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Door handles vs (expensive) fingernails...grr...

My wife's fingernails are in a battle with the door handles. So far she has lost two nails to the gap between the door and the plate behind the extended handle. Is this happening to anyone else?

Tesla, if you want to sell to professional women you need to have the decision makers reflect the target market. As a stock holder, I encourage Tesla to hire more female engineers & board members.

Oh, and if your answer is that she should learn to use the handle differently I will remind you of Steve Job's winning advice about how to hold the iPhone correctly.
 
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I have had an S since early 2013. Had always had my nails manicured with a squared off tip. No problems. Recently switched to the newer pointed tip and immediate started having my nail slip into the space around the back plate. Scary - just pull it out quickly as soon as I feel it going into the slot. If it ever actually gets caught, I am backed to squared nail tips!
 

Krugerrand

Enough of the 🐩, back to 🐈‍⬛
Jul 13, 2012
12,144
76,886
Tesla friendly place
Not long, not brittle... It's not the nails, it's the handle.

Just asking, since I've not seen or heard any other reference to this type of problem and yet there are a lot of possibilities like nutrition, genetics, how the nail is being filed (pointed vs rounded as an example) or even regular manicuring (as in the use of nail polish remover and addition of nail polishes) that can cause fingernails to become more susceptible to cracking and breaking.

On your 'if you want to sell to professional women' point, it's a bit over the top for a lot of reasons, but the Model X doesn't have the same door handles as the S - so rare/outlier problem solved.
 
I have had an S since early 2013. Had always had my nails manicured with a squared off tip. No problems. Recently switched to the newer pointed tip and immediate started having my nail slip into the space around the back plate. Scary - just pull it out quickly as soon as I feel it going into the slot. If it ever actually gets caught, I am backed to squared nail tips!

Thanks, I'll pass this on.:smile:

- - - Updated - - -

On your 'if you want to sell to professional women' point, it's a bit over the top for a lot of reasons, but the Model X doesn't have the same door handles as the S - so rare/outlier problem solved.

Thanks...
I would say this is a trivial example of a non-trivial issue but I don't think it's over the top. The company does need to hire engineers and board members that are more diverse... not so that they can make a 'woman's car' but so they can make cars better. Considering the habits and use of owners (down to their fingernails) in design, engineering and marketing can't be a bad thing, unless you only think like half the market.
 
I've had my Tesla for a year and have never gotten my nail caught lol. I don't think the is a frequent problem as I've never seen it posted before. I also don't grab the door handle fully as it really just takes a light pull with the tips of my fingers for it to open. Maybe don't wrap your entire hand around the handle?
 
This entire thread cracks me up! Sorry to your wife, I know it sometimes hurts (literally) to loose a nail, but this thread made me laugh the same way I did when I heard my mom complain that her iPhone was not compatible with long fingernails and she that had to type with her knuckle instead of finger tip! (For the record, Mom got around this by buying an exorbitant amount of portable touch screen styluses, which won't work for Model S).
 

JohnSnowNW

Active Member
Feb 13, 2015
2,674
2,988
Minnesota
I just stepped into an alternate universe...

tZOS8.gif
 

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