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First Road Trip ABRP or Tesla Nav

I generally use both.. but trust ABRP's prediction more. The longer the trip, the more I depend on ABRP. I find that ABRP gives me the fastest travel instructions. Essentially ABRP tells me to stop to charge more often, but for significantly shorter durations. For example, on a 300-mile trip I commonly take to visit my Dad, Tesla's in-car navigation will tell me to stop once to charge for 40mins on the way back. Meanwhile, ABRP will tell me to stop twice: once for 9mins and a second time for 6mins.. saving me almost 25mins off my total travel time.

Tesla in-car nav is fairly accurate. And should be even more so now that it accounts for weather, elevation, speed, etc.. all things ABRP already does. But it still plays it a little too safe for me. ABRP also lets you customize variables. I generally have mine set to arrive a Supercharger with 5% or more battery life.. while Tesla's system prefers I arrive with 20% or more battery life. ABRP likes to keep the battery range between 10-65% when driving long distance as the battery charges quickest when its SOC is lowest.
 
Thank you all for the valuable info!!
I think I’m going to use the Tesla nav and have ABRP open on my phone and Google maps on my wife’s phone.
You can also just load ABRP in the Tesla Browser for quick reference :). I agree with some earlier posts that you should use ABRP to plan your trip but then use the built in navigation day to day with waypoints.

Just always put in your next waypoint after your destination so the car knows it will need to make it to another stop. I just did a 4,000 mile road trip and I just put in the waypoints for the day, the sleeping location, and the next day's first stop. Worked perfectly!
 
You can also just load ABRP in the Tesla Browser for quick reference :). I agree with some earlier posts that you should use ABRP to plan your trip but then use the built in navigation day to day with waypoints.

Just always put in your next waypoint after your destination so the car knows it will need to make it to another stop. I just did a 4,000 mile road trip and I just put in the waypoints for the day, the sleeping location, and the next day's first stop. Worked perfectly!
Thank you
 
It will only preheat the battery if it is needed, but, let the car decide, because it knows what’s best in this situation. Don’t overthink it.
Yep -- on my last trip, after my first stop, it only preheated maybe 1-2 minutes before arriving at the supercharger (I had plenty of charge left, so it wasn't trying to conserve). It was a warm day, and I think my battery was probably warm from the previous supercharging.

If you don't preheat before heading in by not putting the supercharger as a destination, you can prevent it from using any energy to preheat your battery. However, I'm not sure if you actually save any money -- I've noticed that if I don't preheat ahead of time, I see the little heating icon as I'm charging, so depending on how Tesla charges you for the energy used, you might just use about the same amount of energy heating the battery either way.
 
ABRP has a few nice things that let you tailor your trip to your own style. For example, you can adjust the following route options (I'm not listing them all - just a few interesting ones):
  • Choose between longer, fewer stops and shorter, more frequent stops
  • "Force" waypoints (for example, when there are multiple superchargers in relative proximity along the route or set of alternate routes, but only one is a v3, you can make sure you navigate to the v3)
  • Adjust departure SoC%, minimum SC arrival SoC%, maximum SoC% limit when charging, minimum arrival SoC% (some people love to push the limits of the battery range, some people enjoy a more conservative approach, avoiding low SoC% situations)
Also: ABRP tells you exactly how to charge (e.g. "arrive at 25%, charge to 60%"). Not saying ABRP will always be exactly right, but at least you get a ballpark idea of what its plan is, when thinking about margin of error. On the Tesla Nav system, much less info is provided: You arrive at the supercharger, and it tells you to "charge for 15 minutes" - not nearly as helpful.

I combine ABRP and Tesla Nav for any non-trivial trip. I use ABRP for deciding which chargers to visit (and for how much to charge before departing for next stop), and Tesla Nav for actual map navigation (for preconditioning).
 

TSOG

New Member
Jul 5, 2022
2
0
Georgia
Hey, I just finished a 1,400 mile trip yesterday using the latest Tesla Update. I had the map change my supercharger station on me three times. Once was fine but the other time the car really pushed it. I arrived to the so called less busy station with %7. When the map rerouted to the less busy and further station I did not see a way to cancel this. The third time I noticed the map changing once again to a further station I looked at the estimated remaning charge, this was 10% and decided to chancle the route and manually input the original closer station. It never rerouted me after that.

I with there was a way to tell the map not to reroute from a busy station if it means the call would fall into let's say sub 15% state of charge. Or at the very least an easy way to cancel the change.

That was my experience with the Tesla maps. Next time I think I'll give APRP a shot, I just with the UI was a bit cleaner, an on my phone it really bugs out a lot.
 
Hey, I just finished a 1,400 mile trip yesterday using the latest Tesla Update. I had the map change my supercharger station on me three times. Once was fine but the other time the car really pushed it. I arrived to the so called less busy station with %7. When the map rerouted to the less busy and further station I did not see a way to cancel this. The third time I noticed the map changing once again to a further station I looked at the estimated remaning charge, this was 10% and decided to chancle the route and manually input the original closer station. It never rerouted me after that.

I with there was a way to tell the map not to reroute from a busy station if it means the call would fall into let's say sub 15% state of charge. Or at the very least an easy way to cancel the change.

That was my experience with the Tesla maps. Next time I think I'll give APRP a shot, I just with the UI was a bit cleaner, an on my phone it really bugs out a lot.
In my limited experience doing road trips I had a similar experience. That’s one of the flaws of the Tesla Nav system - it has pretty limited flexibility. In my case I knew the route and I simply ignored Tesla’s route and eventually it re-routed me to the busier supercharger. You can also trick it into doing so by setting. A waypoint close to the SC you want.

This is another example of why it would be nice to had CarPlay; you can use the ABRP app on your phone to plan your app and it’s all right there when you connect your phone. No hacks necessary.
 
