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Electric Lawnmowers

Ludus

Member
May 1, 2013
367
126
Michigan
Totally agree. Forget autonomous cars, try an autonomous drone mower service that can go house to house and trim lawns without spewing hydrocarbons!

Cool idea. Autonomous delivery vehicle pulls up and pro robotic mower self deploys and cuts the lawn. It can be any time of day cuz it's all electric and silent. Back on board the mower swaps batteries and gets carried to the next customer. One pro Mower handles a couple dozen lawns, and the entire process has no direct human involvement.
 

bollar

Disgruntled Member
May 1, 2013
2,667
878
Southlake, TX
Cool idea. Autonomous delivery vehicle pulls up and pro robotic mower self deploys and cuts the lawn. It can be any time of day cuz it's all electric and silent. Back on board the mower swaps batteries and gets carried to the next customer. One pro Mower handles a couple dozen lawns, and the entire process has no direct human involvement.

;)

 

dmd2005

Active Member
Oct 5, 2015
1,157
988
Abbotsford, BC, Canada
I ordered a Husqvarna 430x Automower with a starter kit of wire. Plenty of reviews on youtube like here:


Promotion this spring for a free battery powered 100 series Husqvarna trimmer, battery, and charger. This way I only need to use my John Deere X310 for a 1/4 acre in the front of my home and let the Automower do the back 1/2 acre. Can't wait to install and set it up.
 

ElectricTundra

P85D AP1
Feb 5, 2015
911
403
Tundra
Previous attempts at going electric in the yard were met with disappointment. Low power, short run time, etc. Time to try again.

I'm kind of looking at this from a system standpoint to share batteries and chargers. I think I'm down to Echo and EGO with EGO currently having the edge based largely on a wider selection of battery options and more powerful batteries. Consumer reports review of the EGO mower indicate that it may not cut evenly which could be an issue unless I let go of a bit of lawn perfectionism. Uneven cut seems to be an issue for all cordless mowers though.

I was once a fan of Bosch but have heard some worrying things about their more recent offerings and the Pro series cordless stuff is only 36v which I assume (and perhaps a bad assumption) will provide much less power, particularly for things like mowers and chainsaws. Their pro cordless stuff is also hard to find in the U.S.

I'd love to find a comprehensive review that looks at all of the tools of each system but no luck finding such yet.
 

Skotty

2014 S P85 | 2020 3 P19"
Jun 27, 2013
2,438
1,751
Kansas City, MO
Electric mowers are suffering from the same thing electric cars were suffering from before Tesla arrived. We need a Tesla for mowers to step up and build a product that is actually good.

A robotic mower is nice, but I would also like to see quality push powers (even if it's self propelled, I still call it a push mower) and riding mowers. I know some of you have positive reviews of some battery mowers, but that's only because you haven't seen an actual good one yet.
 

deonb

Active Member
Mar 4, 2013
4,057
4,208
Redmond, WA
I have an EGO now. Had a Newton before - and then gas mowers again for the last 5 years.

The EGO is miles above the Newton, and very similar to my gas mower it replaced. It even gets stuck in exactly the same places.

So after the Newton I went back to gas, but I don't think I will again.

It's not quite the Tesla yet, but it is better than the Leaf. Its range is more than mine...
 

bmanke

Member
Mar 1, 2015
74
28
Chesapeake, VA
The voltage is only one piece of the power puzzle. Wattage of the battery is what is truly important when comparing batteries. A 36 volt battery can contain significantly more energy than a 80 volt battery.

There are professional grade battery products on the market- we at STIHL have a comprehensive range. If you have any questions let me know, I would be happy to help you.

Disclaimer: I am the Battery Product Manager for STIHL

Previous attempts at going electric in the yard were met with disappointment. Low power, short run time, etc. Time to try again.

I'm kind of looking at this from a system standpoint to share batteries and chargers. I think I'm down to Echo and EGO with EGO currently having the edge based largely on a wider selection of battery options and more powerful batteries. Consumer reports review of the EGO mower indicate that it may not cut evenly which could be an issue unless I let go of a bit of lawn perfectionism. Uneven cut seems to be an issue for all cordless mowers though.

