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Do I need to buy a Gen 2 NEMA 6-50 Adapter to charge @ 240v at home?

jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
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Maryland
For those that have already gotten delivery recently, do you need to buy the optional Gen 2 NEMA 6-50 Adapter to charge @ 240v at home?
I don't see the need for the wall charger.
If you want to be able to charge at 240V and 32 amps using the Tesla Gen2 Mobile Connector you would need to purchase either the NEMA 14-50 plug adapter or the 6-50 plug adapter for use with the Tesla Gen2 Mobile Connector. (The 14-50 plug adapter was originally included with the Tesla Model 3 etc. but this adapter is no longer included with the Tesla vehicle as part of the Gen Mobile Connector kit.) The kit now only comes with the NEMA 5-15 plug adapter.

The NEMA 14-50 plug/receptacle is far more common than the 6-50 plug/receptacle. The NEMA 14-50R (receptacle) is commonly used for home electric ovens, ranges and EV charging at home. The NEMA 14-50 receptacle is commonly found at RV parks for powering larger motor homes. The NEMA 14-50 receptacle requires three wires (plus ground.) The NEMA 6-50 receptacle only requires two wires (plug ground) as the neutral connection is not used in the 6-50 receptacle.

The wiring for the 6-50 receptacle would cost a bit less as there is one less conductor but the broader utility of the NEMA 14-50 receptacle makes this the better choice. If your garage already has a NEMA 6-50 receptacle (probably from prior use with an arc welder) then all you need to purchase is the NEMA 6-50 plug adapter. Also consider purchasing the Tesla Cable Organizer kit as this kit includes a mount for the Mobile Connector chassis and a hanger for the the charging cable. Don't let the Mobile Connector chassis hang supported only by the plug adapter.
 
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MorrisonHiker

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Mar 8, 2015
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You don't need the 6-50 adapter to charge at 240V. There are several 240V adapters available from Tesla: 6-15, 6-20, 6-50, 10-30, 14-30, 14-50.

As @jcanoe mentions, 14-50 would be the most common for charging a Tesla. If you have any of the other outlets available already, they could be used with the appropriate adapter to charge at 240V.
 
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jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
5,279
5,736
Maryland
Thank you for your input. Looks like a 14-50 would be the better choice.
I'm just trying to plan ahead - just ordered car yesterday with delivery estimate May 6 - June 2.
if you are planning to install the charging equipment in a garage the 14-50 receptacle would work. If you plan to install the charging equipment outside where it is exposed to the weather then you should reconsider, get the Wall Connector since it is designed for hard wired installation (no plug and receptacle used.) Once installed the Tesla Wall Connector is fully sealed, rated for use in all weather conditions. Even if you only end up installing the Wall Connector on a 40 amp or 50 amp circuit (60 amp is the maximum for the Wall Connector) a hard wired installation is far superior for an outdoor installation.
 
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jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
5,279
5,736
Maryland
I will be parking it outside, so must consider option suggested by jcanoe.
I don't feel like spending an extra $500 though.
One of my friends is an electrician, so he can advise me.
Depending on the length of the wire run installing the Wall Connector would save some money. The NEMA 14-50 receptacle requires 3 wires (plus ground wire). The Wall Connector only requires 2 wire (plus the ground wire). The cost per foot for the wire could be 25% less for the Wall Connector. Add to this savings that in many states, locations that have adopted the latest version of the National Electrical Code (NEC.) The NEC now specifies that the NEMA 14-50 receptacle requires a GFCI circuit breaker when used for EV charging. The 50 amp GFCI circuit breaker cost ~$100 (the cost of a standard double pole 50 amp circuit breaker is under $20.)

A third way that the Wall Connector could save you money is if you submit IRS form 8911 with your federal income tax return: About Form 8911, Alternative Fuel Vehicle Refueling Property Credit | Internal Revenue Service Consult your tax advisor.
 
