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Dryer plug v Tesla Plug question

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by GadgetGeek407, Aug 13, 2016.

  1. GadgetGeek407

    GadgetGeek407 Member

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    I was told the Tesla uses the same plug as a dryer at home but my dryer plug has three prongs the tesla plug I have has 4, so does that mean it definitely is a different type of connector? Charging from a regular wall plug its literally like 3 miles an hour with this car being dual charger enabled.


    What miles have you all gone to before charging? Another words if it hits 0 or close to it does the car literally shut down or is there a reserve?
     
  2. MorrisonHiker

    MorrisonHiker Beta Tester

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    The default 240 volt adapter with the UMC is a 4 prong NEMA 14-50 plug. Since your dryer plug only has 3 prongs, it is NEMA 10-30 and probably dates from before 1996 or so. Newer dryer plugs are NEMA 14-30. With enough searching, you can find Tesla adapters for either the 10-30 or 14-30 outlets.

    The Tesla 14-50 plug can charge at 40 amps, charging an S about 29 miles per hour. Either of the dryer plugs would charge at 24 amps and give you about 18 mph.
     
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  3. TexasEV

    TexasEV Active Member

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    Wow, you have lots of confusion in one question.
    First thing you need to do is read the charging page on the Tesla web site.
    Tesla Charging | Tesla
    Tesla does not routinely not use a "dryer plug". Whoever told you that was misinformed, or was using term "dryer plug" generically to mean 240V. The UMC adapter that Tesla comes with is for a 240V 50 A circuit ( NEMA 14-50). That charges the car at 40A. Dryers are 30A circuits and you can charge at 24A with the right adapter, but it's slower charging. Your dryer outlet is the old style 10-30. Tesla used to make an adapter to fit it but no more. I would advise against you using a homemade adapter, that's for people who know what they are doing. Best you have an electrician install a 50A circuit to charge your Tesla (or a HPWC since you have dual chargers) and leave your dryer alone.

    Dual chargers have nothing to do with plugging into any type of outlet. That's for circuits greater than 50A, either a HPWC or high amp J1772.
     
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  4. GSP

    GSP Member

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    "have an electrician install a 50A circuit to charge your Tesla (or a HPWC since you have dual chargers) and leave your dryer alone."

    Good advice.

    Talk2bilal,

    The HPWC is a very good value at $550 and can be set up for any circuit breaker size. Have an electrician calculate how big a breaker your panel can accommodate.

    Good Luck,

    GSP
     
  5. GadgetGeek407

    GadgetGeek407 Member

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    Thanks guys whats the charging time different between nema and HPWC?
     
  6. TexasEV

    TexasEV Active Member

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    Did you look at the Tesla charging link I gave you above? I understand that many of today's more mainstream owners don't RTFM as early adopters did, but I would think they would at least RTFW (W stands for web page).

    This FAQ has more details:
    FAQ: Home Tesla charging infrastructure Q&A
     
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  7. supratachophobia

    supratachophobia Active Member

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    You probably have a 10-30 receptacle. They are hard to find, but Tesla did make an adapter for that outlet. Call your service center to find out if they can locate one. 10-30 will get your about 17-18mph of range.
     
  8. scottf200

    scottf200 Active Member

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    Visuals may help. Ignore red boxes.
    NEMA_simplified_pins.svg (2).png
     

    Attached Files:

  9. FlatSix911

    FlatSix911 918 Hybrid

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    Miles per charge.PNG
    Here is a handy chart for reference ... :cool:
     
  10. roblab

    roblab Active Member

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    Yeah, that's the kicker. A lot of older homes don't have enough extra amps or circuits to put in an 80 amp Tesla charger (or other brand). My entire house is 200 amp, and my sub panel garage is 100 amp. Nowhere for another 100 amp circuit.

    That being said, I have charged at 32 amps for years, and it's never been a problem. My electricity provider lets me start off peak at 8PM, but using 100 miles a day, it takes about six hours, so midnight start would be fine. And who uses 100 miles a day?? What I'm saying is, 80 amps are so rarely needed that the extra $500 is hardly worth it. And I have dual chargers, too, but that's for trips in the wild.
     
  11. Theshadows

    Theshadows Active Member

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    You could possibly put an 80A in your 100A sub panel in your garage.
     
  12. bob_p

    bob_p Member

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    I've had my P85 since early 2013 - and in that time, I've lived in three places, and have used a 30A dryer outlet, dedicated 50A outlet and an HPWC on a 100A circuit. When we built our new house, we had a separate 150A panel added, providing a 100A circuit for fast charging and a 50A circuit for slower charging (for when we get a second Tesla).

    For almost all of the time, charging is only needed overnight, and the slower charging with a 50A or a 30A circuit is fast enough to get a full charge by morning.

    There's probably only been a handful of times when I needed a quick charge during the day at home - when I did the round trip for work, and then needed more charge to make a road trip. But that was before the supercharger network was available in our area - and now, there are SC's on the major routes out of town, so we only need enough charge to get to the first SC - which probably eliminates the need to do faster charging during the day.

    However, when we order our 2nd Model S (soon?), we'll probably still order the dual charging option (over 50 miles of range per hour) and a second HPWC, so both cars will have an HPWC (one at 100A and the second at 50A).
     
  13. supratachophobia

    supratachophobia Active Member

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    To my knowledge, unless the HPWC are set specifically for 100/50amps respectively, they will split the load evenly when daisy chained with the communication cable. So if both cars are equipped with dual chargers and you have 150 amps total, each car will charge 60amps or 45mph of range.
     
  14. Rocky_H

    Rocky_H Member

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    This may sound like a pet peeve, but it’s something I see often on this board, and it contributes to confusion. I know there are a lot of new terms to people who are new to electric cars, but using the term “nema” as if it’s referring to a specific outlet is not right and doesn’t help people who are trying to answer your questions.

    The analogy would be if someone asks what size socket they need for a particular bolt, and the person answers, “metric”. That doesn’t tell what specific size; that’s just the name for the sizing system.

    Each type of outlet has its own name under the NEMA naming system. Things such as 5-15, 6-50, 10-30, 14-30, etc. are the NEMA names for different kinds of outlets. The first number is the category, and the second number is the amps of the circuit that it goes on.

    Here is a site that is really valuable for learning the names of the various outlet types and what they are used for.
    NEMA connector - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
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  15. TexasEV

    TexasEV Active Member

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    Why even bother? It's clear that not only is the OP clueless, but he's not even trying to educate himself.
     
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  16. bob_p

    bob_p Member

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    Only the new HPWCs communicate. For those of us with "classic cars" and the original HPWCs, we can control the power sharing manually. in our case, we have separate 50A and 100A circuits - so we can have one HPWC set to 100A and the other to 50A - and both can operate at the same time.
     
  17. miimura

    miimura Active Member

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    The new load sharing HPWCs cannot share more than 100 amps total, even if they are connected to a 150 amp sub-panel. They have no way to know what the total upstream rating is, they just share whatever the setting is on the Master HPWC. The Slave units are just set to slave, not a unique value that could possibly indicate additional capacity.
     
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  18. supratachophobia

    supratachophobia Active Member

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    Ahh, I see. I did not read it that way in the manual. I'm doing a destination charger right now, so you info is very useful. Thank you.
     

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