TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker and becoming a Supporting Member. For more info: Support TMC
Start a Discussionhttps://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/tags/

Driving Style and Battery Longevity

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by randvegeta, Mar 2, 2017.

  1. randvegeta

    randvegeta Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2016
    Messages:
    107
    Location:
    Lithuania
    It seems to be fairly common knowledge that if you want to keep your battery in good condition, the key is to keep the state of charge at a fairly modest level, and avoid regularly charging above 80-90% or allowing it to drop below 10 - 20%.

    But what about rate of charge/discharge? How does how 1 drive and charge affect battery life?

    Does charging slowly (using the 40amp//9.6kw onboard charger) reduce the strain on the battery when compared to using a Chademo or SuperCharger? I.e. is it better to charge slowly or quickly?

    What about driving style and speed? Presumably rapid acceleration can put some additional and unnecessary wear on both the battery and motor. But what would be considered 'too hard'? And what about sustained power / speed? Driving on a flat road with a constant 20kw output seems to be sufficient for around 100km/h, and 130km/h at 30kw and 160km/h at 60kw. 100-130km is probably typical for highway speeds, but does driving at 130km/h have a greater impact on the wear of the battery and motor over 100km/h? How about 160km/h?

    One would assume that the faster you drive the harder it is on the battery, if Chademo charges at a rate of 50KW and SuperChargers at 100kw+ , surely the battery can handle a discharge rate of at least as fast?

    I think it is probably safe to say that one could drive normally and that would be fine for the battery and motor. But would driving slightly faster increase the wear, and reduce the lifespan or would the difference be fairly negligible?

    Appreciate any feedback if anyone knows the answer.
     
  2. Tam

    Tam Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,703
    Location:
    Visalia, CA
    Professor Jeff Dahn (that Tesla is working with him) says the goal is to beat the clock to shorten the time-dependent parasitic reactions and not to prolong it. So a slow charge is not good due to prolonging parasitic reactions. Quick, fast charge is good because it shortens parasitic reactions

    Tesla battery would protect itself and would limit further aggressive drain as needed and you can observe that on the instrument cluster.
     
  3. randvegeta

    randvegeta Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2016
    Messages:
    107
    Location:
    Lithuania
    Regarding Charging: Meaning the fastest available charging option is best. Super Charger better than Chademo and Chademo better than Onboard 9.6kw charger. And there are no adverse affects to the battery either way, but you have less losses with faster charge making it more efficient. Something like that?

    Regarding Discharging: Meaning if you can drive it as fast or slow as you like and there is no appreciable additional wear on the battery or motor. Especially since Teslas will limit the charge/discharge rate (yellow dotted line) to a 'safe' level.

    So basically.. just do whatever you want because Teslas battery management system take care of it for you and you can live/drive care free. The battery will be taken care of so long as you dont fully charge or discharge it beyond the recommended limits.
     
  4. gavine

    gavine Petrol Head turned EV Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Messages:
    1,402
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    Temperature is a large contributor to degradation, specifically, charging a very cold or very warm battery. However, Tesla packs are liquid cooled/heated so the BMS will command a battery warming operation before charging if the battery is too cold and it will chill the battery if it's too warm before accepting a charge. Other than the battery sitting at above 90% charge for extended periods (especially at higher temperatures), or full cycling (0% to 100% to 0%), there's not much else you can do to harm the battery by anything considerable.

    Disclaimer: I have learned all of the above from many TMC discussions and posts that I have read from seemingly very smart people.
     

Share This Page