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Experience with Tesla Maps

I went on my first long trip in my 2022 Model 3 Tesla. We drove from NJ up to Toronto and then Ottawa, Canada. Most of the time the trip mapped out by the Tesla map worked well, but on the drive home from Ottawa to NJ, it picked a route that went through a bunch of back roads where there wasn't a supercharger nearby. The battery got down to 13% before we found a super charger when we got close to Rt 87.

Here is the Apple Map route I expected to take, basically going down Rt 81 in NY to NJ. But the Tesla map had me drive across the Adirondack park in the middle over to Rt 87. Not only was there no superchargers between Rt 81 and Rt 87, it also had very winding roads, which I'm sure took more battery power, not to mention not being able to go 65 MPH that I would have gone on a major interstate highway like Rt 81.

IMG_4027.jpeg


My battery got down to 13% before reaching the supercharger in Chestertown, NY, just off Rt 87. From there we were fine, able to charge one more time off Rt 87 and comfortably arrive home. When my battery got down below 20% I was worried that I might run out of electricity before being able to make it to the next available charge. So 2 questions, why did the Tesla map choose this route that had less superchargers along the way? Is there a way to change the route that Tesla automatically picked? I would have liked to follow the Rt 81 path home, but I have no idea how to force the Tesla map to change.
 
If you have a recent software version, you can now choose from alternate routes when you start navigation. The alternate routes go away after a short while, but if you expand the navigation directions you'll see them again.

It's possible that the car took a different route because of traffic or a supercharger was out of commission, but it's hard to be sure. Sometimes my car suggests bad routes, so if it seems wrong, try Google or Apple Maps and see what they say. Sometime a route that seems wrong is better because of traffic.
 
Is there a way to change the route that Tesla automatically picked? I would have liked to follow the Rt 81 path home, but I have no idea how to force the Tesla map to change.

I have yet to take a long trip but I have been experimenting with Tesla navigation. I have some places that I will be visiting so I entered some test trips. Navigation would plot routes that I would never use. I found that if I added 1 or 2 way points along my preferred route that I could coax navigation to go my way. I could also do this by dropping a pin (do a long press on a desired spot on the map). I make sure Superchargers are along my preferred route.
 
I have yet to take a long trip but I have been experimenting with Tesla navigation. I have some places that I will be visiting so I entered some test trips. Navigation would plot routes that I would never use. I found that if I added 1 or 2 way points along my preferred route that I could coax navigation to go my way. I could also do this by dropping a pin (do a long press on a desired spot on the map). I make sure Superchargers are along my preferred route.
Ah, good idea. I could have added superchargers along Rt 81 to keep it on that highway.
 

Transformer

Do the math. Save the world. — Mark Leon
Dec 26, 2019
712
557
Silicon Valley
Sometimes Tesla nav has routed me off the freeway onto little back roads to avoid traffic. In one case it was a dark, windy road one lane wide. When the back roads paralleled the freeway, I could see that it did not save time. Another time it did save a lot of time branching off to a smaller highway just before a traffic jam.

In addition to the earlier ideas, you can let nav replan when you drivr the desired route.

For long routes, I usually use ABRP to plan it then use Tesla to navigate (and precondition) to the next supercharger.
 
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Sometimes Tesla nav has routed me off the freeway onto little back roads to avoid traffic. In one case it was a dark, windy road one lane wide. When the back roads paralleled the freeway, I could see that it did not save time. Another time it did save a lot of time branching off to a smaller highway just before a traffic jam.

In addition to the earlier ideas, you can let nav replan when you drivr the desired route.

For long routes, I usually use ABRP to plan it then use Tesla to navigate (and precondition) to the next supercharger.
Interesting, I just tried planning my trip from Ottawa in ABRP and it also offered the same route the Tesla map took me on as the first choice. It did provide two alternate routes, one of which was the Rt 81 trip I show above. Part of the reason I like that route better is that there are more charging options along the way. I get nervous when the battery is low and there is no charging options anywhere near. That day the temperature was down to 20 degrees and I didn't want to be stuck in the middle of nowhere with no heat in the car. What happens if you run out of battery along the side of the road? Does roadside assistance send some kind of charging vehicle to give you enough battery to get to a charging station? Or do they have to tow the car?
 