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MorrisonHiker

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Mar 8, 2015
10,546
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Colorado
Depending on the length of the wire run installing the Wall Connector would save some money. The NEMA 14-50 receptacle requires 3 wires (plus ground wire). The Wall Connector only requires 2 wire (plus the ground wire). The cost per foot for the wire could be 25% less for the Wall Connector. Add to this savings that in many states, locations that have adopted the latest version of the National Electrical Code (NEC.) The NEC now specifies that the NEMA 14-50 receptacle requires a GFCI circuit breaker when used for EV charging. The 50 amp GFCI circuit breaker cost ~$100 (the cost of a standard double pole 50 amp circuit breaker is under $20.)

A third way that the Wall Connector could save you money is if you submit IRS form 8911 with your federal income tax return: About Form 8911, Alternative Fuel Vehicle Refueling Property Credit | Internal Revenue Service Consult your tax advisor.
You can actually claim any added electrical outlet (not just wiring for a wall connector) on your taxes if they are added for refueling your alternative fuel vehicle. We claimed that credit when we had our 14-50 outlets installed years ago. We claimed it again when we later put in the wall connectors.
 
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jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
5,279
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Maryland
You can actually claim any added electrical outlet (not just wiring for a wall connector) on your taxes if they are added for refueling your alternative fuel vehicle. We claimed that credit when we had our 14-50 outlets installed years ago. We claimed it again when we later put in the wall connectors.
I believe you have to claim the alternate fuel vehicle refueling property credit (that's a mouthful) in the same year that you install the circuit and/or charging equipment.
 

MorrisonHiker

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Mar 8, 2015
10,546
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I believe you have to claim the alternate fuel vehicle refueling property credit (that's a mouthful) in the same year that you install the circuit and/or charging equipment.
When we had the 14-50 outlets installed, we claimed them in that tax year. When we had the wall connectors installed several years later, the tax credit didn't exist. The tax credit was brought back and retroactively covered our installation date so we were able to claim it at a later date.
 
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Depending on the length of the wire run installing the Wall Connector would save some money. The NEMA 14-50 receptacle requires 3 wires (plus ground wire). The Wall Connector only requires 2 wire (plus the ground wire). The cost per foot for the wire could be 25% less for the Wall Connector. Add to this savings that in many states, locations that have adopted the latest version of the National Electrical Code (NEC.) The NEC now specifies that the NEMA 14-50 receptacle requires a GFCI circuit breaker when used for EV charging. The 50 amp GFCI circuit breaker cost ~$100 (the cost of a standard double pole 50 amp circuit breaker is under $20.)

A third way that the Wall Connector could save you money is if you submit IRS form 8911 with your federal income tax return: About Form 8911, Alternative Fuel Vehicle Refueling Property Credit | Internal Revenue Service Consult your tax advisor.
That's interesting you say that NEC now require 50A GFCI at the panel if installing a NEMA 14-50 for an EVSE use.
Because the Tesla Gen 3 Wall Connector manual (page 5) specifically say do NOT install a GFCI circuit breaker as it has one already built-in.

So you're saying Tesla is telling us to break the law? :p
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,279
5,736
Maryland
That's interesting you say that NEC now require 50A GFCI at the panel if installing a NEMA 14-50 for an EVSE use.
Because the Tesla Gen 3 Wall Connector manual (page 5) specifically say do NOT install a GFCI circuit breaker as it has one already built-in.

So you're saying Tesla is telling us to break the law? :p
The Tesla Wall Connector is designed to be hard wired into the circuit. When you hard wire the Wall Connector as per the installation guide there is no plug, i.e. NEMA 14-50 and no NEMA 14-50R (the receptacle) so there is no requirement for a separate GFCI for the circuit. (Although not a consideration for when there could be a NEMA 14-50 plug and NEMA 14-50R (receptacle) the Wall Connector has a GFCI built in.) The addition of a GFCI at the service panel is to protect the user when plugging and unplugging electric vehicle charging equipment (such as the Tesla Mobile Connector.) If the NEC now recognizes that plugging and unplugging an EVSE from a NEMA 14-50 receptacle is a potential risk to the user then why does the NEC not also require a GFCI on a 50A circuit with a NEMA 14-50 receptacle used for powering a motor home. (The NEMA 14-50 receptacle is becoming increasingly common at campgrounds and RV parks for powering larger motorhomes.) :rolleyes: (The other home location where you may encounter a NEMA 14-50 receptacle is in a kitchen for powering an electric wall oven or an electric range. Those kitchen appliances are rarely unplugged once they are put into service.)

