combines two prongs each for + and - DC.
     
  9. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Messages:
    7,019
    An EU car can charge in the US without a problem - the single-phase power is tied to all inputs on the car, and you adjust amperage accordingly (you'd have to set 13A three-phase on the car to get 39A on the single-phase).

    A US car can only charge at 32A in Europe, because of the single-phase charger.
     
  10. DustinDep

    DustinDep Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2016
    Messages:
    10
    Location:
    93505
    Did you ever bring yours over?
     
  11. arg

    arg Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2012
    Messages:
    741
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    It doesn't work that way: the car detects whether it is true three-phase or just single phase applied in parallel and interprets the pilot accordingly - if you supply single phase and a 32A pilot, it will draw 32A in total (I haven't measured to see if it draws 2x16A with the third input unused or 3x10.6A), while if you supply actual three-phase and the same 32A pilot, it will draw 32A from each of the phases (assuming 2nd charger fitted).

    I have not seen any reports of what happens if you supply single phase and a pilot above 32A - the website spec for the EU cars originally mentioned single phase at some high figure, but that's since disappeared and I'm not sure if it was ever implemented. EVSE for single phase >32A is not generally available here.
     

Share This Page