I was once a fan of Bosch but have heard some worrying things about their more recent offerings and the Pro series cordless stuff is only 36v which I assume (and perhaps a bad assumption) will provide much less power, particularly for things like mowers and chainsaws. Their pro cordless stuff is also hard to find in the U.S.

I'd love to find a comprehensive review that looks at all of the tools of each system but no luck finding such yet.
 
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ElectricTundra

P85D AP1
Feb 5, 2015
911
403
Tundra
A 36v battery cannot generally produce as much power at the shaft as a 56v or 80v though correct? EG, when it comes to pushing through thick grass higher voltage is important? Or is it purely watts so lower voltage with higher amps can produce just as much power at the shaft?

Higher voltage can also help alleviate overheating problems as on a watt for watt basis higher voltage allows lower amps?
 

ElectricTundra

P85D AP1
Feb 5, 2015
911
403
Tundra
I was in Home Depot yesterday looking at what's available. They have exclusive US rights on Echo and some other BEYT (Battery Electric Yard Tools). Echo & EGO still seem the best options. Aside from tech specs and reviews the echo stuff seems a bit better made. They also have an electric head on the trimmer that supposedly works with their other PAS attachments. I've got a PAS-280 that we use with bed redefiner, tiller, blower, and edger that I've been quite happy with. I don't think the electric head has the power for these though except maybe the edger.

There was a rep from their distributer there who said that the electric head will work with any of the attachments including the bed redefiner. I have my doubts. He did offer a deal though. If I ordered a mower online ($399 w/ a 4 Ah battery) and purchased one other tool he'd give me a free 4 Ah battery. He made ample comment that HD has a 90 day no questions return policy and said Echo really wants people to try their BEYT stuff.

I wasn't planning to purchase yesterday but took him up on the offer and bought the chain saw. Planning to try the chainsaw today. The mower will be here on Wed so we'll see how it does.
 

JRP3

Hyperactive Member
Aug 20, 2007
19,769
44,257
Central New York
A 36v battery cannot generally produce as much power at the shaft as a 56v or 80v though correct?
Depends. Power is voltage x amps, so 36V x 100amps = 3,600 watts, 80V x 45amps = 3,600 watts. Higher voltage means more cells in series, which usually translates into lower amp hour capacity, so less current output potential. (Assuming a similar physical sized pack and same cell chemistry.)
 

linkster

Active Member
Apr 22, 2013
1,128
267
USAX2
I don't know about all this volts, watts, power stuff being discussed upthread. What I do know, is that STIHL makes some seriously sick kick A$$ chainsaws that I have used for lot clearing. And every yard maintenance company that I see in my neighborhood, on the road, or working at a commercial property has/uses STHL equipment. I will buy the best equipment I can afford (we chose a Tesla over the Leaf) 'cause I know it is has a slick design, great ergos, high quality, unmatched reliability, along with a much longer service life thus saving me $ over the long-term. I just don't buy Harry Homeowner equipment anymore that is typically sold at the (2) big hardware stores when I can buy top of the line equipment, purchase parts, obtain service by certified techs within a 5 min drive of where I happen to be staying. I will be transitioning to the STIHL cordless platform including lawnmower, blower, battery packs, charger, hedge-trimmer, and edger over the next year or so. I am going to try and see if I can get a discount from my local distributor in FL if I buy all the gear together.
 
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bmanke

Member
Mar 1, 2015
74
28
Chesapeake, VA
Voltage does not equate to the potential power at the cutting attachment. Wattage is also not a pure measure of the performance of the equipment either. The entire product must be looked at as a system. STIHL designs it's equipment in house as a complete system. All STIHL AP powered battery products use brushless electronically controlled motors. They are significantly more powerful and efficient than a brushed motor. Also, due to the electronics our products produce the same power from beginning to end - there is no noticeable power decrease as the battery discharges. This is one of the main reason STIHL battery products are significantly more expensive than what you would find in a box store.

With regard to chainsaws - STIHL designs and manufacturers it's own bar and chains. We designed bars and chains specifically for our battery chain saws. The difference in cutting performance has to be seen to be believed. With our brushless motor and matched bar and chain STIHL battery chain saws have excellent cutting performance.