If you have a NEMA 14-50 receptacle installed for charging an EV and don't have a GCFI circuit breaker you can still safely plug and unplug the NEMA 14-50 plug by first turning off the power at the panel. ;)
 
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jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
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Maryland
There's nothing stopping you from installing a NEMA 14-50P (plug) into the Wall Connector. Instead of hardwring. I don't believe this is disallowed?
You can do this but it will cost you more money. You will need to buy (assuming a 50A circuit) 6/3 conductor wire while 6/2 wire is all you need to hard wire install the Wall Connector. Then you would need to purchase a quality NEMA 14-50 receptacle (Hubbell, Bryant or Cooper), not Leviton. You will also need to buy a NEMA 14-50 plug and wire the plug or buy a 14-50 plug and wire kit (sold for making oven repairs.)

Depending on your local code you would need to install the 50A GFCI circuit breaker (about $100.) You will be limited to a 50A circuit if you use the NEMA 14-50 plug and receptacle. If you want to install a 60A circuit you cannot use the NEMA 14-50 plug and receptacle as these are only rated for a maximum of 50A.
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
7,821
9,838
Boise, ID
There's nothing stopping you from installing a NEMA 14-50P (plug) into the Wall Connector. Instead of hardwring. I don't believe this is disallowed?
Yes it is disallowed. NEC has kind of a catch-all rule that says that appliances must be installed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The wall connector instructions say it is to be hard wired. QED.
 
Yes it is disallowed. NEC has kind of a catch-all rule that says that appliances must be installed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The wall connector instructions say it is to be hard wired. QED.
I think that's correct, on the other hand Tesla themselves sold the wall connectors for a while with a 14-50 pigtail. Not much consistency by Tesla here :)
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
7,821
9,838
Boise, ID
I think that's correct, on the other hand Tesla themselves sold the wall connectors for a while with a 14-50 pigtail. Not much consistency by Tesla here :)
Tesla can sell something with a type of cord that THEY have selected as being an appropriate type for that device and tested to work well with it. That includes proper gauge, appropriate thickness of the strands in the wire, appropriate insulation type and thickness, etc. etc. People who may be buying external cords and not following the instructions may be getting various unknown things. Are they getting copper or aluminum? Many appliance cords people may buy use fine stranded wire. That frequently does not clamp well in a lot of types of electrical lugs without ferrules, which people may not have used if they are not following the instructions.
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,279
5,736
Maryland
Can anyone advise me where to purchase outdoor socket kit for 5-60? The ones I saw are all in Canada, like this one here: socket kit. Thanks!
The 6-50 is not as common in the US as the 14-50. Why not install the 14-50 as there are multiple outdoor enclosures with weather covers for the 14-50? For an outdoor installation I would advise installing the Tesla Wall Connector instead of installing either the 6-50 or 14-50. The Wall Connector only requires 2 conductors plus the ground (like the 6-50) but you don't need the weather enclosure. If you install a 14-50 or 6-50 receptacle for charging an EV you will need a 50A GFCI circuit breaker (costs ~$100 US). By the time you are done adding up the cost of installing a 14-50 with weather enclosure, GFCI, 3 conductor wire (plus ground), Cable Organizer for use with Gen2 Mobile Connector ($35), for $150 more you can have the Tesla Wall Connector ($500 US). The Wall Connector has a NEMA weather rating of 4 (can be sprayed with water from a garden hose) and be fine. If you have the capacity for a 60A circuit the Wall Connector will charge at 48A instead of a maximum of 32A for the Tesla Gen 2 Mobile Connector for 30% faster charging than the Mobile Connector.
 
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