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Faster processors and networking

Discussion in 'Model S: User Interface' started by anticitizen13.7, Aug 17, 2013.

  1. anticitizen13.7

    anticitizen13.7 Enemy of the Status Quo

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    #1 anticitizen13.7, Aug 17, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2013
    I remember reading that the Model S user interfaces are powered by an nVidia Tegra 3 (Center display), and an nVidia Tegra 2 (Driver's instrument display).

    Are people finding the computer systems fast and responsive enough?

    I wonder what Tesla has planned for future cars, because ARM processors continue to evolve rapidly in terms of computing power, configuration, and energy efficiency.

    Also, I wonder when LTE will become available.

    Is there a networking module that can be easily replaced?

    Edit: Ugh, I posted this in the wrong subforum. Can I get it moved to User Interface?
     
  2. islandbayy

    islandbayy Active Member

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    Most of it is responsive enough. However, the Google Maps, and Web browsing is insanely slow if their are any real graphics or large pictures what so ever. Large in terms of Megabytes, not large in terms of zoomed. The Google maps is very laggy when your trying to pan, zoom etc... and I'm not talking about the 3g data lag, once the maps loaded. The Nvidia seems to do fine for everything accept graphics, imagine that... (This is my opinion, I wish it did better, as I would love to get YouTube or Netflix on it in the future).
     
  3. deonb

    deonb Active Member

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    It's a bit of a myth that ARM processors are inherently more efficient than Intel processors. Tesla would have actually been better suited with an Atom right now. E.g.
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6529/busting-the-x86-power-myth-indepth-clover-trail-power-analysis

    But anyway, no the browser is definitely not responsive enough to be terribly useful, from a 3-fold perspective. Slow processor, slow network, slow software.

    Even though the display is bigger, because of the slow response times, my wife and I generally end up falling back to our phones to look things up, rather than using the car's browser. It's fine for caching a few sites to always pull up, like TSLA stock quote (and AXPW for laughs), Recargo/Plugshare, Valet instructions, but not for general browsing.

    The 17" GPS is also not very responsive, but that primarily seems to be due to slow network, and Tesla is addressing that with cached tiles, presumably in 5.0.

    The controls for the car are great and responsive though. To the point where you don't miss manual controls. It seems like everything Tesla did completely in-house it's great, and everything where they had to communicate with a 3rd party to make work, not so much. This is actually not unlike the rest of Tesla. You can tell a lot of a company's internal politics by looking at the software it produces.

    If I had any kind of graphics skills, I would update the famous org charts (below) to add Tesla, with of course a haloed deity in the middle and everyone else kneeling before him, but inside a bubble with a long line of people on the outside trying desperately to get inside.

    2011_06_27_organizational_charts.png
     
  4. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    In 5.0, you will see that map rotation as you turn (if you use 'car up' mode) is just a bit laggy - unless you're an OCD, instant gratification freak, you'll find it works sufficiently well. Oh, who am I kidding, we'll have people screaming.
     
  5. NigelM

    NigelM Recovering Member

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    Presto!
     
  6. fiksegts

    fiksegts Active Member

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    as soon as I get my car at version 5.0, I'll test out my LTE hotspot in the car, probably no need to have integrated LTE if it works well on the hotspot...





     
  7. anticitizen13.7

    anticitizen13.7 Enemy of the Status Quo

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    I think that the issue with Intel Atom is in large part due to software support. I remember last year there was a small firestorm when Intel announced that the Clover Trail platform would support Windows tablets, but not Linux, and then Intel backtracked somewhat to say they would support Linux at a future date.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-atom-clover-trail-linux,17659.html

    Clover Trail apparently has a lot of great power saving features, but the software running on it needs to be able to take advantage of these features. Given that Model S runs a form of Linux, I don't think that Atom would be viable right now. The Atom platforms that were available when the Model S was under development certainly were not nearly as good as the current platforms.

    I don't know how easy it would be to port the Model S software from ARM to Intel, but I have a feeling that Tesla would not want to spend the engineering resources to do this unless there were massive benefits.
     

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