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DIY Dual Charger?

Keion

New Member
Oct 19, 2015
2
0
Norway
Hi guys, new to this forum, but have been following you for a while now.

I have a question, let's assume you're able to get your hand on a internal battery charger-unit from a wrecked Tesla. Would you be able to install it yourself? I assume that wiring etc. is in place or fairly easy to get your hands on. Can I expect there to be some programming/enabling involved to activate the second charger? From what I understand the process of installation is fairly simple and shouldn't be uncomprehensable.

I imagine that Tesla wouldn't be interested in installing the charger for you if you provide it for youself (although I haven't checked, yet).

- Keion
 

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,028
1,025
Hi guys, new to this forum, but have been following you for a while now.

I have a question, let's assume you're able to get your hand on a internal battery charger-unit from a wrecked Tesla. Would you be able to install it yourself? I assume that wiring etc. is in place or fairly easy to get your hands on. Can I expect there to be some programming/enabling involved to activate the second charger? From what I understand the process of installation is fairly simple and shouldn't be uncomprehensable.

I imagine that Tesla wouldn't be interested in installing the charger for you if you provide it for youself (although I haven't checked, yet).

- Keion

The short answer is no, you cannot, because the car has to be told that dual chargers are installed, and the chargers must be synced up to each other.

The service center may agree to program the charger for you on a labor basis, but experience has shown that they generally will not.
 
Once again, Tesla is extremely hostile to DIY. Don't count on being able to do anything like this, this is the one thing that nearly made me avoid buying a Tesla, and if Tesla had ANY competition I would certainly have gone for the competition instead due to this issue.

I suspect in a few years Tesla will be forced to play nice here, but so far you're pretty much SOL
 

AWDtsla

Active Member
Mar 3, 2013
4,284
4,257
NE
Tesla will have to release their mechanics software tools at some point, technically without doing so they are in violation of the law Motor Vehicle Owners' Right to Repair Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

- - - Updated - - -

I suspect a lot of what used to be DIY territory for car buffs or service manual material, now requires software to go along with the change you made by yourself. If you're a true DIY'er, this will also mean you're a programmer and can modify Tesla software.

- K

You can't be saying that the mechanics working in Tesla service centers are "programmers". They are not.
 

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,028
1,025
Tesla will have to release their mechanics software tools at some point, technically without doing so they are in violation of the law Motor Vehicle Owners' Right to Repair Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is incorrect.

TECHNICALLY, Tesla is not affected by the Massachusetts law, because the law applies to "dealers" and the term "dealer" is specifically defined in the law. See:
My P85 Salvage Story - Help! - Page 2

There is one part of a newer provision left unqualified by the "dealer" requirement that diagnostic information be accessible in standards-based format or wholly self-contained in the car, but it's unclear what that will mean. It's due in 2018, see that thread above.

Now, you can argue whether they fall afoul of the SPIRIT of the law - I agree they probably do - but I don't believe that Massachusetts has considered the implications of "right to repair" for a new breed of automobiles, either -- it contemplates your basic, run-of-the-mill metal box with the 4, 6, or 8-pack of miniature explosion containers up front connected to a spinning thing that turns wheels, which a lot of shops know how to fix. It would be the equivalent of requiring that a rail-gun manufacturer give open access to diagnostic and service information to any random gunsmith, because both weapons shoot at things.

Discussion on this topic belongs here:
Service Manual Subscriptions
 
Last edited:

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,028
1,025
It is abundantly clear that Tesla's lawyers disagree with you on this one. Nobody has ever come up with any other explanation as to why Tesla would make their service manuals available in MA but nowhere else.

Just because they make it available doesn't mean they disagree with me. They may be offering it to comply with the spirit in an attempt to prevent the legislature from going to the extreme and requiring more information than they would like to offer later, or perhaps give them another weapon after the court case loss.

The law is clear, plain, and simple - there are no complexities in it. The terms are clearly defined in the law, read it for yourself. Tesla doesn't have any of those.
 
It still baffles me as to why Tesla doesn't offer service manuals like every other manufacturer. Only offering it to folks in one state doesn't count.

Two reasons:

1. 400 VDC is really really nasty (even worse than AC). In most jurisdictions you need to be a certified electrician to work on those voltages. Having people killed when doing DIY services is really bad publicity.

2. The cars are so computerized and modular that it's becoming a bit like working on a new TV. Maybe there are a few things that a DIY person could do, but not a whole lot I suspect.
 

jaguar36

Active Member
Apr 10, 2014
2,148
1,961
NJ
Two reasons:

1. 400 VDC is really really nasty (even worse than AC). In most jurisdictions you need to be a certified electrician to work on those voltages. Having people killed when doing DIY services is really bad publicity.

2. The cars are so computerized and modular that it's becoming a bit like working on a new TV. Maybe there are a few things that a DIY person could do, but not a whole lot I suspect.

As far as I know there is no law on the books that prevents someone from playing with 400V DC in any jurisdiction.

There is a significant amount of computerization in the Tesla, that is true. There is also a ton of mechanical components as well. Anything from the brakes, to the cooling, to the AC, to the windows and doors could easily be handled by a competent mechanic/DIYer. The only restriction is availability of parts from Tesla.
 
Two reasons:


1. 400 VDC is really really nasty (even worse than AC). In most jurisdictions you need to be a certified electrician to work on those voltages. Having people killed when doing DIY services is really bad publicity.


2. The cars are so computerized and modular that it's becoming a bit like working on a new TV. Maybe there are a few things that a DIY person could do, but not a whole lot I suspect.

RE #1 - easy. Pull the contactor fuse on the HV pack. Done, 400 V completely isolated and the vehicle is safe to work on.

They do offer service manuals now, they are published online.

only if you live in MA.
 

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