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Does performance feel safer?

Perhaps a dumb question, but let me explain. I also had old economy cars previously. I got the Model Y and was blown away by it's speed despite being the second slowest at that time behind the SR+ 3. I always thought having good acceleration was just a party trick and just for fun. While it kind of is, the more I drove, the more I have changed my mind. I genuinely feel safer in the Y since I feel like it gives me another option to avoid an accident or hazard. I'm was used to thinking slamming on the breaks as my sole option, whereas I truly feel accelerating out of danger is also an option on the Y. In my old CR-V for example it would legit be seconds from flooring it until any noticeable increase in speed.

Anyway, on to my actual questions. Has anyone noticed the same and if so, does this translate even more to performance models, or is at the point of diminishing returns and is basically just more fun and a better party trick. Not that there isn't anything wrong with it being such of course. I've found it REALLY fun.



Thanks!
 

Bigtuna00

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Jun 12, 2019
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I think you'd only run into diminishing returns if the car felt unsafe while accelerating. Think of a big block V8 50s-70s muscle car shredding tires and listing to the side. The Tesla's, even the fastest ones, have such good traction control and stability that they feel safe when accelerating.

I agree it's always nice to have the option and definitely allows me to drive with more confidence in terms of putting the car exactly where I want it. The funny thing is, with autopilot I drive MUCH slower now than at any other time in my life. It's also about having the confidence to know that my car is quicker than 99% of the cars on the road. But I'm sure it's also just that I'm getting older :)
 
I think you'd only run into diminishing returns if the car felt unsafe while accelerating. Think of a big block V8 50s-70s muscle car shredding tires and listing to the side. The Tesla's, even the fastest ones, have such good traction control and stability that they feel safe when accelerating.

I agree it's always nice to have the option and definitely allows me to drive with more confidence in terms of putting the car exactly where I want it. The funny thing is, with autopilot I drive MUCH slower now than at any other time in my life. It's also about having the confidence to know that my car is quicker than 99% of the cars on the road. But I'm sure it's also just that I'm getting older :)


Hehe, thanks for the input Bigtuna!
 
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Gasaraki

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Oct 21, 2019
2,338
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Perhaps a dumb question, but let me explain. I also had old economy cars previously. I got the Model Y and was blown away by it's speed despite being the second slowest at that time behind the SR+ 3. I always thought having good acceleration was just a party trick and just for fun. While it kind of is, the more I drove, the more I have changed my mind. I genuinely feel safer in the Y since I feel like it gives me another option to avoid an accident or hazard. I'm was used to thinking slamming on the breaks as my sole option, whereas I truly feel accelerating out of danger is also an option on the Y. In my old CR-V for example it would legit be seconds from flooring it until any noticeable increase in speed.

Anyway, on to my actual questions. Has anyone noticed the same and if so, does this translate even more to performance models, or is at the point of diminishing returns and is basically just more fun and a better party trick. Not that there isn't anything wrong with it being such of course. I've found it REALLY fun.



Thanks!

Yes, what most Americans don't get is that lightness and performance are a safety factor, not just big, boxy, heavy, airbags, fancy features, etc. European sedans used to subscribe to the idea that light, nimble, good performance makes a better vehicle. Being able to dodge or accelerate out of the way of danger is better than you hitting something and surviving.

However, the performance versions is not going to be safer than the non-performance versions. .5 sec faster 0-60 is not going to help in any scenario.
 
I think a lot of drivers instinctively hit the brakes, with the idea that it stops the situation, when really, it merely stops the car and can actually contribute to an incident. That said, you generally want to be able to react in any direction, and what electric offers is responsiveness. So if you need to remove yourself from a situation by moving forward, you have a better option.

In practice, I'd say the difference from the Performance would be negligible, at best, though. But there's no doubt, if you mean to cover distance for any reason, and your car is lagging behind your throttle (or steering) input, it's neither favorable or confidence-inspiring.
 

MODEL+

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Oct 21, 2020
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However, the performance versions is not going to be safer than the non-performance versions. .5 sec faster 0-60 is not going to help in any scenario.

What? 0.5 sec doesn't matter in 0-60? Is this why manufacturers spend countless hours in engineering to advertise 0.1-0.9 seconds of 0-60 improvements over their previous gen of cars?
 
What? 0.5 sec doesn't matter in 0-60? Is this why manufacturers spend countless hours in engineering to advertise 0.1-0.9 seconds of 0-60 improvements over their previous gen of cars?
He's right I picked up my M3P last Saturday the shorter 0-60 pull is way overkill for everyday driving. I have already scared the crap out of two kids and made my wife nauseous showing them the 0-60 pull and it was under 80 SOC like 76%. My wife drives a 21 Y LR and 0-60 is way different, she loves doing 0-60 pulls in her Y and wants the boost lol. The 3 Performance is a whole different beast it's rather violent from a dead stop the amount of force you take off with. If you've been to Disney World and rode Mission to Space Orange Version then it's kinda like that.
 
