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Disappointed in the media situation so far (No CD player in Model S)

Skotty

2014 S P85 | 2020 3 P19"
Jun 27, 2013
2,572
2,012
Kansas City, MO
While I think we could all do without a CD player for CD music, there is still an argument to have a DVD player that can play video discs (audio-only is fine). Probably not too many people like me, but I frequently listen to movies and stand-up comedy DVDs in my 2012 Volt. That is a feature I will miss when I switch to a Tesla (without rigging up some portable DVD player through an input jack or something). Until you can legally carry movies around on flash drives, the spinning disks will still have a place. I would like to see a DVD player be an add-on extra (and if it can play DVD video, it might as well play CD audio too).
 

dmunjal

Active Member
Aug 17, 2012
1,196
1,383
While I think we could all do without a CD player for CD music, there is still an argument to have a DVD player that can play video discs (audio-only is fine). Probably not too many people like me, but I frequently listen to movies and stand-up comedy DVDs in my 2012 Volt. That is a feature I will miss when I switch to a Tesla (without rigging up some portable DVD player through an input jack or something). Until you can legally carry movies around on flash drives, the spinning disks will still have a place. I would like to see a DVD player be an add-on extra (and if it can play DVD video, it might as well play CD audio too).

I would prefer an HDMI input or even Airplay support to the screen over a DVD player.
 
The advantage is you can store a few thousand songs on a small USB drive and not have to shuffle through multiple CDs while you are driving.

Just for the record (pun not intended), I don't have to shuffle through CDs while driving, that is what my changer is for. And nothing is cluttering my interior. The changer is in the trunk, the CD cases are back at home of course. After all, why should I take them with me? I load my changer at home every few weeks, no prob. Perhaps I should mention that I don't want to constantly change my music. I choose my favorite (for some time) six albums, load my changer, then I listen to them in the following weeks. There is still not much repetition, as my daily drive to the nearest train station is not very long. At about three songs each way, about 90 to 120 songs (6 times 15 to 20 tracks), I can listen to different songs for between two and three weeks without having to listen to one song twice. Of course I skip a few songs, but still.

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According the the local police department, the number one reason cars are broken into is to steal CDs. They're the perfect theft item. Easy to fence and untraceable. I'm just as glad there is no CD player.

I thought CDs were a thing of the past? Why would a thief want to steal them if no one wants such old tech anymore? :tongue:

As in:

+1. CDs were a nightmare for us.

... I think we could all do without a CD player for CD music...

I haven't actually listened to a physical CD in years though so it isnt something that I miss at all.

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Why are you assuming that you have to convert/compress the audio when transferring it from CD/SACD to USB key?

Because up until now I didn't know of any car that could play tracks other than in mp3 format.
 

brianman

Burrito Founder
Nov 10, 2011
17,618
3,223
Because up until now I didn't know of any car that could play tracks other than in mp3 format.
Ah, ok.

For reference, Tesla officially says...
200 watt, seven speaker stereo system with AM/FM/HD radio. Supports MP3, AAC, and MP4 music formats. System includes four speakers, two tweeters and one center channel speaker.
Model S Specs | Tesla Motors

... but before the production vehicles were on the road we already verified that the betas supported raw WAV, some flavors of WMA (including lossless), FLAC, etc.
 
Just for the record (pun not intended), I don't have to shuffle through CDs while driving, that is what my changer is for. And nothing is cluttering my interior. The changer is in the trunk, the CD cases are back at home of course. After all, why should I take them with me? I load my changer at home every few weeks, no prob. Perhaps I should mention that I don't want to constantly change my music. I choose my favorite (for some time) six albums, load my changer, then I listen to them in the following weeks. There is still not much repetition, as my daily drive to the nearest train station is not very long. At about three songs each way, about 90 to 120 songs (6 times 15 to 20 tracks), I can listen to different songs for between two and three weeks without having to listen to one song twice. Of course I skip a few songs, but still.

Of course you can't listen to any of that music at home during that time, but OK. It definitely seems to me that failing to see the advantage of having all your music available at all times (both at home and in the car) is just being stuck in your ways just because you don't want to change.
 

dsm363

Roadster + Sig Model S
Moderator
May 17, 2009
18,280
162
Nevada
Just for the record (pun not intended), I don't have to shuffle through CDs while driving, that is what my changer is for. And nothing is cluttering my interior. The changer is in the trunk, the CD cases are back at home of course. After all, why should I take them with me? I load my changer at home every few weeks, no prob. Perhaps I should mention that I don't want to constantly change my music. I choose my favorite (for some time) six albums, load my changer, then I listen to them in the following weeks. There is still not much repetition, as my daily drive to the nearest train station is not very long. At about three songs each way, about 90 to 120 songs (6 times 15 to 20 tracks), I can listen to different songs for between two and three weeks without having to listen to one song twice. Of course I skip a few songs, but still.

