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Driving Range less than expected with new MY-LR

Ron J.

MY LR, Blue-Bk, OD 9/30/21 - Delivered 5/26/22
Nov 20, 2021
309
352
Fort Myers, FL
I took delivery of a new MY-LR5 2+ weeks ago (w/ stock 19" wheels and areo hubcaps installed) and have driven it about 350 miles so far. The MY replaced a 2017 Chevy Volt, which was a Plug-in Hybrid EV with a EV EPA range of 52 miles before the IC Engine came into use. With the Volt I routinely got around 55 miles for my typical suburban driving and at times 60+ miles for trips when there was no higher speed freeway driving involved. For purely interstate driving at around 70 mph the range dropped to 45+ miles. Bottom line for the Volt was the EPA range number matched my actual results fairly well.

Now for my new MY-LR5 the EPA range rating of 330 miles means the watts per mile would be about 234 W/Mi. I do live in Florida and it's now summer with temps in the low 90=s so the A/C is running full time when I'm driving. However, even for non-freeway trips where my driving speed is typically 45 to 55 mph with occasional stops for traffic/lights, my energy use has be running around 280 W/Mi and for trips with mostly freeway driving at 70mph the energy usage goes up to 320 to 360 W/mi. This is when I'm avoiding any fast acceleration and using the cruise control set to 70 mph on the freeway. I have not had any trips so far that shows energy usage anywhere close the 234 W/Mi needed to meet the EPA range rating and perhaps the heavy A/C use may prevent getting all the way down to the 234 W/Mi value . However, I am disappointed so far with the real world range of the MY. What are other MY-LR owners experiences?.
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,977
6,644
Maryland
I took delivery of a new MY-LR5 2+ weeks ago (w/ stock 19" wheels and areo hubcaps installed) and have driven it about 350 miles so far. The MY replaced a 2017 Chevy Volt, which was a Plug-in Hybrid EV with a EV EPA range of 52 miles before the IC Engine came into use. With the Volt I routinely got around 55 miles for my typical suburban driving and at times 60+ miles for trips when there was no higher speed freeway driving involved. For purely interstate driving at around 70 mph the range dropped to 45+ miles. Bottom line for the Volt was the EPA range number matched my actual results fairly well.

Now for my new MY-LR5 the EPA range rating of 330 miles means the watts per mile would be about 234 W/Mi. I do live in Florida and it's now summer with temps in the low 90=s so the A/C is running full time when I'm driving. However, even for non-freeway trips where my driving speed is typically 45 to 55 mph with occasional stops for traffic/lights, my energy use has be running around 280 W/Mi and for trips with mostly freeway driving at 70mph the energy usage goes up to 320 to 360 W/mi. This is when I'm avoiding any fast acceleration and using the cruise control set to 70 mph on the freeway. I have not had any trips so far that shows energy usage anywhere close the 234 W/Mi needed to meet the EPA range rating and perhaps the heavy A/C use may prevent getting all the way down to the 234 W/Mi value . However, I am disappointed so far with the real world range of the MY. What are other MY-LR owners experiences?.
2017 Volt owner, myself. I have driven ~8k miles in my Long Range Model Y. The Volt Wh/mi for the EPA rating was 267 Wh/mi. I am at 269 Wh/mi in the Model Y overall for 4 seasons for two years.

You are still new to driving the Model Y, it takes time to learn to drive smoothly for maximum efficiency. The regenerative braking in the Model Y (no longer user adjustable for low regen, only standard regen is provided) is much stronger than the Volt's regenerative braking even accounting for driving the Volt in L shifter position. Over time you will learn to feather the accelerator pedal rather than fully lifting your foot. When accelerating you will find that you don't need to apply much throttle for daily driving and still pull well ahead of most of the other vehicles from a stop light.

Tire pressure: Be sure the tires are fully inflated to the recommended 42 PSI (as measured cold in the A.M., not in direct sun.) I prefer 44 PSI cold tire pressure with the OE Continental Procontact RX tires.

In Florida you would see some improvement in efficiency (lower energy consumption) if you have the windshield and other side glass tinted with a good ceramic tint film. The roof can be tinted but the benefit over the factory IR and UV treatment that comes with the roof glass makes less of an improvement over tinting the other glass surfaces. Do get a sunshade for the glass roof. (Tesla sells a mesh fabric sunshade or you can find a large selection of one piece and two piece sunshades for the glass roof.)