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Sam1

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Sep 11, 2019
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NV
The Tesla's, even the fastest ones, have such good traction control and stability that they feel safe when accelerating.

So good it's to the point where if your rear end starts breaking loose around a corner because of the transition between power to regen/braking, you can throttle up and let the computer take over and save you. Not that I have done that before, this is purely a hypothetical statement.:D
 
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What? 0.5 sec doesn't matter in 0-60? Is this why manufacturers spend countless hours in engineering to advertise 0.1-0.9 seconds of 0-60 improvements over their previous gen of cars?

In terms of being able to get out of a bad situation while the car is moving? I’d say no, it doesn’t matter that much.

What matters is the suddenness that you get from instant torque, which all Teslas have.

Improving 0-60 is great, but it’s primarily for bragging rights IMO. Shaving fractions of a second off that doesn’t help you when you’re going 50 and trying to get out of the blind spot of a merging 18 wheeler.
 

MODEL+

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Oct 21, 2020
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992
Portland, OR
.5 sec faster 0-60 is not going to help in any scenario.


He's right I picked up my M3P last Saturday the shorter 0-60 pull is way overkill for everyday driving. I have already scared the crap out of two kids and made my wife nauseous showing them the 0-60 pull and it was under 80 SOC like 76%. My wife drives a 21 Y LR and 0-60 is way different, she loves doing 0-60 pulls in her Y and wants the boost lol. The 3 Performance is a whole different beast it's rather violent from a dead stop the amount of force you take off with. If you've been to Disney World and rode Mission to Space Orange Version then it's kinda like that.

In terms of being able to get out of a bad situation while the car is moving? I’d say no, it doesn’t matter that much.

What matters is the suddenness that you get from instant torque, which all Teslas have.

Improving 0-60 is great, but it’s primarily for bragging rights IMO. Shaving fractions of a second off that doesn’t help you when you’re going 50 and trying to get out of the blind spot of a merging 18 wheeler.
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
4,224
3,922
Maine
Perhaps a dumb question, but let me explain. I also had old economy cars previously. I got the Model Y and was blown away by it's speed despite being the second slowest at that time behind the SR+ 3. I always thought having good acceleration was just a party trick and just for fun. While it kind of is, the more I drove, the more I have changed my mind. I genuinely feel safer in the Y since I feel like it gives me another option to avoid an accident or hazard. I'm was used to thinking slamming on the breaks as my sole option, whereas I truly feel accelerating out of danger is also an option on the Y. In my old CR-V for example it would legit be seconds from flooring it until any noticeable increase in speed.

Anyway, on to my actual questions. Has anyone noticed the same and if so, does this translate even more to performance models, or is at the point of diminishing returns and is basically just more fun and a better party trick. Not that there isn't anything wrong with it being such of course. I've found it REALLY fun.
Thanks!
I first felt that "active" safety was the first course of option, in my BMW. However, that has nothing on the Tesla, which is a whole order of magnitude quicker from thought to foot to motion.

Is a performance better for active safety? Probably not, as the differences become smaller and smaller, the bigger difference is your reaction time to any potential hazard.
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
4,224
3,922
Maine
Yes, what most Americans don't get is that lightness and performance are a safety factor, not just big, boxy, heavy, airbags, fancy features, etc. European sedans used to subscribe to the idea that light, nimble, good performance makes a better vehicle. Being able to dodge or accelerate out of the way of danger is better than you hitting something and surviving.

However, the performance versions is not going to be safer than the non-performance versions. .5 sec faster 0-60 is not going to help in any scenario.
You're describing the difference between "active" safety and "passive" safety. Active safety is great in the hands of a good driver, but even the best drivers run out of talent and have to rely upon passive safety.
 
You're describing the difference between "active" safety and "passive" safety. Active safety is great in the hands of a good driver, but even the best drivers run out of talent and have to rely upon passive safety.

I don't think that active safety is a substitute for passive safety. But most modern cars these days are quite safe. I'd rather have the smaller and more nimble one and have a chance at avoiding that accident rather than be in a huge box and have no chance but to take it.
 

holmgang

Active Member
Sep 9, 2019
1,389
1,532
eu
whereas I truly feel accelerating out of danger is also an option on the Y. In my old CR-V for example it would legit be seconds from flooring it until any noticeable increase in speed.
Thanks!

Since the Y is likely the fastest car you've ever driven in your life. How often have you previously been in a dangerous situation because you were unable to accelerate out of fit?
 
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Since the Y is likely the fastest car you've ever driven in your life. How often have you previously been in a dangerous situation because you were unable to accelerate out of fit?

honestly it’s pretty hard to say. I honestly can’t think of any situations off hand. I’ve only been in one accident ever, and there was no real avoiding it. Guy ran right into me at a light and only real place I could have gone was to the right, and there was a car there.
 
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