Thieves would steal your CDs because then they could rip them and put the songs on a thumb drive or iPod I guess.

I think this thread may have reached its conclusion. You want a CD player and most others don't which is fine. Hopefully you can find some way to pipe your CDs into the Model S if you decide to get one. Of course one can't listen to more than 10 CDs on a normal trip but most people don't listen to more than a few songs from each CD and also want to listen to different music at different times. Having a few hundreds CDs instantly available seems more convenient to me but you disagree.
 
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- sustainability: including a cd player implies supporting a technology that uses disposable discs that in aggregate are a non-trivial pollution
To me, that’s a good and valid point. I actually can’t remember when I bought my last CD, and I just can’t think of a reason why I would buy another. My CD-collection just seems like another meaningless pile of unsustainable plastic. In fact, since quite a while back I try to steer clear as much as I possibly can from all things plastic…

So.., I’m wholeheartedly with the Model S crowd.

If I had the money and absolutely needed a car I would probably be jumping up and down by now in anticipation of my new Model S 85 on it’s way to my anxious arms. A CD-drive or not wouldn’t make any difference whatsoever. Because the more of the Model S Tesla sells, the faster the Tesla GEN3 – or something equivalent – will appear on this planet (Though I guess in a perfect world that would be the size of an Audi A3 wagon… But hopefully one day not too far away that’ll also be a reality.).
 
Dear Everyone, Can I please have all your cds? You obviously don't care about having them anymore and I love collecting CDs!

I started to transfer some of my itunes files onto my measly 4 gig thumb drive. it was so slow! but when I woke up I had 4 gigs of music to listen to in my car! pretty cool. I have my 500 gig slim hard drive enroute so hopefully once I get that, I can actually listen to the music I like and not stupid slacker radio shuffling.

Thanks.
 

jerry33

(S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20
Supporting Member
Mar 8, 2012
20,561
27,829
Texas
To me, that’s a good and valid point. I actually can’t remember when I bought my last CD, and I just can’t think of a reason why I would buy another. My CD-collection just seems like another meaningless pile of unsustainable plastic. In fact, since quite a while back I try to steer clear as much as I possibly can from all things plastic…

Most of the songs I have on my thumb drive only come on CDs. If I could download them rather than purchase CDs, I would.
 

neroden

Model S Owner and Frustrated Tesla Fan
Apr 25, 2011
14,676
63,888
Ithaca, NY, USA
T
I can fit my entire CD collection in a flash drive that is the size of my thumbnail. Ripping your collection will take a lot of effort.
I'm retaining CDs as an archival format -- they have a good reputation for lasting for decades (which flash drives do not). However, ripping my collection... well, my fiancee was ripping about one every 30 seconds using the program "k3b". It was the opposite of "a lot of effort". It was easy.

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... but before the production vehicles were on the road we already verified that the betas supported raw WAV, some flavors of WMA (including lossless), FLAC, etc.

Given that it's running Linux, you should expect that any *free to implement* format will be supported natively -- it costs them nothing. So that includes WAV, AIFF, FLAC. I haven't tested Ogg though...

I can hear some stuff which most people can't, so I use FLAC ("free lossless audio compression") for most of my rips. I use raw .wav when I need to do some tweaking with an audio editor, which is sometimes necessary for CDs with really odd track setups.

See, Tesla has one serious defect in their music player. It stutters between tracks. This makes it hard to play symphony albums, or pop albums which segue directly from one track into the next, unless you glue the entire album together into one file. Most CD rippers will default to ripping into individual tracks, even the ones which handle the pre-gap correctly (and I would never use one which dind't handle pregap correctly).
 

trils0n

2013 P85
Feb 12, 2013
1,529
1,982
Earth
See, Tesla has one serious defect in their music player. It stutters between tracks. This makes it hard to play symphony albums, or pop albums which segue directly from one track into the next, unless you glue the entire album together into one file. Most CD rippers will default to ripping into individual tracks, even the ones which handle the pre-gap correctly (and I would never use one which dind't handle pregap correctly).

