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Dual 120V to NEMA 14-50 adapter

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by Madartist, Jul 12, 2013.

  1. Madartist

    Madartist Member

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    Is there a dual 120V to NEMA 14-50 adapter available? I can't seem to find one. If so, does anyone have any experience with it using the UMC? How many miles (or kW) per hour of charge do you get?

    This would seem to be a better choice rather than plugging into the standard 120V alone when other faster charging options are not readily available, such as at a friend's or relative's house.
     
  2. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

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    Yes, search for quick220 or steambrite dual 120v. You can make your own too, and someday I might post a document about doing that, but it is a bit involved to make one.
     
  3. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

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    Be aware that these dual 120v converters all have the limitation that neither receptacle can be GFCI protected which eliminates exterior plugs, kitchen plugs, and many garage plugs. Also, of course, you have to find two receptacles that are not only on different circuit breakers, but on different 120v legs of the electrical panel.
     
  4. Madartist

    Madartist Member

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    #4 Madartist, Jul 13, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2013
    Thanks. I was under the mistaken impression that I could simply plug into the same receptacle. It would have made my life much easier. BTW, when I did the search for the Quick 220, it didn't seem to have the 14-50 plug available. Steambrite does have a 14-50 version, but it seems much bulkier. Do you think the EMW JuiceBox would have an advantage here at all? Is it redundant with an UMC and dual 120V converter? My condo association does not allow any wiring modifications. I think my best bet for charging is to rig some type of dual 120V outlet.
     
  5. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

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    Juice box won't help. Check out your plugs, you don't want to be stringing extension cords around as a permanent solution. Supposedly in CA there is a state law that requires property owners to allow for the install of EV chargers, maybe Florida has something similar.
     
  6. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    And one must be careful as an electrician should wire all plugs the same way (black wire hot) because the reality in AC it does not matte,r some people are not consistent. So when you you plug both together there is a chance you cross wires for a nice pop. Unless you have done a lot of wiring and know how to test first I would not recommend doing this.
     
  7. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

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    Yes, that's why making a dual 120v adapter is involved. You need to use at least two relays (my design uses three) for safety otherwise you'll have problems even if the receptacles are wired correctly. Just wiring things together will result in one of your 120v PLUGS having live 120v on it when you are plugged into the UMC and the other 120v plug is plugged in. That's a big hairy shock hazard.
     
  8. meduri

    meduri Member

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    Anyone tried Quick 220? Does it work? I travel a lot and interested to find if this works.
     
  9. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    Just a quick note that you really won't find these devices for sale readily because of their danger. They violate many provisions of the electrical codes and present an issue for safety grounding because they connect to two different, non-parallel branch circuits.

    You can make them work, but in the case of a wiring failure, you can electrocute someone even with all the bells-and-whistles safety relays in the device.
     
  10. rdrcrmatt

    rdrcrmatt Member

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    I don't get it.. we're talking about using these kinda cheap half assed solutions to charge our Teslas? Are you kidding me? Spend the little extra to actually get a good setup. It's worth spending a bit extra to make sure things are done correctly.

    I just installed a 14-50 on the side of my house using 6AWG wire based on a 50a draw over 50ft (25ft to the receptacle, 20ft UMC). Only cost me about $200 in parts.
     
  11. Hometheatremaven

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    Try reading the first post and maybe you'll get it: "This would seem to be a better choice rather than plugging into the standard 120V alone when other faster charging options are not readily available, such as at a friend's or relative's house."
     
  12. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

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    No doubt. These are solutions typically used when travelling to occasional places that don't have any other better electrical source.
     
  13. boilerbots

    boilerbots Member

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    A 240V outlet is protected by a double pole breaker where both poles trip together. If you try to cheat and use individual single pole breakers by bridging between two 120V outlets you can create various safety problems. For example, you trip one breaker but the other is still closed. Now your device might be keeping the tripped branch energized since the other breaker is still closed.
     
  14. deonb

    deonb Active Member

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    You have the same issue if you just unplug one side. The device has to shut down both branches the moment one side is interrupted - that's pretty much the only thing that a Quick220 does for a living, besides being a fancy extension cord.
     
  15. boilerbots

    boilerbots Member

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    Wow, I am surprised that the Quick220 is actually UL listed, has some safety interlocks (relay) and a double pole breaker. This is very different then the suggestion earlier about making your own. Of course 120V outlets are typically shared circuits so it is hard to know how many amps you might be able to pull without tripping a circuit, where 240V outlets are typically dedicated circuits (at least in a home).
     
  16. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    It was tested against UL1012 ("power units other than class 2"), meaning a simple power supply device. It has not been tested for anything else. Scope is here and the TOC for the standard is here.

    I note that Intertek put up a blurb about the discussion where it says this:
    While most of this is correct, in one key case, it is absolutely incorrect. The NEC does not just refer to infrastructure wiring of buildings and other facilities. It also handles the way that loads are interfaced to the system. You can't use a receptacle and a plug to get around NEC rules. This is a gray area, of course, but the local code compliance officer (AHJ) will be the judge.
     
  17. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

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    If you make your own, you NEED to use relays to protect against shock hazards when only one plug is plugged in (which is every time you use it since you can't plug/unplug both plugs at the same time). You shouldn't just wire things together. A dual-120V device is stretching things potentially to the breaking point, so DEFINITELY use at your own risk!
     
  18. wcalvin

    wcalvin Member

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    If the 120vac outlets are on a 15amp breaker, you are only going to get the usual 12 amps on each leg, so 24 amps total.
    Welding supply places have a box for doing this, as on-site welders really need 240vac.
     
  19. deonb

    deonb Active Member

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    Technically no. You can still draw 12 amps max, only at 240vac. However, watts go from 1.44kw to 2.88kw.
     
  20. CmdrThor

    CmdrThor Member

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    Ahh, so burn down the friend or relative's house instead of your own .. brilliant!
     

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