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Electric vehicles (Not Teslas) failed to start in California High temps

Discussion in 'Electric Vehicles' started by dgindio, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. dgindio

    dgindio dgindio

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    Some electric vehicles not working in extreme heat | Latest News - Home
    When temps in Palm Springs, California hit 122 degrees on 6/20/16, some electric vehicles would not start due to overheated batteries. I have a Tesla Model 3 on order. I've lived in Indio, CA. for 57 years. On 6/20, the temp in Indio hit 123.8 degrees. Hope the Model 3 will hold up with a glass roof and Tesla batteries.
     
    • Informative x 1
  2. chillaban

    chillaban Member

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    Teslas will proactively run the air conditioning compressor while the car is parked and shut off in order to keep the battery pack at an acceptable temperature. Shockingly, not every car does this :(
     
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  3. mobe

    mobe Member

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    Meanwhile, so many ICE cars overheated that there wasn't time on the news to list them!
     
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  4. gene

    gene Active Member

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    I've had my Model S at these temps many times. No problems at all.
     
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  5. Az_Rael

    Az_Rael Active Member

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    My Volt was fine driving through the desert from Phoenix to Fontana on Father's day. Through Palm springs the car registered 122 and I was traveling 70mph. It actually handled the heat nicely all weekend. I also regularly park it baking in the sun for 10 or more hours here in the high desert while at work (zero shade or charging available).

    So some EV's are designed OK for heat. I am glad Tesla has taken this into consideration and designed for it. It seems like I never work somewhere I have shade to park in, and I always live somewhere hot (Palmdale and DFW)
     
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  6. kelly

    kelly Member

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    I'm very surprised to hear that extreme heat is causing these electric vehicles to not operate. We have extreme heat every summer here in Phoenix and I've not heard this before. My Leaf has never refused to start, even on 110+ days.
     
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  7. ZBB

    ZBB Emperor

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    AZ Model S owner here -- this is my 4th year with the S.

    Don't worry about the glass roof -- and I'm sure the Model 3 will be similar. Tesla uses a very good coating on the glass that limits the heat transfer. The interior of the S is no hotter than other cars I've had. When driving, I do not feel heat on my head, and holding a hand up close to the glass has a barely noticeable temp change only when you get within a ~1/4 inch of the glass...
     
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  8. chillaban

    chillaban Member

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    Drove from SJ to Vegas yesterday in 115 degree heat. Not a single issue heat-wise. The compressor was very loud when supercharging while running the AC, but that's a very minor complaint. The car kept the cabin at 68 degrees just fine, and I didn't get any nags about the temperature.
     
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  9. mobe

    mobe Member

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    Just more FUD from electric vehicle opponents.
     
  10. purplewalt

    purplewalt Active Member

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    So, are you suggesting that the media is supposed to apply the same rules to ALL situations?
    For every yin, there is to also be a corresponding yang?

    Seems that would reek of fairness, and all the oil companies and major auto manufacturers (who spend millions advertising in the same local media) would NOT like that.
    C'est dommage.
     
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  11. mkjayakumar

    mkjayakumar Active Member

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    Yes that would too fair, that it would be unfair for the oil men.
     
  12. Branzo90D

    Branzo90D Salt and Pepper

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    Just drove my Model S (P90DL) through Death Valley at air temperatures up to 125 degrees with the AC on at 71 degrees and driving at speeds of up to 65 mph. I do have the glass pano roof as well. No problems, no warnings, nothing! Just drive!

    Tesla has clearly spent much more time and effort on battery management, including battery temperature than any EV manufacturer to date.
     
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  13. Az_Rael

    Az_Rael Active Member

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    I don't know about that. GM has very good battery management as well, as evidenced by the lack of reports of Volts with no A/C in the recent heat wave unlike these guys (Air Conditioning Blowing Hot Air ) etc. Some of them have been told the car was operating per spec.
     
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  14. Branzo90D

    Branzo90D Salt and Pepper

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    #14 Branzo90D, Jun 25, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2016
    Well, a Volt is not exactly a fully electric vehicle, but I take your point.
     
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  15. Az_Rael

    Az_Rael Active Member

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    True, I suppose its 15kWh battery is easier to cool than a giant 90kWh one. I guess its a trade off on the A/C system size. Put a bigger compressor in for AZ summers and everyone is happy. But the folks living in San Diego are now driving around with extra weight that they will never need
     
  16. dgindio

    dgindio dgindio

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    ZBB IN Scottsdale:
    Your post is reassuring about the glass top in
    Tesla vehicles. I burned my hand on the steering wheel of one of my Jeeps this week and the vehicles have traditional car tops.
    DG-Indio, Ca.--formerly Tucson, Az. U of A 1957
     
  17. Canuck

    Canuck Active Member

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    Tesla really got it right with their thermal management system:

    Patent US20100025006 - Electric vehicle thermal management system

    I would have never bought a Leaf but for the fact that I live in the ideal climate for an EV without thermal battery management (the Pacific Northwest). The threads over at the Leaf forums documenting the degradation of the Leaf batteries from owners in Florida, Texas, and other hot climates shows just how bad heat is for a lithium ion battery, and when you combine hot batteries with charging you really have a recipe for disaster. That's why the compressor sound is so loud when Supercharing on a hot day. Yet there's practically silence when Chademoing a Leaf on a hot day -- except for a small fan that blows hot air at the battery -- as if that makes much of a difference. The new so-called "lizard" chemistry in Leaf's batteries doesn't seem to be making much of a difference either. Nissan really needs to take Tesla up on their open patent offer and copy the one above!
     

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