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Disengaging AP is too jerky

vpulipati

New Member
Feb 9, 2021
3
0
CA
Hello all!
I'm a new owner of model Y. I'm still learning about the car, trying to get used to various Autopilot quirks. There's one thing that's been bothering me quite a bit, and it's the way the car gives a jerk when disengaging AP. I'm referring to the mode that you get into by double push of right stock. I tried several ways of disengaging- pushing the stock up, applying brakes, and steering force. The first two methods are totally ok, but the last method (steering force) is pretty scary.
The first time I tried, the car wanted to change the lane and I decided not to. So, I resisted by holding the steering tight. It did disengage AP but with such a jerk that I struggled to stay in the lane straight. It was a pretty scary experience. Over a few weeks of time, I tested that method a number of times (sometimes resisting to change and sometimes forcing to change) and the behavior was consistent every time.

I took it to Tesla service center for inspection, and after the test, they said, to my disbelief, that the behavior is normal! While I was waiting there I requested for a test drive of another model Y and they did let me. The car I test drove didn't behave erratically like mine. It was smooth. I told them that but they didn't think mine was too jerky. They recommended using the first two methods which is fine but I'm not willing to accept something that doesn't feel normal with my brand new car.

I'm wondering if any of you feel the jerkiness with autopilot especially when disengaging by steering force. Is that something you get used to over time? Is there a setting that makes a difference? I'm scheduled to go back to service center again in 10 days, and I'm trying to find out what others' experiences are. Any advice would be helpful. Thanks!
 

Puma2020

Member
Jun 16, 2020
396
409
New Hampshire, USA
Yes, it takes practice to take back control over AP without jerking. I sometimes wonder if at some point in the future, the AI will refuse to give me control! :) Hopefully by then the AI will have Asimov's 3 laws built in!
Plus remember that most of us do not have the latest and greatest FSD code. Hopefully soon.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
2,097
2,063
Maryland
When you have Basic Autopilot (what comes with the Tesla by default) you need to disengage the Autopilot before changing lanes. If your Tesla has the Enhanced Autopilot option then the Tesla vehicle will change lanes when you turn on the turn signal and it is safe to do so. Tesla sometimes lets owners upgrade their Tesla, for a price, to Enhanced Autopilot. Note that Enhanced Autopilot is not the same as Full Self Driving (FSD).
 

Need

Active Member
Nov 22, 2017
2,912
2,209
SoCal
I never use the steering wheel to disengage except in emergency, like when the car in the next lane just ahead starts to sway into my lane. I rarely uses the brake to disengage either. I only use it when I see far away that all the cars have suddenly slowed but my car is going full speed. For voluntary AP disengagement, I only use the stalk.

The only problem with the stalk disengagement is that when I drive my wife's Model X, sometime I put it in Natural when I thought I was disengaging AP in the middle of the freeway.... oops.
 
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Reactions: pilotSteve

mark95476

Active Member
Jun 21, 2020
1,216
644
Bay Area CA
That's normal. The computer will ask you to nudge on the steering wheel every 30 seconds on so while AP is engaged if you're not holding the wheel. Do you expect it to disengage autopilot?

If you can't control your car doing something, then don't do it.
If something scares you, then don't do it.

Hello all!
I'm a new owner of model Y. I'm still learning about the car, trying to get used to various Autopilot quirks. There's one thing that's been bothering me quite a bit, and it's the way the car gives a jerk when disengaging AP. I'm referring to the mode that you get into by double push of right stock. I tried several ways of disengaging- pushing the stock up, applying brakes, and steering force. The first two methods are totally ok, but the last method (steering force) is pretty scary.
The first time I tried, the car wanted to change the lane and I decided not to. So, I resisted by holding the steering tight. It did disengage AP but with such a jerk that I struggled to stay in the lane straight. It was a pretty scary experience. Over a few weeks of time, I tested that method a number of times (sometimes resisting to change and sometimes forcing to change) and the behavior was consistent every time.

I took it to Tesla service center for inspection, and after the test, they said, to my disbelief, that the behavior is normal! While I was waiting there I requested for a test drive of another model Y and they did let me. The car I test drove didn't behave erratically like mine. It was smooth. I told them that but they didn't think mine was too jerky. They recommended using the first two methods which is fine but I'm not willing to accept something that doesn't feel normal with my brand new car.