When I drive on the highway I observe 260Wh/mi or higher depending on speed and use of the climate control system to stay warm (not an issue where you live.) 280Wh/mi is fine considering there may be a slight head wind or cross wind.

The Tesla data for the EPA combined city/highway range estimate does not include driving over 45 MPH and there is no use of the climate control system for heating or air conditioning. The only way to drive the Model Y and get close to the EPA estimated range or Wh/mi figure is to live where no cabin heating or AC is regularly needed (HVAC fan only) and drive at similar average speed, i.e. under ~50 MPH, on flat terrain with no head wind or cross wind on dry roads. For many, depending the wheel and tires used the Wh/mi can be expected to be between 250Wh/mi and 300Wh/mi with ~270Wh/mi being a consistent result for many Model Y drivers. For every 5 MPH that you lower your highway speed you would see an increase in efficiency and range of almost 10%.
 
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glide

Well-Known Member
Jun 6, 2018
5,340
7,486
USA
I took delivery of a new MY-LR5 2+ weeks ago (w/ stock 19" wheels and areo hubcaps installed) and have driven it about 350 miles so far. The MY replaced a 2017 Chevy Volt, which was a Plug-in Hybrid EV with a EV EPA range of 52 miles before the IC Engine came into use. With the Volt I routinely got around 55 miles for my typical suburban driving and at times 60+ miles for trips when there was no higher speed freeway driving involved. For purely interstate driving at around 70 mph the range dropped to 45+ miles. Bottom line for the Volt was the EPA range number matched my actual results fairly well.

Now for my new MY-LR5 the EPA range rating of 330 miles means the watts per mile would be about 234 W/Mi. I do live in Florida and it's now summer with temps in the low 90=s so the A/C is running full time when I'm driving. However, even for non-freeway trips where my driving speed is typically 45 to 55 mph with occasional stops for traffic/lights, my energy use has be running around 280 W/Mi and for trips with mostly freeway driving at 70mph the energy usage goes up to 320 to 360 W/mi. This is when I'm avoiding any fast acceleration and using the cruise control set to 70 mph on the freeway. I have not had any trips so far that shows energy usage anywhere close the 234 W/Mi needed to meet the EPA range rating and perhaps the heavy A/C use may prevent getting all the way down to the 234 W/Mi value . However, I am disappointed so far with the real world range of the MY. What are other MY-LR owners experiences?.
Tesla’s EPA estimates are based on optimal pack temp, optimal external temp, optimal rolling resistance, optimal elevation, no climate control, at a speed of 50mph.

In other words; you will never achieve their rated range in real-world driving.
 
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Ron J.

MY LR, Blue-Bk, OD 9/30/21 - Delivered 5/26/22
Nov 20, 2021
309
352
Fort Myers, FL
Tesla’s EPA estimates are based on optimal pack temp, optimal external temp, optimal rolling resistance, optimal elevation, no climate control, at a speed of 50mph.

In other words; you will never achieve their rated range in real-world driving.
But the EPA range estimate for EVs is based on a specific EPA defined test cycle intended to simulate highway and city driving conditions including ambient temperature, etc. . I know it's done on a dynamometer and not operating on a real road. However, some other EVs do get near the EPA range numbers when operated in the real world.
 

ucmndd

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2016
9,073
17,594
California
But the EPA range estimate for EVs is based on a specific EPA defined test cycle intended to simulate highway and city driving conditions including ambient temperature, etc. . I know it's done on a dynamometer and not operating on a real road. However, some other EVs do get near the EPA range numbers when operated in the real world.
Read and learn. Tesla games the system for big advertised numbers that are unachievable in reality.

 

glide

Well-Known Member
Jun 6, 2018
5,340
7,486
USA
But the EPA range estimate for EVs is based on a specific EPA defined test cycle intended to simulate highway and city driving conditions including ambient temperature, etc. . I know it's done on a dynamometer and not operating on a real road. However, some other EVs do get near the EPA range numbers when operated in the real world.
Not saying you’re wrong but if that is the case, how do companies like Tesla get away with way overestimating their range and companies like Porsche/Audi underestimate it to be more in line with real world conditions?

Tesla’s EPA ratings are pure witchcraft.

Edit: I found the answer. They are playing pretty fast and loose with the testing adjustment factor. And Tesla is the only manufacturer doing this.

 
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You will not get EPA rated range in any modern Tesla in any real world conditions.