As fellow Tesla owner - I am happy to answer any questions anyone may have.

Disclaimer: I am the Battery Product Manager at STIHL


A 36v battery cannot generally produce as much power at the shaft as a 56v or 80v though correct? EG, when it comes to pushing through thick grass higher voltage is important? Or is it purely watts so lower voltage with higher amps can produce just as much power at the shaft?

Higher voltage can also help alleviate overheating problems as on a watt for watt basis higher voltage allows lower amps?
 

ElectricTundra

P85D AP1
Feb 5, 2015
911
403
Tundra
Unfortunately Stihl fails for me due to only having a 16" mower so I didn't look much more.

I wonder if the battery folks at Echo and EGO drive BEV's? Ummm. :)
 

bmanke

Member
Mar 1, 2015
74
28
Chesapeake, VA
I think if you did the math you would find its only a few extra passes and only a few extra minutes....

The mower was designed for the European market where smaller mowers are the norm.

Unfortunately Stihl fails for me due to only having a 16" mower so I didn't look much more.

I wonder if the battery folks at Echo and EGO drive BEV's? Ummm. :)
 

hcsharp

Active Member
Jun 7, 2011
3,379
1,340
Vermont
The voltage is only one piece of the power puzzle. Wattage of the battery is what is truly important when comparing batteries. A 36 volt battery can contain significantly more energy than a 80 volt battery.
Those last two sentences are non sequiturs. On the one hand you say wattage of the battery is what is truly important but then your next sentence suggests that energy capacity is more important. It sounds like you're confusing watts and energy.

High voltage is certainly important because it contributes to longer battery life (as opposed to run-time) by making it easier to keep the battery cooler. High wattage in and of itself is not much use if the battery's energy capacity (watt-hours) or voltage is so low that it generates too much heat. What is "truly important" is a good combination of things including high wattage and high energy storage capacity.

However it's great to have you on the forum as both a Tesla driver and Stihl product mgr. I've had good luck with Stihl equipment in the past, although pricey, so I can't help but want to ask you if you know when Stihl will have a set of quality battery powered yard tools with normal capacity (like 22 in mower, 45min run time)? I'm in the market right now to replace my chainsaw and expect to spend between $600 and $1,100 for a high powered saw with at least 22" bar. When do think Stihl will have such a thing (cordless)?
 
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Pando

Member
Apr 3, 2016
380
628
Sandy Ego
I bought the Greenworks Twin Force GMax (40V) in 2013 - that thing has been working flawlessly ever since. I bought most of the other tools without batteries or chargers and just use the two batteries that came with the mower for all the tools (trimmer, hedge cutter, pole saw, chainsaw, blower, and compressor). There are probably better ones out there now (such as the 80V Pro stuff) but mine are still working fine.
 

ElectricTundra

P85D AP1
Feb 5, 2015
911
403
Tundra
I've lived in Europe and agree that smaller mowers like the Stihl 16" are more appropriate for smaller city lots there. Unfortunately I have a 0.40 acre suburban lot. While we're slowly adding rain garden and reducing grass we still have a fair amount of grass to cut.

Width: You must base comparative calculations on actual new cut per pass, not the overall width of the mower. I'm not aware of any mower nor any person using one that can perfectly cut a 100% width each time. A lot also depends on how perfect of a cut you desire, how sharp of a blade you have, and how well a mower mulches. For example, my previous 21" Lawn-Boy required about a 10" overlap per pass as anything less would not mulch properly and leave stuff on top while my current 21" Toro works well with a 6-8" overlap.

So... Assuming you overlap each pass by 8" then a 16" mower will cut 8" per pass while a 21" will cut 13" per pass. So what takes 60 minutes with a 21" will take about 100 minutes with a 16"? If you need a 10" overlap you're looking at 6" per pass vs 11" per pass or about two hours vs one hour. That's a big difference. And then you may need to add in battery changing time along the way (which I'm happy to do for the benefits of electric).

Greenworks: I've heard good things about Greenworks, especially their newer 80v stuff. Like others I have some concern about stability given apparent frequent changes in ownership and branding.
 
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