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Diy ceramic coat after professional paint correction

Title summarizes it. I just cannot justify spending $1,500+ on a ceramic coat and looking for more affordable options. I have definitely done my research and know that what I would not be able to do is the paint correction and polish. I know a reputable local shop that's willing to do a detail a 1 step paint correction (which is likely all I need) for about 300- 400 bucks. Has anyone ever had a professional prep the car, then do the ceramic coat yourself? What was your experience like
 
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Ceramic coating it yourself with something like cquartz uk 3 is a fairly easy process if you take out the entire paint correction process. I've done them myself several times with my own correction and paid someone to do the Tesla but honestly I can't see the different from a professional coating like ceramic pro vs the cquartz applications I've done myself. Also those '5 year' coatings they make you pay for annual visits so they can just spray coat it and your warranty is only good for those 5 years if you go in each time. For $150/yr for a spray ceramic boost you might as well just save the $ and get another coating in a few years lol. In the future I'd prob go the route you did if I wasn't going to do the paint correction myself.
 
Do yourself a favor and use a real ceramic coating like cquartz not the sprays that everyone is mentioning as 'ceramic coating' if you spend the money getting correction done. Use the sprays as a monthly/bi-monthly topper.

I do agree with this. While the spray coatings are a nice "topper," the real ceramic coatings is where it's at. My goal is to keep my maintence easier and conserve water with my ONR washes in my garage. Plus that extra shine is nice as well. I'm contemplating just buying a buffer/pad and doing the paint correction myself on my wife's car first for practice then doing like. I'm comfortable with the clay/iron remover already. I get the time commitment but a hobby I'd like to pick up.
 
I used these products on my black Model 3:

Exterior DIY Ceramic:
Gyeon Q2M Prep (from Esoteric Car Care, quick surface clean. No clay required for new car.)
Torque Detail Ceramic (Spray on ceramic, pad, and microfiber buff. No hard labor. Very easy to work with... not unpleasant at all, but best to wear a mask.)

Results: 6,000 miles, 9 months in Florida heat, garaged when not driving.
Just wipe down with microfiber cloth after rain. Car looks new.
Handwash with light automotive soap... very rarely.

I might do a second application soon, before it gets hot out this Summer.

INTERIOR: White Seats
Gyeon Q2M Leather Cleaner Mild (also from Esoteric Car Care)
Gyeon Q2 Leather Shield Interior Ceramic. (Soft. Easy. You don’t even feel it, but it protects very well.)

Good Luck!
 
You may want to consider a graphene coating after paint correction. They're considerably easier to apply and require no curing. They're the latest rage:


[Sorry: this Pan guy is a bit of a dork but very smart about detailing]
I've heard great things about the 303 graphene coating on several detailers videos for its chemical resistance and stuff. Price is pretty affordable too. I def want to try it out but I already have so many products to burn through currently so that will have to wait til these others are gone.
 
I used these products on my black Model 3:

Exterior DIY Ceramic:
Gyeon Q2M Prep (from Esoteric Car Care, quick surface clean. No clay required for new car.)
Torque Detail Ceramic (Spray on ceramic, pad, and microfiber buff. No hard labor. Very easy to work with... not unpleasant at all, but best to wear a mask.)

Results: 6,000 miles, 9 months in Florida heat, garaged when not driving.
Just wipe down with microfiber cloth after rain. Car looks new.
Handwash with light automotive soap... very rarely.

I might do a second application soon, before it gets hot out this Summer.

INTERIOR: White Seats
Gyeon Q2M Leather Cleaner Mild (also from Esoteric Car Care)
Gyeon Q2 Leather Shield Interior Ceramic. (Soft. Easy. You don’t even feel it, but it protects very well.)

Good Luck!

* Note: I used the exterior products outlined above on the glass too. Of course, there are coatings specIfically for glass but I didn’t want to purchase additional products and had good results.

They say the coating life is dependent upon use and environmental conditions. I’m happy with once a year, easy application. Defiantly enough for two applications of the products on a Model 3.

The mask comment is to avoid ceramic coating your lungs. Like I said, it’s not really caustic or anything, just a good safety precaution that I saw full-time detailers using.
 
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I did my car with CQuartz3.0 UK just over a year ago. The paint was already in very good condition with no swirls (PO must have taken care of it) so I just did a clay treatment, IPA wipedown, then two coats of ceramic.

It was still a lengthy process, but the car looks great a year later. I haven't applied Reload or another topper. Maybe one day. I clean the car with Wash Wax All.

I did not coat my wheels but don't regret it. They are still very easy to clean. I clean them about every 3 times I clean the paint.

If doing it again, I'd look into graphene. CQuartz was not difficult but it was somewhat nerve wracking in its curing/wiping process. I felt like I was pretty fastidious about wiping everything off and not leaving high spots, but there are still a couple of places that I missed. I never notice them, but it would be nice if the product were easier to apply and more forgiving.
 

Doanster1

Active Member
Feb 14, 2018
1,169
617
Oregon
why ? is it bad using a brush? i thought if you use 2 bucket method it is safe? whats a better way?
A proper mitt? Looks like you used one dip of the brush into the soap and cleaned the entire hood with varying motions. A mitt you could actually turn over and have a fresh side to work with before washing it off.
No biggie either way. Everyone has their own routine.
 

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