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Yea that's about right. On google maps rt now (with traffic on my end) it spits out 500 miles even, 7hrs 25min. Limit is 70, I go about 75, make up some time there. Stop for 15 in the middle. Typically arrive in 7 and a half hours. My EPA MPG is 17/23.

So if you get a new model S with a 373 mile range, you will only have to stop once after @ 300 miles to eat. You will have @73 miles left and if you have a more "relaxed" meal - say 30 minutes instead of 15 - you will probably have added at least 200 miles to your range - more than enough to get to your destination. Your fuel costs will be zero and you will arrive far more relaxed because the car will have basically driven you the whole way.
 

Barklikeadog

Active Member
Jul 13, 2016
2,035
2,087
PA
So if you get a new model S with a 373 mile range, you will only have to stop once after @ 300 miles to eat. You will have @73 miles left and if you have a more "relaxed" meal - say 30 minutes instead of 15 - you will probably have added at least 200 miles to your range - more than enough to get to your destination. Your fuel costs will be zero and you will arrive far more relaxed because the car will have basically driven you the whole way.

if I go to evtripplanner my route comes out to 9:48 with 2stops.
523 miles (vs 500) it looks like I'm getting off the highway and driving to get to these chargers.
8hrs drive time, 1:48 charge time.
I chose the Model S long range, starting with a 100% charge.

If I sort my trip by 'supercharger route' it spits out a 551 mile trip.

pardon my skepticism

on another note, why do you guys focus so much on saving 50 or 100 bucks on gas? This is a 90 thousand dollar sedan. Who buys a 90k sedan so they don't have to buy gas anymore? Buy a 25k Corolla if money is a factor.
 

eevee-fan

Active Member
Dec 2, 2019
2,283
3,043
Nevada
I dunno about anyone else, but I applaud your efficiency especially with kids. That's some expert level itinerary.

My itinerary is more like this

9am - Why isn't she ready?
9:30am - Why are you still not ready?
10:00 - hit the road finally
10:05 - "Can you stop off at Starbucks?"
10:15 - Hit the road again
10:30 - "I need to pee because I drank too much coffee"
10:30 -> 1pm dealing with crazy PNW traffic
1:00pm -> stop to eat/pee/etc/charge
1:15pm -> Car says its almost done charging, and we still haven't gotten our food.
1:30pm -> Car is done charging so I have to move the slider from 90% to 100% to buy time. Sorry other Tesla owners
1:35pm -> Can I have the check?
1:40pm -> I'd really like the check now
1:45pm -> Finally
1:50pm -> Back on the road
4ish to 5ish -> Getting tired of driving, and my eyes are bugging out
5pm (or so) -> Stop to charge to stretch my legs, and maybe grab a bite to eat.
5:30pm -> Back on road, and now my eyes work correctly.
7pm -> Arrive at destination successfully without any serious issues.

Haha, and people complain about EVs taking too long to charge. Not the case when you are the only one driving. The charge/rest break is welcomed.
 
Late arrival to this thread. Pull up a chair and I'll tell you my story why.

As a car enthusiast of 37 of my 40 years, ICE cars will never fully leave my heart, much like a first love.

I am not a tech guy. I don't work in IT. I work in the car business. My first car was a Camaro Z28. Me and my dad put a Vortech supercharger on it. We went to drag strips and autocrosses and our local road course. I was a punk teenager who liked to smoke weed and blast rap music, but me and my dad ALWAYS bonded over cars. That scene kept me involved with him and I had a blast constantly tweaking that car, trying out new parts, trying to make it faster, handle better, sound better, look better. It was just so much fun.

Fast forward 20 years. After starting a family of my own and helping build my career, I got a point where I was able to have two of my own fun vehicles. I had a 2016 Mazda 3i hatch as a daily commuter, and a 2004 Mazdaspeed Miata as a fun weekend toy. Neither vehicle really scratched my itch for having something fun AND comfortable every day. I went and test drove a few fun cars - new Camaro SS, new Mustang GT, new Charger Scat Pack. Even a new Genesis G70 3.3TT.

All of them were bananas to drive and put a huge smile on my face.

On a whim, I decided to check out the Tesla sales center and requested a test drive with a P3D+. They let me have one for a 24 hour test drive.

And NOTHING could prepare me for what happened when I mashed that accelerator pedal. You all know what happened next, because you all probably had a similar experience!

It's truly a perfect commuter. It can blast past almost anything up to 80 mph. It costs me next to nothing to charge at home. It's quiet and smooth. Sound system is excellent. It was super fun to take to the local drag strip last summer.

So what's it missing? Save for the software updates and dropping weight, I can't really mod it to go faster! I miss that tweaking and modding. That was so much fun to do. And for as wonderful as a silent powertrain is on a commuter vehicle, I do miss having a snarling engine to sound nasty when needed. And the acceleration above 50 mph... I wish it didn't quite run out of legs above 80 mph. I've had a fairly stock Mustang GT start reeling me in from a roll, and that was kind of a bummer.

I hope at some point to pick up a Porsche 991.2 or a 992. That's a bucket list car for me - there's no amount of pointing out EV advantages that can talk me out of it. They're nearly as quick as a P3D. I can tweak it. Legendary marque. I just really want one, no further explanation needed.