I would love gapless playback! This is one of the few things that bugs me about the car. Every piece of music player software I've ever used has had an option for gapless playback, so hopefully it will come as a software update.
 
Sorry in advance for the massive post. I can't believe the level of disrespect that's being shown to the Original Poster of this thread. People are allowed to start a thread on anything they want… your time is not wasted if you accidentally click on a thread title, it is your choice to do so. The OP just wants to play CDs from time to time and cannot. Why are people calling him crazy? Why are people saying CDs are a thing of the past? Why are people advising him to rip his CDs first instead?

If I was taking someone on a road trip in the Model S and they stepped into my car with five CDs in hand… should I exclaim "Get outta my car with those things, dude! This is the car of the future, not the past!" Of course not. We should simply be able to play CDs if they are presented.

However on the $100,000 Tesla Model S (whose price is probably at the 99th percentile of car prices), you can't do anything with them. Every other car on the market has a CD player. The person stepping into your car just assumes it will too, it ain't their fault you spent your $100,000 on a Tesla Model S.

The Original Poster did not say "I hate the idea of playing digital files, I ONLY want to play CDs!" but some people here have reacted as if that's what he said. The Original Poster probably has a bunch of digital files, and knows how to get the car to play them. They just want to be able to put a CD into the slot as well, now and again.

Let's remind everyone that CDs contain, by default, the highest-quality music format that is currently sold. (putting SACD & DVD-A to one side) iTunes, Spotify, Sirius/XM, Pandora et. al all sell music files whose quality is BELOW this. Even if it is indeed more convenient to find anything from Pink Floyd to Daft Punk, those services don't sound as good as a CD does, and that matters to some people. Ya know, it might matter more than you think to buyers of the Tesla Model S, who are spending $70,000 or more on a car.

There is no doubt that the Model S is a fantastic car and we're all thankful that Tesla put it out on the market. However we know their profit margins are razor thin and the car is lean on frills - they are even trying to downgrade or remove things from the car as long as it doesn't cause a revolt among customers! (fog lights are an example)

Some years ago there must have been a conversation like this -

Engineer: We've been looking at the cost of building the Model S for $49,900 and it simply won't make a profit.
Musk: It needs to be profitable, even if only by one dollar, otherwise our investors will crucify us on the stock market for producing a loss-making car. It's a deathbed we can't get out of… no matter how many cars we make, they're all making a loss!!!
Engineer: the only way we can do that is strip everything out of the car we don't need… and this also means reducing the number of parts required to put the car together, as it will take less time to make the car
Musk: well maybe we can forget to build in a lot of things like door pockets, cup holders, clothes hooks, lighted vanity mirrors, a CD player, extra 12V sockets and USB sockets, and analogue audio input
Engineer: some customers may not like all that, when it costs over $50K and maybe up to $100K but yes, maybe we can make $1 of profit on each car if we don't have all those extra parts
Musk: we all know they're interested in the car because it's electric… not because it has lots of dual 12V sockets and lighted vanity mirrors etc.

And so there we have it. The CD player is not present because it represents extra parts, pieces and labour time required to make the car. CD players aren't even expensive, they're dirt cheap. They were simply eliminated from the design by prioritisation.

This is a tragedy for audiophiles. The Tesla Model S is the quietest car available today, so the noise floor over which you would play your music is super-low, allowing for an amazing audio experience. The tragedy is twofold: Tesla does not provide a solution as an option (doesn't have to be packed up with other stuff, it can be separate like the $250 rear cargo cover); and there doesn't appear to be anything on the market that we can use to get the car to play a CD. I wish either one of those was not true. I do not mind that the Tesla Model S ships the way it does. And I am a regular user of digital files, my personal music collection which includes a lot of film scores is about 650GB of lossless files. But I do have CDs, I buy CDs even now, and the music I want to play is on either digital media or discs.

Why do I buy CDs? 1) they sound better than the music that us sold on iTunes and 2) it is cheaper. Better and cheaper! Pretty convincing argument. Here is an example of cheaper: (Not sure if this link will work)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...ft+punk+random+access+memories&condition=used
That is the latest album by Daft Punk, all 13 tracks for just $6.16. All you have to to is rip it lossless to your collection and you have the entire album, sounding better than any service you can buy it on, for the price of about 5 lossy tracks that are sold to you for $1.29 each. Yes there is postage fees, but you get my point. CDs are still a realistic solution even in 2013.

Some people want the best, and that is why they are driving the Tesla. They also want the best quality music they can find… and CDs provide that.