There’s really not much more to say than that.
Coming back from our cabin. Battery charge 79% down to 32%. Used FSD & AP, set to 4 MPH over the speed limit (59 MPH on state highways most of the way, 64 MPH on the interstate for the last ⅓ of the trip)

88080FAD-78AF-4381-A7DF-A37A007F5387.jpeg
 

ucmndd

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2016
9,073
17,594
California
Coming back from our cabin. Battery charge 79% down to 32%. Used FSD & AP, set to 4 MPH over the speed limit (59 MPH on state highways most of the way, 64 MPH on the interstate for the last ⅓ of the trip)

View attachment 816024
Congratulations. What’s the elevation change between your cabin and home? Which direction was the wind blowing? According to your own signature your lifetime average is FAR above that at 287wh/mi, so you’ve more or less made my point for me.

Your anecdotal evidence from one trip is super convincing, but I stand by my assertion. Tesla EPA range numbers in current models are wholly unrealistic, because Tesla wants them that way.

They used to be much closer to reality. I can regularly get more or less 1:1 rated vs. actual miles in my 2016 Model S. Current models, not a chance.
 

drtimhill

Active Member
Apr 25, 2019
3,310
4,305
Seattle
I took delivery of a new MY-LR5 2+ weeks ago (w/ stock 19" wheels and areo hubcaps installed) and have driven it about 350 miles so far. The MY replaced a 2017 Chevy Volt, which was a Plug-in Hybrid EV with a EV EPA range of 52 miles before the IC Engine came into use. With the Volt I routinely got around 55 miles for my typical suburban driving and at times 60+ miles for trips when there was no higher speed freeway driving involved. For purely interstate driving at around 70 mph the range dropped to 45+ miles. Bottom line for the Volt was the EPA range number matched my actual results fairly well.

Now for my new MY-LR5 the EPA range rating of 330 miles means the watts per mile would be about 234 W/Mi. I do live in Florida and it's now summer with temps in the low 90=s so the A/C is running full time when I'm driving. However, even for non-freeway trips where my driving speed is typically 45 to 55 mph with occasional stops for traffic/lights, my energy use has be running around 280 W/Mi and for trips with mostly freeway driving at 70mph the energy usage goes up to 320 to 360 W/mi. This is when I'm avoiding any fast acceleration and using the cruise control set to 70 mph on the freeway. I have not had any trips so far that shows energy usage anywhere close the 234 W/Mi needed to meet the EPA range rating and perhaps the heavy A/C use may prevent getting all the way down to the 234 W/Mi value . However, I am disappointed so far with the real world range of the MY. What are other MY-LR owners experiences?.
Wait for the tires to break-in .. they are sticky at first and this can impact initial range.
 

TomServo

Active Member
Apr 10, 2014
2,554
1,864
Belleville IL
The EPA should "close all loopholes" and force ALL manufacturers to accept and use the same testing protocols. Having said that on 4 long road trips in our 2020 LR AWD Y (1900 miles R/T) I have averaged 280 wh/mi. That was driving from southern IL to southern MD via I-64 to Richmond then north on I-95.

I precondition while on SHORE POWER before leaving the house, even if it's for a few minutes and if I'm running a bunch of short errands I will leave the HVAC running so I don't have to waste energy recooling or heating the cabin. That waste a lot of energy. Plus it's nice returning to a COOLED or HEATED car.

My lifetime since July 2020 is sitting at 265 wh/mi. I too came from a 2017 Volt and that experience taught me how to maximize range. I set my tire PSI at 44 COLD and typically drive NO MORE THAN 5 OVER THE POSTED LIMIT. We are retired and in no hurry. Speed kills range.
 
2017 Volt owner, myself. I have driven ~8k miles in my Long Range Model Y. The Volt Wh/mi for the EPA rating was 267 Wh/mi. I am at 269 Wh/mi in the Model Y overall for 4 seasons for two years.

You are still new to driving the Model Y, it takes time to learn to drive smoothly for maximum efficiency. The regenerative braking in the Model Y (no longer user adjustable for low regen, only standard regen is provided) is much stronger than the Volt's regenerative braking even accounting for driving the Volt in L shifter position. Over time you will learn to feather the accelerator pedal rather than fully lifting your foot. When accelerating you will find that you don't need to apply much throttle for daily driving and still pull well ahead of most of the other vehicles from a stop light.

Tire pressure: Be sure the tires are fully inflated to the recommended 42 PSI (as measured cold in the A.M., not in direct sun.) I prefer 44 PSI cold tire pressure with the OE Continental Procontact RX tires.

