TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker and becoming a Supporting Member. For more info: Support TMC

Does anyone charge from a regular wall outlet?

Discussion in 'Model 3: Battery & Charging' started by Finley&OtisDad, Jun 6, 2018.

  1. Finley&OtisDad

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2018
    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    Chicago
    I just made a reservation for a Model 3. Currently my garage has a regular GFCI outlet I think it's 110 volts- I don't have a huge commute max 40 miles a day, round-tip. I was thinking I could slow charge while at home and destination charge on the weekends. Anyone have an opinion on the feasibility of this from experience?
     
  2. SSonnentag

    SSonnentag Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2017
    Messages:
    616
    Location:
    Peeples Valley, Arizona
    I did once. Figure on 1.1 to 1.2 kWh per hour. Forty miles should take about 9 hours to recover.
     
  3. MrRandyB

    MrRandyB Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2016
    Messages:
    224
    Location:
    Delaware
    I did this for the first 2 weeks of owning the car.

    Mine charged right around 5 miles of range per hour. So you can charge like 6pm - 6am and regain 60 miles or basically the days usage overnight. It is just when other things come up that you wish you could charge faster.

    Such as giving multiple tours and test drives and 0-60 runs. A 0-60 run can sometimes eat up 4 miles of range, this can all eat up range rather quickly and takes a long time to get back.

    It is not ideal but it can work if you want it to.
     
    • Like x 1
  4. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,302
    Location:
    NE Tennessee
    I have done this at the in laws and with our Volt and it can work. Definitely a low cost way to start.
     
  5. jschwefel

    jschwefel VIN #1249, aka “Frank”

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2016
    Messages:
    193
    Location:
    Indy
    I’ve had the Model 3 for just over three months, and I charge on a normal 110v / 15 amp outlet. It charges at 5 miles per hour and works great, but the car is driven only about 15-20 miles per day. It seems vampire losses on the 3 are a lot lower than on my 2012 Model S. I might lose a couple miles a day; it’s so low I hardly notice it. I did have to replace the GFI outlet in the circuit. It was old and would trip regularly when I first started using it. No issues since I replaced it though.
     
    • Like x 1
  6. TexasEV

    TexasEV Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    6,856
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Feasible? Yes. A good idea? No. You’ll soon tire of this routine. One of the joys of owning a Tesla is waking up to a full charge each morning and never having to think about how much charge you have. In the long run you will be much happier if you have a 240V outlet installed In your garage. Just consider it part of the price of the car.
     
    • Like x 3
  7. Krash

    Krash Data Technician

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1,030
    Location:
    Intermountain US
    But in the mean time, if you have an older home with heavier gauge wiring it would definitely be worth upgrading to a 20A outlet (and 20A mobile plug adapter) if the circuit qualifies.
     
  8. ewoodrick

    ewoodrick Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2018
    Messages:
    1,080
    Location:
    Buford, GA
    I'm pretty sure that it was determined that the poster would indeed be fully charged every day.
    I don't plug either my Leaf or Model 3 in every day, they just don't need it.
     
    • Like x 1
  9. TexasEV

    TexasEV Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    6,856
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    How was this determined? By assuming he would charge every weekend at some unspecified destination charging station, as he plans? That would get really old after a while.

    By the way, Tesla strongly recommends plugging in every day if you can, even if you “don’t need it”. It’s in BOLD AND UPPER CASE LIKE THIS in the owners manual, as it was for the Model S.

    A connected Model S is a happy Model S
     
    • Like x 1
  10. ewoodrick

    ewoodrick Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2018
    Messages:
    1,080
    Location:
    Buford, GA
    Try reading every post from the start of the thread to yours. Others are saying, been there done that. He's planning on charging EVERY night on 110V and IF AND ONLY IF he goes further on the weekends, can use destination or fast chargers to supplement. This can save well over $500 in costs that may not ever be needed.
    So why would it not be a good thing? Heck, it's a lot better than some of the CA folks that seem to never charge at home and keep their Superchargers busy.

    And it may not be the best recommendation for the Tesla, but for someone who had one of the terrible non-conditioned Leaf batteries that after 3.5 years was at 96% capacity, I know I'm not the worse to make recommendations.
     
  11. jasonh4451

    jasonh4451 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2017
    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I have only had the car for a week but my plan is working so far. I charge on a 110V at home but I have a short daily commute and can Level 2 charge for free at my gym (3-4 visits per week). 5 miles per hour overnight covers my normal driving. I can also pay to charge at my office parking garage if in a pinch. ($2.00/hr for Level 2). Nearest Supercharger is 15 miles away if going on a road trip.