I've looked all over for ways to hook up a player (even a laptop with a drive) into the USB socket as if the player is a USB memory drive, and none appear to exist.

There are plenty of external optical disc readers (and I love my Sony BDX-S600U) but only computers with software drivers can use them. As an earlier poster pointed out, Tesla will have to write some software for their Android-based system to recognize an audio CD if it's in a player plugged into a USB socket. THAT WOULD BE FRIKKIN' AMAZING, TESLA, PLEASE DO IT. And it would put the CD discussion to rest, because if you want to do it, you can do it, and it isn't affecting the cost of the car.
 
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There really isn't a good place to put a CD player or a changer in the model S and though CDs are cheap and sound superior to MP3s they're disappearing. Tesla is not alone in not having a CD player. My father's Fisker Karma lacks a CD player as well. He has the added disadvantage in that unlike my Tesla he can't play FLAC lossless audio compressed files (plus the interface to the media player is horrible). I would suggest contacting ownership and suggest adding support for USB CD/DVD players for media. Since it runs Linux it should be relatively easy to support. I have an inexpensive USB DVD ROM drive that I use for my netbook.

CD players in cars have been disappearing for a few years now. It's just more convenient to store a large collection on a thumb drive than a CD and most consumers can't seem to tell the difference between a low bitrate MP3 and good uncompressed audio.

I have been slowly going through my CD collection and converting everything to flac audio files. The beauty of that is that flac is a lossless compression scheme so there is no loss in fidelity. If I need MP3, it's trivial to convert.
 

dsm363

Roadster + Sig Model S
Moderator
May 17, 2009
18,280
162
Nevada
Sorry in advance for the massive post. I can't believe the level of disrespect that's being shown to the Original Poster of this thread. People are allowed to start a thread on anything they want… your time is not wasted if you accidentally click on a thread title, it is your choice to do so. The OP just wants to play CDs from time to time and cannot. Why are people calling him crazy? Why are people saying CDs are a thing of the past? Why are people advising him to rip his CDs first instead?

No one called him crazy. Can you point to the post? You actually end up making our point with the rest of your post and that is you can accomplish the same quality with a lossless format. I buy CDs as well for the same reason so that I can rip them in a lossless format, have a copy in my car on the USB drive, and keep the CD out of my car as a backup if something ever happens to the drive. The very first thing I do when a CD arrives is put it in my computer to get the lossless format on my computer. Takes 30 seconds of my time.

I seriously doubt the decision was make over a $1 profit. This really is the car of the future and a design decision was made that CDs really aren't used much anymore now that most people have their music as digital files on their iPod/iPhone/mobile phone....etc

If Tesla supports a plug in CD player over USB that would be great. No one said that shouldn't be allowed just that they didn't think it was needed as a default. As aaronw said, there really isn't a good place to put it in the car unless you wanted to put a CD changer in the trunk.

The Model S isn't the only car without a CD player but is part of a growing trend.
CD Players Make Slow Exit From New Cars - KickingTires
 

Skotty

2014 S P85 | 2020 3 P19"
Jun 27, 2013
2,572
2,012
Kansas City, MO
I've never seen a car with a sound system that didn't have a physical media player (be it tape, CD, DVD, 8-track, whatever). For years now, most aftermarket radios and most factory ones as well have had aux audio in ports, which essentially gives you universal support for pretty much anything that didn't come with your car. It sounds like the Model S doesn't have that either? I really think that if they are going to leave out the CD/DVD player, they should at least have an aux audio in port.

An example of why a simple USB port is possibly not quite good enough would be Ford cars with the Sync system. When you put a thumb drive in, it spends quite some time indexing all the music, which is great once it's in place. But sometimes you want to just take a few new songs or some other temporary audio thing out to the car for a day. You don't really want to switch out the thumb drive as then it will have to re-index everything again, plus you can't easily switch back to your main music collection easily. Better just to throw your temporary audio stuff on a CD and use the CD player for it. If you finish listening to it before your trip is over, you just switch inputs back to your main music on the thumb drive. Easy and effective. (note that a manufacturer could also provide multiple USB slots for multiple drives as another advanced option, though I have never seen that offered to date).

With a Model S, it sounds like you are limited to switching out the thumb drive. Okay, given it's an early adopter car that still has some limits, but nonetheless, a cheap Ford with Sync has a better system. Personally, given how much Tesla has done with the Model S and how great a car it is, I can accept that as a minor limitation, but I wouldn't defend it; not if they don't at least have an aux in port.
 

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