In Florida you would see some improvement in efficiency (lower energy consumption) if you have the windshield and other side glass tinted with a good ceramic tint film. The roof can be tinted but the benefit over the factory IR and UV treatment that comes with the roof glass makes less of an improvement over tinting the other glass surfaces. Do get a sunshade for the glass roof. (Tesla sells a mesh fabric sunshade or you can find a large selection of one piece and two piece sunshades for the glass roof.)

When I drive on the highway I observe 260Wh/mi or higher depending on speed and use of the climate control system to stay warm (not an issue where you live.) 280Wh/mi is fine considering there may be a slight head wind or cross wind.

The Tesla data for the EPA combined city/highway range estimate does not include driving over 45 MPH and there is no use of the climate control system for heating or air conditioning. The only way to drive the Model Y and get close to the EPA estimated range or Wh/mi figure is to live where no cabin heating or AC is regularly needed (HVAC fan only) and drive at similar average speed, i.e. under ~50 MPH, on flat terrain with no head wind or cross wind on dry roads. For many, depending the wheel and tires used the Wh/mi can be expected to be between 250Wh/mi and 300Wh/mi with ~270Wh/mi being a consistent result for many Model Y drivers. For every 5 MPH that you lower your highway speed you would see an increase in efficiency and range of almost 10%.
This is a great response - I’m kind of surprised how new owners get disappointed when they can reach epa “estimates - “ - enjoy your car - skip the stats for a few weeks 😂
 
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You will not get EPA rated range in any modern Tesla in any real world conditions.

There’s really not much more to say than that.
I got slightly better than the rated range in very real world conditions. there's not much more to say than that.
Congratulations. What’s the elevation change between your cabin and home? Which direction was the wind blowing? According to your own signature your lifetime average is FAR above that at 287wh/mi, so you’ve more or less made my point for me.

Your anecdotal evidence from one trip is super convincing, but I stand by my assertion. Tesla EPA range numbers in current models are wholly unrealistic, because Tesla wants them that way.

They used to be much closer to reality. I can regularly get more or less 1:1 rated vs. actual miles in my 2016 Model S. Current models, not a chance.
I have no idea what the elevation change is - there are some hills but it's a relatively flat trip. Likewise I don't know the winds since I was in the car. there was a light breeze when I left and a light breeze when I got home. If you looked at my signature, you'll also note that I live in Minneapolis meaning that average includes driving in 2 Minnesota winters - extreme cold, snow, etc, conditions which drastically affect the efficiency of any car. There are also many times I've floored it to merge into traffic, make a turn in traffic, etc (and a few times when I was having fun). Those all add into my final efficiency number.

You asserted that achieving the stated range was impossible to achieve. I just gave you concrete proof that it's not. You can keep digging a hole, but facts are facts. We also have a Honda Odyssey but virtually never get the EPA rated fuel economy in it, either. Do you care to go on a tirade about that, too?

The fact is, the range is achievable but like every other car on the road, there are a myriad of factors that affect efficiency so most people's real world efficiency is lower. That doesn't make Tesla's number a lie, it just means it may not be accurate for you, just like every other EPA estimate on the car lot.
 
This is a great response - I’m kind of surprised how new owners get disappointed when they can reach epa “estimates - “ - enjoy your car - skip the stats for a few weeks 😂
The thing with EVs is many people buy them to be efficient and despite Elon's claims, range anxiety is till a thing. Anxiety may be too strong of a term but EV charging stations are still not ubiquitous like gas stations are so you still need to keep an eye on your battery and plan accordingly.

Of course you also have a brand new Tesla that can take off like a rocket and everyone does that at least a few times. Just like with an ICE car hard acceleration wrecks your economy.
 
2017 Volt owner, myself. I have driven ~8k miles in my Long Range Model Y. The Volt Wh/mi for the EPA rating was 267 Wh/mi. I am at 269 Wh/mi in the Model Y overall for 4 seasons for two years.

You are still new to driving the Model Y, it takes time to learn to drive smoothly for maximum efficiency. The regenerative braking in the Model Y (no longer user adjustable for low regen, only standard regen is provided) is much stronger than the Volt's regenerative braking even accounting for driving the Volt in L shifter position. Over time you will learn to feather the accelerator pedal rather than fully lifting your foot. When accelerating you will find that you don't need to apply much throttle for daily driving and still pull well ahead of most of the other vehicles from a stop light.

