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Does chill mode improve range?

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
6,029
6,711
Maryland
Is there any noticeable difference in range with the Chill Mode?

Does Chill Mode make the acceleration curve more smooth or does it just reduce the horsepower?

Does Chill Mode also reduce the regenerative braking?

If you normally accelerate gently then Chill Mode will not make a difference. If you have a heavy foot on the accelerator then Chill Mode would use less power while accelerating. Once you are at speed there is no difference in consumption when using Chill Mode versus Standard Mode or Performance Mode. If you engage Tesla Autopilot or FSD when in Chill Mode the Tesla vehicle will accelerate more slowly, i.e. you won't be firmly pushed back into the seat while accelerating when either of these features are actived.

From what I have seen, read Chill Model reduces power at all accelerator pedal positions for approximately 50% reduction in HP and torque.

No, Chill Mode has no effect on regenerative braking.
 
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GeezerSquid

Still a Geezer & Still A Squid
Jun 17, 2020
289
386
Baton Rouge, LA
One other thing that chill mode does is reduce rear tire wear. I got the Acceleration Boost the same day it became available. I replaced the tires trying to improve ride quality. The new tires were 80,000 mile Bridgestone's. I, and my total lack of impulse control, wore the rears out in 7,000 miles. The cost of acting like a 15 year old at almost every opportunity finally caught up with me. It's now Chill almost 100% of the time.
 

DayTrippin

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 30, 2021
1,688
2,007
Park Cities, TX
Lesson learned here is to rotate your tires every 2k miles if you drive like @GeezerSquid . I found I can drive with enthusiasm as long as I am not going WFO right from the launch. Wait until about 15-20 mph and your tires with thank you.

All the instant torque just shreds the tires if you use it at launch. On a roll it takes less of a toll. So drive like a Geezer at first, then once rolling, hit it like a Squid. Your tires and pocketbook will thank me later.

As mentioned, Chill mode does nothing but make the car boring. Speed is your real enemy of range.
 

miracj

2021 Model Y LR AWD
Jul 15, 2021
98
83
Waltham, MA
Lesson learned here is to rotate your tires every 2k miles if you drive like @GeezerSquid . I found I can drive with enthusiasm as long as I am not going WFO right from the launch. Wait until about 15-20 mph and your tires with thank you.

All the instant torque just shreds the tires if you use it at launch. On a roll it takes less of a toll. So drive like a Geezer at first, then once rolling, hit it like a Squid. Your tires and pocketbook will thank me later.

As mentioned, Chill mode does nothing but make the car boring. Speed is your real enemy of range.
Even on boring chill mode, when I slammed the pedal to the metal after rolling a second or two, all of my passengers were still very much impressed. I keep it in chill mode to contain the tiger!

Any idea what the 0-60 mph time is in chill mode?
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
6,029
6,711
Maryland
When I had my Model Y for only a few weeks I was driving in Chill Mode at a traffic light, waiting to turn left and then continue for a short distance up a hill where the road merges down to one lane. I shut down a Gen2 Volt driver who thought he could out pace me in my Long Range Model Y. It was close but in the end the Volt petered out and the Model Y just kept accelerating. (To this day I bet the driver of the Volt thinks his ride is almost as fast a Tesla. If he only knew the Tesla was in Chill Mode. 😆)
 
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I find chill mode to help in the winter on snow. I wouldn't consider myself a lead foot but while in sport mode I was slipping more often than I'd like coming off a dead stop. Chill mode eliminated those slips and winter driving was a more pleasent experience.
This is great advice. I have been concerned about how the Tesla handles snow and icy roads. Fast acceleration is now a great idea. But I am more concerned that the inability to reduce the regenerative breaking will make skidding more likely when slowing down or stopping on icy roads. I wish Tesla has an option to reduce the strength of regenerative breaking under such conditions.
 
This is great advice. I have been concerned about how the Tesla handles snow and icy roads. Fast acceleration is now a great idea. But I am more concerned that the inability to reduce the regenerative breaking will make skidding more likely when slowing down or stopping on icy roads. I wish Tesla has an option to reduce the strength of regenerative breaking under such conditions.
Under driving you should have options for regen, Normal and Low. I use chill and low in the winter. I even made a winter profile so I don't have to remember to change everyone back and forth.
 
One other thing that chill mode does is reduce rear tire wear. I got the Acceleration Boost the same day it became available. I replaced the tires trying to improve ride quality. The new tires were 80,000 mile Bridgestone's. I, and my total lack of impulse control, wore the rears out in 7,000 miles. The cost of acting like a 15 year old at almost every opportunity finally caught up with me. It's now Chill almost 100% of the time.

Ahhh, but by using chill mode all the time rather than having fun (and rotating your tires every few thousand miles) means you wasted the money on AB! Any chance you can learn impulse control and go back to using sport mode? I hate to see AB going to waste :)

Also, some sticky tires with 40,000 mile life may actually last longer than tires with 80,000 mile life that don't grip as well since you would be reducing wheel spin.

Keith
 
Under driving you should have options for regen, Normal and Low. I use chill and low in the winter. I even made a winter profile so I don't have to remember to change everyone back and forth.

The OP doesn't state the year of his MY. If he has a 2020 then yes, he can adjust regen... sadly they removed this option for some reason in the 2021 cars.

Keith
 
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Yes. The low regen option is gone now. 🙁

With strong regen in winter, you need to be careful with the accelerator. When coming to a stop YOU are controlling the amount of regen by how much you lift off of the accelerator. Luckily in the MY your regen is distributed between both axles, so it is less likely to lock up any one tire or axle compared to a FWD or RWD EV. I don't know how the MY reacts to regen on ice, in the Bolt it is scary AF (it reduces regen to zero to unlock the wheels and the driver panics and hits the brake pedal)... In the Bolt we have four levels of regen (drive, low, drive with regen paddle, low with regen paddle), so I just set it on the weakest in winter.

Keith
 
What?! That's wild and a little sad. I had no idea. Thanks.

The surprising part to me is that they have not NERFED your regen selectivity via a software update. When it is all controlled by software, and they can change it any time they like why would they have different software on the 2020 than they do on the 2021? Are they running a "study" with the 2021 cars as the control group?

Keith
 

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