But until I get one... this P3D will certainly scratch a LOT of the performance itch!
 
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gavine

Petrol Head turned EV Enthusiast
Apr 1, 2014
2,637
2,218
Philadelphia, PA
I wish it didn't quite run out of legs above 80 mph. I've had a fairly stock Mustang GT start reeling me in from a roll, and that was kind of a bummer.

Do you know what your state of charge was at the time? EVs, especially the performance variants rely on high states of charge for full power, even more-so at higher speeds.

Here's a video of a non-performance showing quarter mile times at different states of charge. Performance model would be affected even more -->

 
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Do you know what your state of charge was at the time? EVs, especially the performance variants rely on high states of charge for full power, even more-so at higher speeds.

Here's a video of a non-performance showing quarter mile times at different states of charge. Performance model would be affected even more -->


If I were to guess I was somewhere near 80%. That's another slight drawback - needing to be at very high SOC for Max performance. ICE cars are the opposite. They get faster with less fuel!
 
I hope at some point to pick up a Porsche 991.2 or a 992. That's a bucket list car for me - there's no amount of pointing out EV advantages that can talk me out of it. They're nearly as quick as a P3D. I can tweak it. Legendary marque. I just really want one, no further explanation needed.

But until I get one... this P3D will certainly scratch a LOT of the performance itch!

When you do get your bucket list car you'll realize stop light speed isn't everything. Porsche just handle and drive so much better...and the sounds they make. Music to my ears.
 

Uncle Paul

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2013
6,299
7,645
Canyon Lake,CA
The best and finest gassers do indeed provide a viseral experience lacking in an EV.

They make a soul stirring noise and the turn gasoline into forward thrust.

Problem is that currently our civilization does not put up with such foolishness.

If you drive with loud exhausts you will get a ticket. If you show a gasser expedition of speed, you will get a citation. If you drift around corners, you will have your car impounded.

Very few places you can currently drive such cars in a exuberant fashion.

At slower speeds, or in traffic congestion, they are out of their element. Harsh riding, noises, polluting, smelly and generally ill equiped to provide the type of urban transportation most of us use our cars to provide.

At reasonable speeds they don't excite. They are uber expensive to maintain and insure.

Urban use for these very expensive high performance cars is not their element.

Like the dinasaurs they are on the edge of extinction.

Many have been brainwashed to believe that noisy high performance cars are something that makes them look cool...that ship has sailed.
 
I dunno guys these dinosaur nICE cars did a fine job this morning. When they die I'm glad I have a Tesla as back up.

2019-03-31 14.11.19.jpg
2020-01-03 09.49.10.jpg
Screen Shot 2019-03-25 at 3.20.01 PM.png
 
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Uncle Paul

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2013
6,299
7,645
Canyon Lake,CA
Magnificant picture of those two Porsche.

Interesting thing is that so many people will still cling to the legacy of those cars, but still fail to realize that the latest versions do not offer the same connected experiences.
Manual transmissions are barely available. Computer controlled shifting is the way to make them faster still. They no longer have the wonderful sounds of the early air cooled legends. Now they are liquid cooled and mostly what you hear standing next to them are the LOUD and bad sounding fans.
The previous peaky powerbands have been smoothed out with multiple small turbos offering consistant thrust.
Screeching around corners is no longer possible, due to mandatory stability controls. Same with fun burning rubber. Computers instantly quench most any tire spin.
Onboard computer will protect you from spinning out in a hot curve, but you are no longer in control. The thrill is diminished.
Top speed is determined by the computer, but not by the driver's courage.
Most stock exotics exhausts no longer sound all that good. Owners need to go to aftermarket to get a thrilling exhaust. Spend lots of $ and usually make the cars illegal to drive on the streets.

Newer exotics are becoming "Computers on Wheels' as well. Driver skills are not that necessary to obtain peak performance on the streets.
Most of the performance gains currently are achieved by putting wide, super expensive and sticky tires on their performance offerings. There is usually only offer a small window of a few laps before they get greasy and fading away. Many racers use specialized "qualifying tires" to get in just one hot lap to set a record or get on the pole.
 
There are things EVs do incredibly well, and there are areas where they fall short. It's OK to admit this to yourselves. The shortcomings will eventually get resolved. If those shortcomings don't affect your lifestyle today and you want an EV, great. If they do, get an ICE vehicle. Great. Isn't choice great?

"The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function."


Anyway, I'll agree that my Model 3 isn't a *proper* driver's car. The only way to really make it truly engaging is to drive it well into the "I'm going to jail for this" territory.

I don't know whether this is because 1) it's an EV, 2) it's not a sports car, 3) my commute is ridiculously short and I don't really get to stretch its legs, 4) it's a P3D- and still far too "tame," for me at least, in the way that it "feels." Hoping coilovers/wheels/tires will help this a bit.

I do miss the sound of an ICE engine, shifting gears, perfectly-executed heel/toe downshifts, and the overall feeling of a well-sorted, lightweight sports car. There's just no sense of "jinba ittai" with the Model 3, as Mazda would say. It's just so good at what it does - shuffling fleshy bags of organs from point A to B with absolute ease & comfort. There's little skill or engagement involved.
 

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