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Ear pain/Pressure help

The rpmtesla noise reduction kit is easier to apply, cheaper and gives immediate results, especially when supplemented with the additional rubber seals on the rear hatch but mostly helps on road noise, wind noise, and eliminating the rear hatch buffeting and hatch movement (assuming the hatch adjustments are also done).

The noise deadening material (butyl and foam) are more for reducing the low-frequency booming on uneven road and the resonance from the car’s body and frame, especially from the rear (fenders, sub trunk, hatch) where there’s a significant portion of the car that uses thin sheetmetal and just resonates badly; and also reducing some external noise from entering the cabin. Doing this requires some disassembly and tiring effort with the roller and figuring out where and how much to apply, but if you’re desperate to reduce the booming and improve cabin comfort, definitely worth doing.

I should also mention I have the Mountainpass Comfort Adjustable Coilovers which have dramatically improved ride comfort, even on the 21” uberturbines, and overall car driving dynamics; while these have soaked up the bumps well, addressing the noise issues was still necessary for me. I don’t think there’s a more comfortable Model Y on 20 or 21” tires on the road than mine :)
How hard was install and did it make a difference in road noise since it absorbs bumps better? I have a set on order.
 

gundarx

Member
Feb 5, 2020
257
427
Renton, WA
How hard was install and did it make a difference in road noise since it absorbs bumps better? I have a set on order.

With good surface prep (alchohol wipes) should take about an hour and easy to do; watch the install video on rpm’s product page. I don’t think it absorbs bumps better, instead provides better sealing, and likely limits movement with the doors, hatch and hood. Noticeable road noise improvement- see @MY-Y post Noise reduction kits worthwhiled?
 
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Dennisis

Member
Supporting Member
Feb 11, 2020
781
729
Tucson
How hard was install and did it make a difference in road noise since it absorbs bumps better? I have a set on order.
I tried their kit, mainly to keep the channels around the hatch cleaner but ended up taking them off. I prepped well but the seals would still come loose in places and I got tired of re-applying them - YMMV. I didn't notice any noise reduction.
 
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With good surface prep (alchohol wipes) should take about an hour and easy to do; watch the install video on rpm’s product page. I don’t think it absorbs bumps better, instead provides better sealing, and likely limits movement with the doors, hatch and hood. Noticeable road noise improvement- see @MY-Y post Noise reduction kits worthwhiled?
Sorry I should have been more clear, I meant the MPP coilovers.
 

gundarx

Member
Feb 5, 2020
257
427
Renton, WA
How hard was install and did it make a difference in road noise since it absorbs bumps better? I have a set on order.
Sorry I should have been more clear, I meant the MPP coilovers.

I had a good local shop do the suspension install, but there are owners who DIY’d it in the thread, also see impressions from @Vivelemond who really prioritized comfort and noise MountainPass Performance Comfort Coilovers

without going into the driving performance benefits, road impacts are significantly improved and on the softer settings, you can smooth out a lot of road texture, vibrations, and noise.. as the car will not crash into bumps as hard, there’s much less opportunity for crashing noises from the interior (ex. metal sounds from center console, door panels, hatch)
 
Alright time to get super-nerdy. I came across this Swiss study from 2017 about how to deal with low-frequency resonances in passenger cars.

The effectiveness of the suppression of low frequency acoustic resonances with porous sound absorbing structures of multifunctional upholstery materials of car body interior

The language is exceedingly dense and academic, and I admit to not fully understanding everything. But the main message I took away was this: using some good sound-absorbing materials in the interior of the rear area of the vehicle can lower bass-y resonances by 9 to 12 dB.

It appears that they are describing changing out hard plastics with rubbery porous ones, using something akin to the ModelYshelf to isolate the rear space, and also lining the rear seat-backs with similar materials. Unfortunately the exact materials used were defined in super-science language, as opposed to links to items on Amazon! ;)😩

I'd be grateful to anyone who can help translate this into normal-people-English and get a sense for what exactly was being used and how it could be replicated in the Model Y.
 
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Pianewman

Active Member
Oct 28, 2020
1,678
1,224
Fort Worth
Has anyone tried the RPMTesla trunk "bucket" inserts? I'm thinking I might try them, and depending on how snug they are, placing a layer of felt/fabric on the outside of the inserts. It just might cut down on the dreaded low frequency boominess, while creating a bit more function for the trunk.
 
