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Fair value for 90D private sale?

Discussion in 'Model S: Ordering, Production, Delivery' started by fieldalias, Jul 27, 2016.

  1. fieldalias

    fieldalias Member

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    I'm thinking of selling my 90D private party, and then upgrading to an X.
    Here are the stats:

    90D, blue metallic
    + Autopilot
    + Lighting Package
    + Winter Package
    + Carbon Fiber Interior
    + Next Gen Seats

    The car has about $7k of professional detailing (clear bra (xpel) and tint (photosync) all around.

    6500 miles and 11 months old. Basically not a scratch on it. Mint.

    Purchase price was $101,700 .

    Thoughts?
     
  2. DougH

    DougH Active Member

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    People will not pay for the detailing and tint so you cannot add that to the value.

    That's my only 2 cents.
     
  3. Hazelwood

    Hazelwood Member

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    I just went through this new vs used excersise when I decided to purchase new. I wouldn't pay more than $80k at most, though that's just me personally. My logic is, I'd take $10k off for rebates and then figured anything less than $10k savings for it being used I'd just go new. I found many a used car, but most wanted what might be a good price if not for the rebate. My $.02.
     
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  4. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

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    I'd hold out for a buyer that appreciates the detailing that he won't have to do.

    Further, I've rejected the tax rebate discount theory since day 1. Not everyone qualifies for it and my tax position is nobody's business unless and until I run for public orifice. A car sold the day after the tax credit expires is not worth $7,500 more than the car sold the day before, and vice versa.

    In the end, the market will set the price. Want to magically make the car worth less? Sell it at auction or trade it in. Want to make it worth more? Hold out for someone who decorates their home in metallic blue and wears metallic blue suits.

    To the point, check regionally to see what similar cars have sold for. Advertise where there are fewer of what you have. And on and on.

    Or just stick an ad in the local paper, price it as high as the CPO variant, and then back off $5K and see what happens from there. Rinse and repeat and voila - one day it will sell.
     
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  5. CapeOne

    CapeOne Member

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    Upper $70Ks would probably be a good place to start as far as asking price given that new cars with similar or more equipment (not counting the "professional detailing") are being offered for as little as $83K* after federal tax credit and referral money.

    *New 2016 MS 90D with your equipment plus pano roof and smart air suspension: Model S 90D 130061 | Tesla
     
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  6. Boourns

    Boourns Member

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    And even then apparently not. [/threadjack]
     
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  7. CapeOne

    CapeOne Member

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    Not everyone qualifies for things like conquest or loyalty rebates from other manufacturers either but they do have an impact on resale values. I think most people buying Teslas do qualify for all or at least a good portion of the $7,500 federal tax credit (not to mention possible state credits) and will factor that in when comparing new prices versus similar CPO/used.
     
  8. jaguar36

    jaguar36 Member

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    Your tax position is only part of the issue, the issue is the tax position of the buyer, and of other sellers of similar cars. If the buyer could receive the credit, then thats going to factor into his decision when comparing new vs used. In addition if there are other sellers with similar cars who were able to take the tax credit, then they will be pricing their cars lower.
     
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  9. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

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    New versus used, sure. But not used versus used. If sellers choose to discount their asset because they got a rebate, that's their choice. Has nothing to do with the value of the car.
     
  10. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

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    Sure, but new versus used is different than used versus used.

    And that doesn't even take into account the people that "just won't have a used car" or "don't want a used car with too many miles" - positions I would suggest will be of less and less validity as Tesla reliability improves. Already, until recently you couldn't tell new from used from 20 feet away (unless you knew to look for a couple of things), and already Tesla has made a car with so many fewer moving parts that I would argue mileage already matters a LOT less. Factor out the one commonality of suspension parts and pieces and the chasm only widens.
     
  11. CapeOne

    CapeOne Member

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    I was simply commenting that new selling prices including any discounts, referral money, tax credits, etc. impact used values and this is regardless of whether or not a particular owner (private seller) got any or all of the available discounts, referral money, tax credits, etc. If no federal tax credit existed, the OP selling his 11 month old MS could ask/get thousands more since new ones would be $7,500 more. Part of the initial 'depreciation' on used Teslas and other EVs is that federal tax credit.
     

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