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brkaus

Well-Known Member
Jul 8, 2014
9,088
7,841
Austin, TX
Interesting, I just tried planning my trip from Ottawa in ABRP and it also offered the same route the Tesla map took me on as the first choice. It did provide two alternate routes, one of which was the Rt 81 trip I show above. Part of the reason I like that route better is that there are more charging options along the way. I get nervous when the battery is low and there is no charging options anywhere near. That day the temperature was down to 20 degrees and I didn't want to be stuck in the middle of nowhere with no heat in the car. What happens if you run out of battery along the side of the road? Does roadside assistance send some kind of charging vehicle to give you enough battery to get to a charging station? Or do they have to tow the car?
The best course of action is to 1) drive slower ;it really helps) & 2) find any plug if it gets real bad.

Yes, I’m most cases it will be a tow.
 

Transformer

Do the math. Save the world. — Mark Leon
Dec 26, 2019
712
557
Silicon Valley
That day the temperature was down to 20 degrees and I didn't want to be stuck in the middle of nowhere with no heat in the car. What happens if you run out of battery along the side of the road? Does roadside assistance send some kind of charging vehicle to give you enough battery to get to a charging station? Or do they have to tow the car?
Good questions. I'd like to know, too.

The 12V battery will power the A/C for at least 3 hours in 100°F weather after the high voltage fuse blows (speaking from experience). Presumably it'll also power the heater or heat pump. Assuming the HV battery can't recharge the 12V battery after the HV fuse blows, the situation is like running down the HV battery.

P.S. If you need a GrandWazoo avatar image, Wikipedia has one: The_Grand_Wazoo.jpg
 
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Supcom

Active Member
Oct 3, 2021
1,424
2,415
Texas
Interesting, I just tried planning my trip from Ottawa in ABRP and it also offered the same route the Tesla map took me on as the first choice. It did provide two alternate routes, one of which was the Rt 81 trip I show above. Part of the reason I like that route better is that there are more charging options along the way. I get nervous when the battery is low and there is no charging options anywhere near. That day the temperature was down to 20 degrees and I didn't want to be stuck in the middle of nowhere with no heat in the car. What happens if you run out of battery along the side of the road? Does roadside assistance send some kind of charging vehicle to give you enough battery to get to a charging station? Or do they have to tow the car?
If you run out of battery power, your car will almost certainly need to be taken to a charger on a flat bed tow truck. Keep in mind that, in the event this occurs, you will likely be close to the intended charger, so you may not, strictly speaking, be in the middle of nowhere.

If you do find yourself at risk of running out of energy (remember, 10% should give you about 30 miles in a M3) try slowing down to reduce your consumption. I had this situation last year making a long stretch between Stillwater, OK and the Denison, TX supercharger. The car did not take into account a stiff headwind that day. Seeing the estimated SOC at the charger drop to around 5% early in the drive was more than a little worrying. As the route was on low traffic state highways, I simply slowed down to around 60 mph and arrived at the charger with about 15% SOC.
 

KArnold

Active Member
May 21, 2017
1,224
1,414
Columbus OH
I generally plan on arriving at the next SC ideally around 10% - haven't been stranded in 65k miles.

Took a trip from Ohio to Montana a couple years ago. Much less SC's to choose from in the SD, Wyoming, Montana areas (thank God for Wall Drug SD!). And it can get very windy. I had two experiences where my consumption was significantly higher than planned. One time on I-90 coming into Billings it was very windy. My 10% buffer dropped to an estimated 5% only about halfway through that leg - I was concerned. I slowed to about 60 MPH (I believe the speed limit was 80) and that seemed to maintain the current estimate so it didn't get worse but I'm still at a nerve-wracking 5% estimate. There are very few exits with gas stations in this part of the country, let alone a L2 charger somewhere. Very stressful. But a truck carrying a very large boat passed me doing about 75 MPH. I set the follow distances to 2 and fell in behind him. The estimate almost immediately began to improve. I followed that guy all the way to Montana, arriving at the SC with a whopping 12%.

If desperate, drafting a large vehicle can make a large difference. As will going slower obviously but drafting is the best option IMHO. Of course, you also are increasing the chance of a stone chip. But desperate times require desperate measures.

Today, I still use 10% as my target - if that estimate erodes along the way for any reason too low, I can adjust. But in the above states anyway, I'll now increase it to 20% when I return. Bottom line - consider your plan "B" options on each long leg, most often an enroute decision.

Then again, my wife fills her gas tank when it reaches half. 🤷 To reach their own.
 
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