I'm wondering if any of you feel the jerkiness with autopilot especially when disengaging by steering force. Is that something you get used to over time? Is there a setting that makes a difference? I'm scheduled to go back to service center again in 10 days, and I'm trying to find out what others' experiences are. Any advice would be helpful. Thanks!
 

mark95476

Active Member
Jun 21, 2020
1,216
644
Bay Area CA
What makes Tesla's AP so bad and what are the better implementations?

- No one is forced to use autopilot.
- There are multiple ways of disengaging autopilot. OP is well aware of them.
- OP is purposely choosing one method and complaining about it.

When coming to a stop light, if I see a lane open up I'll sometimes take over by yanking on the wheel to switch lanes manually. Autosteer gets disabled, but cruise control is still set. We're all physically different, but I've never felt like my car is out of my control.

This is a common complaint and, IMO, it is one of the worst things about autopilot. Other manufacturers have much smoother implementations.
 
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Carbonfiber

Member
Aug 2, 2020
165
40
Los Angeles
Hello all!
I'm a new owner of model Y. I'm still learning about the car, trying to get used to various Autopilot quirks. There's one thing that's been bothering me quite a bit, and it's the way the car gives a jerk when disengaging AP. I'm referring to the mode that you get into by double push of right stock. I tried several ways of disengaging- pushing the stock up, applying brakes, and steering force. The first two methods are totally ok, but the last method (steering force) is pretty scary.
The first time I tried, the car wanted to change the lane and I decided not to. So, I resisted by holding the steering tight. It did disengage AP but with such a jerk that I struggled to stay in the lane straight. It was a pretty scary experience. Over a few weeks of time, I tested that method a number of times (sometimes resisting to change and sometimes forcing to change) and the behavior was consistent every time.

I took it to Tesla service center for inspection, and after the test, they said, to my disbelief, that the behavior is normal! While I was waiting there I requested for a test drive of another model Y and they did let me. The car I test drove didn't behave erratically like mine. It was smooth. I told them that but they didn't think mine was too jerky. They recommended using the first two methods which is fine but I'm not willing to accept something that doesn't feel normal with my brand new car.

I'm wondering if any of you feel the jerkiness with autopilot especially when disengaging by steering force. Is that something you get used to over time? Is there a setting that makes a difference? I'm scheduled to go back to service center again in 10 days, and I'm trying to find out what others' experiences are. Any advice would be helpful. Thanks!

I had the same experience when I first got the car. It’s normal and you will get used to it. It’s basically like when you are pulling on a rope and the other person at the other end just decided to let go.
 

Tedkidd

Member
What makes Tesla's AP so bad and what are the better implementations?

- No one is forced to use autopilot.
- There are multiple ways of disengaging autopilot. OP is well aware of them.
- OP is purposely choosing one method and complaining about it.

When coming to a stop light, if I see a lane open up I'll sometimes take over by yanking on the wheel to switch lanes manually. Autosteer gets disabled, but cruise control is still set. We're all physically different, but I've never felt like my car is out of my control.


But in this society where everyone is competing to be the biggest victim, don't we need to practice a lot?...
 
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ratsbew

Active Member
Mar 3, 2012
1,282
947
O'Fallon, IL
I use up on the stalk for most planned disengagements, but it's totally possible to use steering wheel without anyone knowing other than the bing-bong. You just have to be gentle. I drive with my elbows braced on the door armrest and center armrest so I have a very stable platform for following the wheel's movements and you can apply torque and counter torque with your left and right hands so that it doesn't jerk.
 
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WattsappMTL

Member
Nov 2, 2020
113
63
Montreal
There's no way to avoid the jerk if you just try to disengage Autosteer with the wheel. Turn signal reduces the turning force required to disengage it but if you're not intending to change lanes then just move the right stalk up to disengage both TACC and Autosteer, then immediately back down once to re-engage just the TACC speed control.
 

Jeffrey1.0

New Member
Feb 9, 2021
1
0
Virginia
What I’ve been doing is actually stepping on the accelerator then disengaging AP through stalk to avoid the jerk. Been working so far. Hope this helps!
 

jsight

Member
Apr 5, 2018
594
390
Charleston
No, you can forcefully disengage in that situation.

Under normal lane changes, use the turn signal.

Do you need help on how to use the brakes as well?

Yes, after driving a Tesla for a few weeks, I have nearly forgotten what that other pedal is for. :D

More seriously, I can do it, but I don't find anything about the process to be smooth. I've started to note the same issue among some reviewers, in particular Out of Spec, and it sounds like other manufacturers have solutions. I hope that it improves.
 

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