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Does red color car have higher insurance

Discussion in 'Model S' started by mrtian97, Mar 24, 2017.

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  1. mrtian97

    mrtian97 Member

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    I am leaning toward new S60 in red. Is it true that red car has higher premium than other color such as black or blue?
    I wouldn't think so but like to get your input
    Thanks
     
  2. Tech_Guy

    Tech_Guy Ludicrous + you say, well I got Ludicrous -

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    Not true...
    The insurance company never asks you what color your car is...
     
    • Like x 1
  3. Patrick W

    Patrick W Active Member

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    I was with Allstate (they don't seem to like Tesla and charge accordingly) and now with Progressive. In neither case was I asked about color.
     
  4. Haxster

    Haxster Member

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    While they may not ask, your VIN tells all.
     
  5. ahurst

    ahurst Member

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    No.

    Color of vehicle has no bearing on premiums....

    Although there is some research to suggest that beige/gold cars are harder to see in certain conditions...

    and drivers of white and silver colored cars are issued fewer moving violations (i.e. they make 10% of the car population but are issued only 5% of the tickets).
     
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  6. HankLloydRight

    HankLloydRight Fluxing

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    The red car thing is a myth: Do Red Cars Get More Speeding Tickets?

    Car color is not encoded in the VIN. Actually very little can be told from the VIN. Car style, motor size, battery size, model year, seat belt type, production location.
     
    • Informative x 2
    • Like x 1
  7. Akikiki

    Akikiki A'-Lo-HA ! y'all

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    Except color. Decode your VIN. There's no character position for color
     
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  8. mrtian97

    mrtian97 Member

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    thanks, this is helpful bc I like the red color, this will be my first red color car
     
    • Like x 1
  9. Akikiki

    Akikiki A'-Lo-HA ! y'all

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    Me too. I mean, I already have a MC Red P85 that I love the color. And I have a MC Red 90D on order. Stickin with the RED. The P85 is the first RED I've ever owned.
     
    • Love x 1
  10. Haxster

    Haxster Member

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    You are correct. My bad.

    Regarding red cars (one data point): For the last ~130K miles, I've driven my '87 red Corvette VERY fast ever since I bought it in 1986. Through care, radar, and (mostly) luck, I've never had a speeding ticket.

    BTW, anyone interested in buying it? It's for sale.
     
  11. brucet999

    brucet999 Active Member

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    If true, I suspect it has more to do with their bland personalities than anything else. My cop neighbor insists that red cars do not look faster to him or his colleagues. I did not ask him about whether flames painted on the sides would bring a driver under the microscope. :)
     
  12. Gouldness

    Gouldness Gould times ahead.

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    I was thinking this exact thing, just assumed it'd be more expensive. Thanks for asking this question.
     
  13. ThisIsTrue

    ThisIsTrue Dismember

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    No, but my (State Farm) agent told me that a P definitely costs more.
     
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  14. Sawyer8888

    Sawyer8888 Member

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    As you may already know, you do not have much time left to place your order for a new Model S 60.

    I prefer red as well. It is a unique vehicle. So, why not go with a color that contrasts against most of the other grey, black and white cars that are out there? Go with what you like because it will cost you no more for insurance or speeding tickets vs. other color options. With that said, the extra $1,500 for the multi-coat red cannot be avoided. Well worth it though.

    60 to Zero: Tesla Pulls the Plug on the Model S 60 (Again)
     
  15. brkaus

    brkaus Active Member

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    Definitely true. I was quoted $600 more per 6 months when they first matched my 100d to a p100d. No 100d in State Farm's database yet. They fixed it to a 90d with a comment added for the underwriting department.
     
    • Like x 1
  16. smartypnz

    smartypnz Supporting Member

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    The only time a red car's insurance is higher is if the driver thinks matching the traffic light's color means go.
     
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  17. ahurst

    ahurst Member

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    USAA has no P vs non-P distinction on their rates
     
  18. brkaus

    brkaus Active Member

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    Nice!!!!
     
  19. SomeJoe7777

    SomeJoe7777 Marginally-Known Member

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    No argument against @ahurst, but this type of phrasing brings up an interesting point about correlation vs. causation and an opportunity to examine those nuances. (Somewhat off-topic, I apologize, but very interesting).

    The statement above is a correlation, i.e. two different things (white/silver cars and low amounts of moving violations) tend to go together. But it doesn't at all state that one causes the other. Indeed, hypothesizing one item as the cause and the other as an effect is equally valid in both directions, as you can infer neither from only a correlation statement.

    1. I could speculate that white/silver cars get less moving violation because police don't ticket them as often due to the color.

    2. I could also speculate that safer drivers who get less moving violations tend to buy cars with more conservative colors, like white/silver.

    We have no evidence that either of these cause/effect relationships are true. Correlation never implies causation! You must have much more specific evidence to conclude that one item is a cause and the other is an effect.

    Other examples of where evidence of the correlation is high, but evidence for the cause/effect relationship is much harder to find:

    1. Job earnings vs. gender.
    2. Incarceration rate vs. race.

    There are a fair number of politicians, pundits, bloggers, and the like that frequently use correlations to try to prove a causation when in reality that is a logical fallacy. Especially in this day and age, I'm always on the lookout for it. :)
     
  20. Mr X

    Mr X Future Owner

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    Lol never heard of that. If anything you should get a discount for having an actual appeasing color to the eye and not a bland boring generic non exciting silver or grey or white or black (me excluded).
     

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