Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Driving Melbourne to Brisbane in 45 Celcius heat

You read my mind @paulp, I was thinking about how to make that test as accurate as possible have an original non-glass roof model S, I can get access to the same original Blue model S with glass roof and same colour interior.
Just ensure they both are at the same temp before placing in the sun. I suppose its more a question of which gets to the 40 degree auto cool temperature first
 
Was in the cbd today, and the car said it was 52 degrees outside. Explained why it was so hot and why I could hear my aircon from considerable distance. Made for an interesting convo with the lawyer who wasn’t convinced any car could be kept cool with the engine off.....
Anyway at 52 degrees I could definately feel the heat coming through the glass roof, and it was far too hot to even touch the glass, even though the aircon had been on for over an hour.
Once I started moving I could feel the heat reducing
 

Hairyman

Active Member
Jul 24, 2019
1,038
562
Australia
Was in the cbd today, and the car said it was 52 degrees outside. Explained why it was so hot and why I could hear my aircon from considerable distance. Made for an interesting convo with the lawyer who wasn’t convinced any car could be kept cool with the engine off.....
Anyway at 52 degrees I could definately feel the heat coming through the glass roof, and it was far too hot to even touch the glass, even though the aircon had been on for over an hour.
Once I started moving I could feel the heat reducing
Wow!
 
I was thinking about how to make that test as accurate as possible have an original non-glass roof model S, I can get access to the same original Blue model S with glass roof and same colour interior.
That would be a good test.

I’d be massively shocked if the aluminium and joke layer of insulation is a better heat reflector than the coated glass. It seems to me that tesla are doing the glass roof for energy efficiency.
I don't have any scientific measurements or proof to dispute that, but below is my personal experience.
I have 4 cars currently at my house, car 1 is model 3, car 2 has a steel roof with a glass sunroof and a retractable mesh shade, car 3 has a black steel roof, car 4 a white steel roof. Driving in the middle of a hot day, I can clearly feel the most amount of heat from the model 3's roof, whether it means higher cabin temperature or not I am not sure. In car 2, I only notice the heat under the glass sunroof, not other part of the roof. When I drive the model 3 and car 2 in summer, I often have to point the air conditioning towards the roof to be more comfortable. I don't feel any heat from the roof in car 3 and 4, those 2 with the full steel roofs. It is not because I can see the sun coming through the glass roof and therefore I feel the heat more. I don't notice the sun through the roof, and I wear sunglasses when I drive.

I have to say though my model 3's untinted windows seem to be have better heat rejection than my other car with no window tinting.
 
Last edited:
  • Informative
Reactions: baillies
Sorry, unclear - the white steel roof Hyundai is unbearably hot while the Model S, well, isn't. (I don't have thermometer readings but the difference is obvious, probably 8-10 degrees). The roof probably has not got much to do with it, as the windows are not tinted on the Hyu and it's a smaller car.
 
That would be a good test.


I don't have any scientific measurements or proof to dispute that, but below is my personal experience.
I have 4 cars currently at my house, car 1 is model 3, car 2 has a steel roof with a glass sunroof and a retractable mesh shade, car 3 has a black steel roof, car 4 a white steel roof. Driving in the middle of a hot day, I can clearly feel the most amount of heat from the model 3's roof, whether it means higher cabin temperature or not I am not sure. In car 2, I only notice the heat under the glass sunroof, not other part of the roof. When I drive the model 3 and car 2 in summer, I often have to point the air conditioning towards the roof to be more comfortable. I don't feel any heat from the roof in car 3 and 4, those 2 with the full steel roofs. It is not because I can see the sun coming through the glass roof and therefore I feel the heat more. I don't notice the sun through the roof, and I wear sunglasses when I drive.

I have to say though my model 3's untinted windows seem to be have better heat rejection than my other car with no window tinting.
Tesla roof was aluminium not steel before it became coated glass. You will note my reference to aluminium in building materials. The thermal performance of steel and aluminium are very different.
 
Anyone have a thermal camera to get reading off the different roof materials
and the interior of a glass roofed car and steel roof.
It wont help as the felt liner removes the ability to touch the heat on the underside of the glass. Once the heat is within the cabin you cant stop it (which is why cars get hot) but felt or fabric by its nature always feels cooler than aluminium, steel, or glass. If the fabric is heavy enough (such as heavy curtains) it can cause a heat layer that reduces the heat transfer (or cold loss in winter).
 
I just did a road trip from Brisbane to Bundaberg and back, driving mostly in the middle of the day. It was around 35 outside. Before I had the roof shades and tinting done (especially the tinting) the a/c had to be on at least down to 20 to make the cabin comfortable. I'm now using 23, and it's just as comfortable. The Rayno S9 tint has made a massive difference with its 90+% IR rejection.

Arriving at the Maroochydore supercharger with only 7% battery was a bit arse-clenching though, especially since the trip planner said I'd have 12 when I started out. :eek:
 
  • Informative
Reactions: baillies

MC3OZ

Active Member
Jul 25, 2019
3,338
19,089
QLD Australia
I just did a road trip from Brisbane to Bundaberg and back, driving mostly in the middle of the day. It was around 35 outside. Before I had the roof shades and tinting done (especially the tinting) the a/c had to be on at least down to 20 to make the cabin comfortable. I'm now using 23, and it's just as comfortable. The Rayno S9 tint has made a massive difference with its 90+% IR rejection.

Arriving at the Maroochydore supercharger with only 7% battery was a bit arse-clenching though, especially since the trip planner said I'd have 12 when I started out. :eek:

Where you travelling for over an hour?

My worst case estimate is 5% per hour for AC, an actual test with a stationary car was 2%.
I am waiting to measure this on a long trip...
 
I just did a road trip from Brisbane to Bundaberg and back, driving mostly in the middle of the day. It was around 35 outside. Before I had the roof shades and tinting done (especially the tinting) the a/c had to be on at least down to 20 to make the cabin comfortable. I'm now using 23, and it's just as comfortable. The Rayno S9 tint has made a massive difference with its 90+% IR rejection.

Arriving at the Maroochydore supercharger with only 7% battery was a bit arse-clenching though, especially since the trip planner said I'd have 12 when I started out. :eek:
Good thing you had the tinting, otherwise extra AC would have made that worse ;)
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top