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Euroncap crash test results

Thank you Daniel! Link didn't work as is (seems address text is doubled) - copy, paste and erase of duplicate address worked.

Very interesting way of displaying results. Comparing to other 2014 test results, looks like MBZ C-class outperformed, but couldn't find photos of the actual tests.

Anyone know anything about the following statements from the report (completely new to me, but then I have a 2013 Aug baby): "The Tesla is equipped with an 'active' bonnet. When the system detects that a pedestrian has been struck, actuators lift the bonnet to provide greater clearance to hard structures underneath." ?
 
I looked at that after hearing the bragging about it, but i was a bit disapointed with the 0-100 safety rating for Adult/child/pedestrian/safety assist. Didn't compare very well to the average numbers of Mercedes for example, but also other premium cars.
Model S 82/77/66/71
Maserati* 95/79/74/81
MB C-class 92/84/77/70
Infiniti Q50 86/85/67/81
*Ghibi(!?)
 

Ben W

2008 Roadster, 2017 M3, 2022 MY
Feb 27, 2009
782
795
Santa Barbara, CA
Some interesting tidbits. The Adult safety rating was knocked down (to 82) partially due to a mis-calibrated passenger airbag, which Tesla has since corrected. And the Child safety rating was decreased (to 77) largely due to the clunky touchscreen interface for disabling the passenger-side airbag, and due to the difficulty of properly installing the child seats. (Though once they were installed, they worked quite well.) So these "low" ratings are not an indication that the car is fundamentally unsafe. The low safety-assist score seems to have been due to the lack of autonomous emergency-braking capability. And pedestrians are pretty much hosed; it's not easy to win a fight against a 4600lb chunk of metal. But perhaps the ultrasound sensors in new Model S's will be able to reduce pedestrian incidents once the Autopilot software is installed?
 
Some interesting tidbits. The Adult safety rating was knocked down (to 82) partially due to a mis-calibrated passenger airbag, which Tesla has since corrected. And the Child safety rating was decreased (to 77) largely due to the clunky touchscreen interface for disabling the passenger-side airbag, and due to the difficulty of properly installing the child seats. (Though once they were installed, they worked quite well.) So these "low" ratings are not an indication that the car is fundamentally unsafe. The low safety-assist score seems to have been due to the lack of autonomous emergency-braking capability. And pedestrians are pretty much hosed; it's not easy to win a fight against a 4600lb chunk of metal. But perhaps the ultrasound sensors in new Model S's will be able to reduce pedestrian incidents once the Autopilot software is installed?

Ok, thats interesting. I Didn't look that closely. I hope that means that the version being produced right now would score even higher, considering autopilot, airbag, and the relative ease of fixing the GUI. The pedestrian should absolutely be in a better situation when all the new sensors are activated:) I dont really see what could be problematic with stuffing a child seat in there?

- - - Updated - - -

Then of course one could say that such reasoning could apply to the other cars as well, and that we're just biased fanboys. But it really couldn't apply to others as only tesla is constantly upgrading the car, both the hardware in production and the software through the air.
 
I wonder if this is programmed into the air suspension. Maybe I'll drive over to the mall and test it out on some pedestrians today.

Based on the description above, I think they mean that a pedestrian impact will cause the hood (bonnet) to release to the safety catch, providing more cushioning to absorb energy as the person falls onto it.
 

hobbes

Active Member
Feb 11, 2013
3,238
24,198
Germany
Based on the description above, I think they mean that a pedestrian impact will cause the hood (bonnet) to release to the safety catch, providing more cushioning to absorb energy as the person falls onto it.

You can actually see it at 1:19 - the hood is somewhat up when they to the head-to-hood pedestrian test. So I guess that happens on impact with the legs, so when the upper body hits the hood split seconds later it makes it somewhat softer:

Euro NCAP Crash Test of Tesla Model S 2014 - YouTube
 

ratsbew

Active Member
Mar 3, 2012
1,296
1,054
O'Fallon, IL
Look at the drivetrain inertia during the frontal collision. The rear wheels keep spinning.

Just in case you haven't seen them yet, here is the official video of the crash test(s):


As important as these tests are, I always cringe when I see these beautiful S's being destroyed on purpose. :crying:
(Especially as I would love to have one but can't - for several reasons...)
 
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