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DIY install of Tesla WC in Ontario, any unique/unexpected provisions under Ontario Electrical Code?

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My plan is to DIY install a Tesla Wall Connector AND apply for the 50% Ontario rebate.

The rebate is worded such that an Ontario Electrical Safety Authority (ESA) inspection(s) seems to be required (of which I can get a 50% rebate on as well).

I plan on a 60 amp circuit breaker, 6 gauge wire and full conduit.

My circuit breaker panel is a 200 amp service located in my 3 bay garage, such that the panel's location is where the "passenger side rear fender" of my future Model 3 is.

Thus, I could mount the WC within 12 inches of the panel.....but I would always have to run the WC cord along the rear end of the car to connect into the drivers side rear fender location.

My other option is to run my circuit a total of 23 feet, from the panel along the side, top and other side of the garage door.

The only "issue" is that this location (which would be perfect for being close to the rear left fender of the car) is only 18 inches wide between the garage door rails (between the bay where my car will be parked and the next garage bay).

Ontario Electrical Code issues: do I need a separate 60 amp disconnect switch for this project, or is the circuit breaker itself considered adequate?

Is the 18 inch width between garage doors too narrow, thus forcing me to mount the WC right next to my circuit breaker panel?

Is 42 to 48 inches above the floor a correct (code wise) height for the WC?

Are there any other unique (for EV connectors) rules in the code?

Thanks
 
You need a disconnect within line of sight of the EVSE. In practice that means "right beside it".

Indeed. In my experience, inspectors will require a separate switch right beside the EVSE. I installed a couple at my former workplace (an electric utility) and connected them to 2 of our Smart Meters for monitoring purposes. The Smart Meters and disconnects were on the wall of the building, clearly in sight of the charging stations, but the inspector still insisted on nearby disconnect switches which I had mounted on the back sides of the pedestals.
 
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Indeed. In my experience, inspectors will require a separate switch right beside the EVSE. I installed a couple at my former workplace (an electric utility) and connected them to 2 of our Smart Meters for monitoring purposes. The Smart Meters and disconnects were on the wall of the building, clearly in sight of the charging stations, but the inspector still insisted on nearby disconnect switches which I had mounted on the back sides of the pedestals.
Thanks for the insight.
 
If you have a question contact the ESA. They will give you the answer. Obviously you need a permit.

Alternatively you could pay an electrician for advice, but I guess you don't want to do that. There are some half truths in the info given above.
 
If you have a question contact the ESA. They will give you the answer. Obviously you need a permit.

Alternatively you could pay an electrician for advice, but I guess you don't want to do that. There are some half truths in the info given above.
I bought the ESA permit today.

All in, $90.40. If the rebate system is still in place when I make my claim, I'll get 50% back.

The permit is good for one year.

With a permit/ID number (after payment) I was able to contact the local ESA inspector and ask all the code questions I wanted to.

My situation: no separate disconnect is required.

There will be one inspection, once I have my system all in and ready to go.

I'll hold off on ordering the Tesla EVSE itself until the start of Q2 as the rebate for the EVSE itself.
 
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Don't you need to have purchased an EV first to get the rebate? You also get 50% of the installation cost if you hire an electrician.

Rebate requirements
Individuals and organizations who have purchased an EV and received a rebate can apply for the charging station rebate. You can request one charging rebate for each vehicle rebate you received.

To receive a rebate, your charging station must:

  • be for residential or business vehicle use (not for public or customer use)
  • have a nominal voltage rating of 208-240 V (Level 2) only
  • be designed to charge one car at a time. Dual port charging stations are not eligible unless you have received two vehicles and two rebates
  • be on the list of eligible charging stations
  • have been purchased in Canada from a Canadian source (i.e. third-party certified or evaluated by cUL, CSA or cETL
Expenses eligible for a rebate include:

  • the purchase price of the charging station
  • the costs associated with installing the unit by a Licensed Electrical Contractor
  • the cost associated with an electrical inspection undertaken by ESA
 
Don't you need to have purchased an EV first to get the rebate? You also get 50% of the installation cost if you hire an electrician.
This is section E, eligibility, from the actual refund sheet:
rant.PNG


You are correct, one must have actual ownership of a new EV before proceeding to step E5.

The stipulation also states, "...and have received (past tense) an EV Incentive for this vehicle".

Anecdotally, I am told the provincial authority recognizes that the actual EV rebates are taking in excess of five months (in some instances) to be payed out. The provincial authority is being satisfied with the claim for an EV rebate to be successfully entered "into the system". I will contact the provincial authority when the time comes if that will be the case (i.e. once I take possession of the car and the car rebate is working thru the system, apply for the EVSE rebate ASAP).

You are also correct that if one hires an electrician, 50% of the installation cost is rebated (up to a $500.00 rebate)

In my case, I am doing the work myself.

50% of the ESA certificate is rebated in any case, so permit costs between a DIY and the pro are a wash.

The price for hardware for my installation (60 amp CB, conduit, wire, ancillaries, etc) comes to $272.00 all in. However, none of that is subject to rebate because I did not hire an electrician.

Therefore, if a pro were to quote me (2 x $272) $544.00 all in with taxes, fees and surcharges, it would be better to go with a pro.

The cheapest quote was north of $800.
 
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This is section E, eligibility, from the actual refund sheet:
View attachment 283327

You are correct, one must have actual ownership of a new EV before proceeding to step E5.

The stipulation also states, "...and have received (past tense) an EV Incentive for this vehicle".

Anecdotally, I am told the provincial authority recognizes that the actual EV rebates are taking in excess of five months (in some instances) to be payed out. The provincial authority is being satisfied with the claim for an EV rebate to be successfully entered "into the system". I will contact the provincial authority when the time comes if that will be the case (i.e. once I take possession of the car and the car rebate is working thru the system, apply for the EVSE rebate ASAP).

You are also correct that if one hires an electrician, 50% of the installation cost is rebated (up to a $500.00 rebate)

In my case, I am doing the work myself.

50% of the ESA certificate is rebated in any case, so permit costs between a DIY and the pro are a wash.

The price for hardware for my installation (60 amp CB, conduit, wire, ancillaries, etc) comes to $272.00 all in. However, none of that is subject to rebate because I did not hire an electrician.

Therefore, if a pro were to quote me (2 x $272) $544.00 all in with taxes, fees and surcharges, it would be better to go with a pro.

The cheapest quote was north of $800.

You missed the key point that rebate is only apply to the product on the eligible list (HPWC for Tesla), so 50% of the hardware will be 50% of the WC cost not including CB or wire....
 
You missed the key point that rebate is only apply to the product on the eligible list (HPWC for Tesla), so 50% of the hardware will be 50% of the WC cost not including CB or wire....
No, I didn't miss that point:

The price for hardware for my installation (60 amp CB, conduit, wire, ancillaries, etc) comes to $272.00 all in. However, none of that is subject to rebate because I did not hire an electrician.

I get 50% of my ESA inspection costs and 50% of my Tesla WC costs. That's it.