    Works for me so far. House is getting remodeled next spring though and I'll add a 14-50 for sure at that time.
     
    • Like x 3
  12. TexasEV

    TexasEV Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    6,856
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    The OP is in Chicago. I’m not sure your experience is relevant. Not too many below freezing nights in Georgia. .
     
  13. CricTic

    CricTic Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2014
    Messages:
    88
    Location:
    United States
    The Model 3 charges faster from 110 than any other Tesla, so it's certainly MORE doable than other Tesla owners have experienced in the past. But if it's feasible (both technically and financially), I'd consider installing a dedicated circuit just for the added freedom and peace of mind of never having to worry where your next charge is coming from.
     
  14. ferdboyce

    ferdboyce Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2013
    Messages:
    75
    Location:
    Seattle WA
    I installed a 20A 110V (5-20) outlet in my space in the parking garage in our condo in Seattle 4 ½ years ago, and have been using it ever since. We're on our second MS now, an 85D - since Nov 16 - and have had no problems. I drive (exclusive of road trips) about 7K miles/year, and I have a "full tank" virtually every morning (80% = 210 miles). I plug in faithfully every day, and In 2 ½ years, I still charge to 96+% when needed for a trip.
     
    • Informative x 2
    • Like x 1
  15. jamnmon66

    jamnmon66 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2018
    Messages:
    373
    Location:
    Brighton, CO
    I pony'd up for a Tesla charger and I'm glad I did. It's probably overkill most of the time but occasionally I've driven a lot and it's nice to be able to charge at 12 kw.

    I'm not an expert on it but I've read a few times in other threads that 240v is a lot more efficient than 120v regardless of amperage. Not sure if the difference would ever pay for a new circuit. And, also that medium charging speeds are healthier for the battery... but, just what I've read in here.
     
  16. timk225

    timk225 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2016
    Messages:
    1,197
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    I have charged my 3 from a 5-15 (standard 120 volt outlet) near my parking space just to try it on days when I didn't feel like getting out the 15 foot extension cord and getting down on the floor to unplug the oven. It works, but only 5 mph.

    The intermediate solution is to install a 6-20 outlet. 240 volt 20 amp. It can use the same standard yellow 12-2 Romex wire, instead of the much more expensive 6 gauge 4 strand wire to hook up a 14-50. I just have to install a double pole 20 amp breaker in my breaker box, and that should be good for around 15 mph. Tesla sells a 6-20 adapter.
     
    • Like x 3
  17. evJOULE

    evJOULE Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2018
    Messages:
    106
    Location:
    Canada
    I will have to use a 110V plug until the wall charger is installed, but like @jamnmon66 said, it might be overkill most of the time, but my feeling is that it will help smooth out my transition to going with an EV as life happens. Being able to regenerate range in shorter periods of time is a good thing.
     
  18. SSedan

    SSedan Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2017
    Messages:
    742
    Location:
    Greenville Wisconsin
    I have a MS in Wisconsin. I used a 15amp 110 for a few weeks in summer, come winter no way now how would that work. With the car drawing 24amps at 240volts from the wall a morning battery warmup can still drain a few miles even plugged in.

    The reason more power is more efficient so long as the battery doesn't need cooling is the electronic overhead, on the MS it is quoted as 400watts for the chargers and computer as a steady load regardless of how fast you try to charge. Battery warming can take a lot of power for those of us in cold places.

    My used car came with the 30amp 240volt adapter which is common for clothes dryers, it works well at 24amp but I plan to go bigger before winter with the hope of improving battery warming/charging efficiency. Below freezing or especially single digit or below zero temps really change things for EV power use and many coastal and southern owners are too quick to dismiss this.
     
    • Informative x 1
  19. CWFLY

    CWFLY Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2018
    Messages:
    46
    Location:
    San Diego
    Check your electricity bill. Pay attention to plans with Tiers, Baselines, and TOU (Time of use).

    The problem with 120V is that your longer charging time makes it harder to avoid the "peak" rates.

    Peak rates can be 3X more expensive than Off-Peak rates.
     
    • Informative x 3
    • Like x 2
  20. jamnmon66

    jamnmon66 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2018
    Messages:
    373
    Location:
    Brighton, CO
    Yep. My off peak rate is 6 cents and peak is 16. If I charge off peak, it would theoretically cost $4.50 to charge from 0-100% but $12.00 on peak. This of course doesn't take inefficiencies into account.
     

Share This Page

  • About Us

    Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.
  • Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


    SUPPORT TMC