Tire pressure: Be sure the tires are fully inflated to the recommended 42 PSI (as measured cold in the A.M., not in direct sun.) I prefer 44 PSI cold tire pressure with the OE Continental Procontact RX tires.

In Florida you would see some improvement in efficiency (lower energy consumption) if you have the windshield and other side glass tinted with a good ceramic tint film. The roof can be tinted but the benefit over the factory IR and UV treatment that comes with the roof glass makes less of an improvement over tinting the other glass surfaces. Do get a sunshade for the glass roof. (Tesla sells a mesh fabric sunshade or you can find a large selection of one piece and two piece sunshades for the glass roof.)

When I drive on the highway I observe 260Wh/mi or higher depending on speed and use of the climate control system to stay warm (not an issue where you live.) 280Wh/mi is fine considering there may be a slight head wind or cross wind.

The Tesla data for the EPA combined city/highway range estimate does not include driving over 45 MPH and there is no use of the climate control system for heating or air conditioning. The only way to drive the Model Y and get close to the EPA estimated range or Wh/mi figure is to live where no cabin heating or AC is regularly needed (HVAC fan only) and drive at similar average speed, i.e. under ~50 MPH, on flat terrain with no head wind or cross wind on dry roads. For many, depending the wheel and tires used the Wh/mi can be expected to be between 250Wh/mi and 300Wh/mi with ~270Wh/mi being a consistent result for many Model Y drivers. For every 5 MPH that you lower your highway speed you would see an increase in efficiency and range of almost 10%.
Or, alternatively, you could just not worry about the nit-picky details and just enjoy your car. Different driving styles, physical variables, etc. can make a difference, but not enough to complain too loudly. Whether you get 270 miles per charge or 300 miles, it all comes down to driving style and speed.
 

DanDi58

Active Member
Jun 22, 2020
2,332
1,886
Dayton NJ
Or, alternatively, you could just not worry about the nit-picky details and just enjoy your car. Different driving styles, physical variables, etc. can make a difference, but not enough to complain too loudly. Whether you get 270 miles per charge or 300 miles, it all comes down to driving style and speed.
'Like' times 6,793. We don't really need yet another thread on this topic.
 
I took delivery of a new MY-LR5 2+ weeks ago (w/ stock 19" wheels and areo hubcaps installed) and have driven it about 350 miles so far. The MY replaced a 2017 Chevy Volt, which was a Plug-in Hybrid EV with a EV EPA range of 52 miles before the IC Engine came into use. With the Volt I routinely got around 55 miles for my typical suburban driving and at times 60+ miles for trips when there was no higher speed freeway driving involved. For purely interstate driving at around 70 mph the range dropped to 45+ miles. Bottom line for the Volt was the EPA range number matched my actual results fairly well.

Now for my new MY-LR5 the EPA range rating of 330 miles means the watts per mile would be about 234 W/Mi. I do live in Florida and it's now summer with temps in the low 90=s so the A/C is running full time when I'm driving. However, even for non-freeway trips where my driving speed is typically 45 to 55 mph with occasional stops for traffic/lights, my energy use has be running around 280 W/Mi and for trips with mostly freeway driving at 70mph the energy usage goes up to 320 to 360 W/mi. This is when I'm avoiding any fast acceleration and using the cruise control set to 70 mph on the freeway. I have not had any trips so far that shows energy usage anywhere close the 234 W/Mi needed to meet the EPA range rating and perhaps the heavy A/C use may prevent getting all the way down to the 234 W/Mi value . However, I am disappointed so far with the real world range of the MY. What are other MY-LR owners experiences?.
Your situation is literally identical to mine a year ago. My delivery was 5/31/21, the beginning of summer. Many of my trips that involve I-75 would get me 300 wh/mi or above, and pure local trips would be around 260. The heat is the big killer of battery power, but rain as well. Your efficiency will decrease, and consumption increase by 10% easily in FL rain storm.

What you'll find welcome is that in 5 months your efficiency will improve A LOT. My winter efficiency here in SW FL is just crazy good. It has come down to 252 wh/mi from my summer numbers in the 280s. 60-70 degrees, no wind, no rain will do wonders on your number. I think my average from Nov-May is somewhere around 225, and it's 50-50 highway/local for me. Admittedly I am a hypermiler, so YMMV.
 

Darmie

Super Member
Supporting Member
Jan 13, 2016
2,564
1,740
Clear Lake TX.
Similar thread here.
Here's my response.
 
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