Has anyone tried the RPMTesla trunk "bucket" inserts? I'm thinking I might try them, and depending on how snug they are, placing a layer of felt/fabric on the outside of the inserts. It just might cut down on the dreaded low frequency boominess, while creating a bit more function for the trunk.
what about the Retractable Cargo Bay Cover from RPMTesla, will it works? since i see so many SUV with this cover on the trunk and no noise issue.
 
what about the Retractable Cargo Bay Cover from RPMTesla, will it works? since i see so many SUV with this cover on the trunk and no noise issue.
I made my own to test it. Took a cardboard box, broke it down and shoved it back there. It fit perfectly. I still felt the ear pressure so I figured a real one wouldn't help.

Of course, my case seems to be different from most people in that I feel it with the car sitting still and the door open.
 

blckdmp

Member
Sep 12, 2019
68
358
Vancouver
Of course, my case seems to be different from most people in that I feel it with the car sitting still and the door open.
Hey Scott,
I think the Heat pump's a likely culprit for the sound you're hearing while the car's not moving. There's a thread on this on the Model 3 forum and heat pump seems to be the consensus. I can't remember having heard anything similar in the Model 3 pages before the Heat Pump was introduced. If the Y is particularly resonant at these frequencies, it could easily explain how the Heat Pump and Back hatch are both triggers for the same issue. (ie, they introduce a 30-40Hz signal that is amplified by the body resonance of the car)
Noticed this today: when standing still, there is a low frequency vibration (probably ≤ 40Hz) lasting about 2 seconds, then cycling through every 5-10 seconds thereafter. It seems to originate at a structurally-sensitive point that vibrates the frame of the car. Reminded me a bit of a sub-woofer in a car parked next to me.
 
Hey Scott,
I think the Heat pump's a likely culprit for the sound you're hearing while the car's not moving. There's a thread on this on the Model 3 forum and heat pump seems to be the consensus. I can't remember having heard anything similar in the Model 3 pages before the Heat Pump was introduced. If the Y is particularly resonant at these frequencies, it could easily explain how the Heat Pump and Back hatch are both triggers for the same issue. (ie, they introduce a 30-40Hz signal that is amplified by the body resonance of the car)
Thanks for the info. I will go on the Model 3 forum to see if I can find that.

Any advice on what I can do about it?
 

blckdmp

Member
Sep 12, 2019
68
358
Vancouver
Sorry, I can't find it on the Model 3 forum. Could you or somebody else post a link?

I'm desperately looking for any advice anybody has.
 

polyphonic54

Member
Aug 29, 2019
353
285
USA
I lined the outside of my rear bucket with butyl - it didn't make much difference. The boominess isn't from the bucket area.

My guess is the chassis will require high-quality butyl based constrained layer damping all around, such as what ResoNix is selling. There are some posts on Model 3 soundproofing that go over removal of panels and seats to apply dampening to the frame.

I recently test drove some ICE vehicles to take dBC measurements. To my surprise even notably quiet/comfortable cars like the Lexus ES350 measured around 85-95 dBC on rough roads. The difference to my ear is that the EV SUV booming rings out longer, while the ICE vehicles are generally dampened, especially in the luxury segments.

Interestingly, I did hear some audible booming in a non-luxury ICE SUV, but no ear pressure like in the EV SUVs. Maybe the hum of the engine also helps to even out the frequency spectrum for a more pleasant sound signature. Just imagine listening to an album of music with everything clipped above 70 Hz.
 
Thanks. I don't know if it is the same as mine. They are all hearing something. I just feel a pain in my ears.

Going back to your original post on this, it could be that it excites a different frequency in the Y than in the 3.
 
I ordered the stuff from Amazon you mentioned and did something similar. A few thoughts.

1. I put the foil butyl on the outside of the trunk bucket. It allowed me to cover the bottom as well.
2. I didn't put butyl where you did on the crash supports (shown in your video) because I think it will significantly impact their sliding in during a crash.
3. I put both sound sheets inside the 1/4 panels. I think this was the main benefit.

Overall, the low frequency is a little better. The road noise is quite a bit better - so much that I notice wind noise now. I just ordered the two RPM Tesla kits.

1/4 panel under charge port
View attachment 642785
1/4 panel on passenger's side with sub.

View attachment 642786

Up inside driver's side 1/4. Note, no foam block from Sandy video - quite the echo chamber before I added the material.
View attachment 642787
Butyl on outside of bucket .
View attachment 642788
HI @MY-Y and @gundarx , i like to know is anything like PE Foam will stick and able to tear-off ? i picked up my car on Mar and im afraid this will void the warranty. My wife and i can hear that noise on driver seats and willing to fix it since tesla service center unable to fix it at this moment.
thanks
 

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