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Does Tesla Nav consider elevation change when computing charging stops?

I'm doing our first road trip that will need charging (LA to Vegas; actually the first time doing this trip by car!). ABRP considers elevation change when computing battery drain, but I'm wondering: if I point the Tesla Nav to Vegas, will it take into consideration energy drain from elevation change? Basically I want to be sure I don't pass a Supercharger thinking the car will make it over a portion with a big elevation change and get stranded... thanks!
 

MorrisonHiker

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Mar 8, 2015
10,579
10,635
Colorado
Yes, if you use the car's navigation and then go to the Energy graph and select the Trip tab, you can see it takes elevation into account.

If the route is relatively flat, then you'll probably see a fairly straight line which decreases from upper left to lower right. The image below explains what you'll see on the Trip tab.
1619712861893.png


If there are hills, then you'll see remaining energy will decrease when going uphill and increase when going downhill.
1619712775538.png
 

MorrisonHiker

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Mar 8, 2015
10,579
10,635
Colorado
@MorrisonHiker love that first image with the annotated Energy graph. Very helpful.
Thanks. It's not mine but I just googled and found it quickly. It does a good job of explaining the graph.

In the first image above, you can see that the car is expected to arrive with 15% instead of the originally estimated 20%. This could be due to weather (wind, snow, etc.), speed or other factors. You can slow down to get try to get back to the estimated arrival charge level. If your trip is above the estimated line and expected to arrive with a higher SoC than first calculated, you can potentially speed up, getting there faster but still arriving at the estimated battery charge level.
 
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ratsbew

Active Member
Mar 3, 2012
1,293
1,044
O'Fallon, IL
The energy graph is a work of art. I love that thing. It makes road tripping a breeze.

Pro tip: When you plug in to supercharge, set your next destination and then bring up the trip graph, it will update in realtime to show you when you can make it to your destination. I charge until it shows that I'll make the next charger with 10% (weather permitting). I can normally leave 5-10 minutes sooner than the trip planner otherwise indicates.
 
Yes, if you use the car's navigation and then go to the Energy graph and select the Trip tab, you can see it takes elevation into account.

If the route is relatively flat, then you'll probably see a fairly straight line which decreases from upper left to lower right. The image below explains what you'll see on the Trip tab.
View attachment 658017

If there are hills, then you'll see remaining energy will decrease when going uphill and increase when going downhill.
View attachment 658015
yes, absolutely agree with all that. A really nice example by hiker. I often take the trip from Sparks to Fremont and back. It's 4,600 feet of elevation change. The wife is sometimes baffled when charging in Sacramento before going up the hill. The car will indicate it is about 110 miles to get home, but the navigation tells us we need 150 miles of charge to get there. Of course it want's a 10% safety margin, but it also knows that there is an elevation change of about 7,000 feet to get to the top of Donner Summit before going back down the hill about 2,000 feet. At the top, it indicates we would be out of charge by the time we get home, but as Hiker says, it gains back about 35 miles going down the hill.
 
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I'm doing our first road trip that will need charging (LA to Vegas; actually the first time doing this trip by car!). ABRP considers elevation change when computing battery drain, but I'm wondering: if I point the Tesla Nav to Vegas, will it take into consideration energy drain from elevation change? Basically I want to be sure I don't pass a Supercharger thinking the car will make it over a portion with a big elevation change and get stranded... thanks!
Oh and to add to my post. The one thing the car can't take into consideration is wind and depending on where you are travelling, that could be a problem. So don't cut it close. Just as with an ICE car, I never depend on the car telling me I will get there with juice to spare. There could always be the chance of a strong head wind on a long trip, severe road delay where I might have to divert to a different route, or in the case of a big fire in California last year,everyone was forced to turn around and go back. I barely made it to a supercharger.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: drdumont and FlyF4
The energy graph is a work of art. I love that thing. It makes road tripping a breeze.

Pro tip: When you plug in to supercharge, set your next destination and then bring up the trip graph, it will update in realtime to show you when you can make it to your destination. I charge until it shows that I'll make the next charger with 10% (weather permitting). I can normally leave 5-10 minutes sooner than the trip planner otherwise indicates.
To quote Martin and Charlie Sheen (They say it with the exact same intonation) "I did not know that!".
Thanks!
 
Disagree...went 80 miles from 200' elevation to 5,500' elevation in Tesla X on 88% charge and was at 15% at destination.

It uses almost DOUBLE the battery in that circumstance. Would like a formula for model, distance, rise in altitude equals battery use.
I guess I don’t understand what you disagree with. The car does in fact factor in elevation. That’s been proven above. What you have not told us about your drive is weather conditions (temp and wind), speeds you drove, the load you had, and your driving habits. The formula you suggest is entirely too simple and would be even worse and predictions.
 
I guess I don’t understand what you disagree with. The car does in fact factor in elevation. That’s been proven above. What you have not told us about your drive is weather conditions (temp and wind), speeds you drove, the load you had, and your driving habits. The formula you suggest is entirely too simple and would be even worse and predictions.
all within normal range
 

FlatSix911

Porsche 918 Hybrid
Jun 15, 2015
7,568
7,888
Silicon Valley
Oh and to add to my post. The one thing the car can't take into consideration is wind and depending on where you are travelling, that could be a problem. So don't cut it close. Just as with an ICE car, I never depend on the car telling me I will get there with juice to spare. There could always be the chance of a strong head wind on a long trip, severe road delay where I might have to divert to a different route, or in the case of a big fire in California last year,everyone was forced to turn around and go back. I barely made it to a supercharger.
It appears that Tesla will now account for additional environmental factors when calculating range.


"Tesla is now starting to account for wind, air density, and more when doing range calculations in an attempt to be more accurate. Range calculations are difficult regardless of the type of powertrain, electric or internal combustion engine. There are just so many factors that can affect the efficiency of a vehicle on a road that it is hard to determine how far it can go on a full battery pack or tank of gas. But it is important. I’d argue that accurate range prediction is better at curbing range anxiety than longer range.

The automaker has started pushing a new software update (2022.8.2) that includes a few UI changes, better-charging calculations, and a preconditioning update. That’s according to the release notes, but Tesla hacker Green found a few more changes under the hood. It includes accounting for crosswinds and headwinds, air density, and humidity in the energy consumption calculation when the data is available."
 

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