I use both. ABRP is used for pre trip planning, when I customize all stops, set arrival SOC, whether I will charge up at each stop etc. Tesla doesn't let you customize arrival SOC. It seems to me as low as 8% is okay if can reach without charging, but if it adds SC, then it will set to somewhere 15-20% arrival SOC.
I haven't linked ABRP to my Tesla yet, the interface is quite laggy for real time navigation, although it updates SC available stalls much better than Tesla. After a charge, I need to update ABRP current SOC, which is very hard to do by clicking the battery +/- icons. Sometimes I just cancel the trip and restart. I imagine this won't be an issue once I link it to the car. ABRP oddly stops showing SC info when it gets close and starts showing turn by turn information.
 
I've done a couple of very long roadtrips now. I've found ABRP to be an invaluable tool, but I don't really use it in realtime. It's a great planning tool when you're first planning your trip ahead of time. Get an idea of "real" drive times, planning out where you might need overnight stays along your route and which are near what chargers, etc.

It does have some advantages over the realtime in-car charging + navigation. Particularly useful is the ability to set comfort limits on your battery level, like "I don't ever want to *plan* to arrive at a supercharger with less than 12%", or "When I get to my final destination, I need to be at 65%, because I'm staying there for 3 days and there's no close fast charging" (Tesla's onboard stuff will totally let you arrive there at 10% with no way home). Also, when you're carrying significant passengers and cargo, you can put that in as additional weight and ABRP will adjust your wh/mi estimates for it (my last trip, 3 passengers, trunk loaded to the brim including the under-part, and a full frunk, I ended up estimating into ABRP an additional 1200 lbs, which is significant!).

During the trip itself, I use Tesla's in-car nav and charging selections for the most part. In the case of a multi-day drive, I generally set the in-car ultimate destination as the final stop for that day. However, I don't always do what Tesla tells me to do, either. If I know from ABRP research that Tesla has chosen an SC option that will cost me more time than ABRP's choice, I may manually set an immediate next destination to the ABRP-chosen SC and then continue my real route once I get there. Sometimes I even fire up ABRP while I'm waiting at an SC just to re-check things and re-evaluate my next steps. Sometimes that means I may want to add more or less juice to the car at this charging stop than what Tesla recommends "to continue your trip". It takes some time to develop a feel for using ABRP + Tesla in concert with each other like this, but it works out pretty well!

I also sometimes compare Google Maps routes on my phone as well, for the next short segment of the drive. Sometimes gmaps understands traffic conditions and routing decisions better than anything else. Even though it's not doing any charging planning, it can still be a useful datapoint for your evaluation.

I will say that while Tesla's in-car nav and charging usually work pretty well in the short view (~6-8h or shorter drive segments), on my most recent roadtrip I've seen it make some colossally silly mistakes as well.

The worst one I saw on my way home where Tesla's routing managed to make a horrible "optimization": On our last leg home, the car needed one final SC charging stop before reaching my house on the "normal" straight highway path home. I only needed about +10% at this final SC to make it, which is just how the math goes sometimes. But the Tesla route planner, in its infinite wisdom, decided to send me on a country roads detour to skip the SC instead! Basically because the country roads were lower speed limits, it "saved" the extra 10% of battery use and avoided that one last SC stop on the way home altogether, but at the cost of an additional 2 hours of drive time over the straight route! Needless to say, I just set my destination to the straight-path supercharger on my own. Always double-check that Tesla's nav decisions really make sense!
 
The worst one I saw on my way home where Tesla's routing managed to make a horrible "optimization": On our last leg home, the car needed one final SC charging stop before reaching my house on the "normal" straight highway path home. I only needed about +10% at this final SC to make it, which is just how the math goes sometimes. But the Tesla route planner, in its infinite wisdom, decided to send me on a country roads detour to skip the SC instead! Basically because the country roads were lower speed limits, it "saved" the extra 10% of battery use and avoided that one last SC stop on the way home altogether, but at the cost of an additional 2 hours of drive time over the straight route! Needless to say, I just set my destination to the straight-path supercharger on my own. Always double-check that Tesla's nav decisions really make sense!
I'm not sure the conclusion that Tesla did it to save energy is correct.
On my recent trip, Tesla suggested a detour for apparently no reason, my guess is it thinks there's traffic on the freeway.
 

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avs007

Active Member
May 14, 2021
1,213
1,125
PacNW
I'm not sure the conclusion that Tesla did it to save energy is correct.
On my recent trip, Tesla suggested a detour for apparently no reason, my guess is it thinks there's traffic on the freeway.
On my way back from California, Tesla tried to route me on a side/mountain pass road, instead of the main interstate when going thru the Siskyous... I thought Tesla Nav was being stupid, so I ignored it.... Lo and behold, it was becuase there was construction on the 5, all lanes but one were closed... And there were rubber neckers, becuase on the other side of the freeway, a C8 corvette broke down just short of the summit, and there were like 6 guys trying to push it up past the summit, becuase it was only one lane, with a cement barrier on each side, making it so it was completely blocking the freeway.... I wish I could've saved it on TeslaCam, but the wife accidentally bumped the thumbdrive in the glovebox that morning, so I couldn't save the clip.... It was quite hilarious, watching the guys trying to push it up a 6% incline or whatever it was.. They were all smiles and laughing, while there was a line of cars/trucks behind them backed up for several miles.
 
I use ABRP for planning and usually rely on the Tesla nav system while actually on the road.

I have a problem with setting the ABRP to more stops and shorter charges. Sure, we all know that the battery charges much faster all a low SOC, so leaving a charger with 60-70% could make some sense BUT, figuring in the 5 minutes to get off the highway to plug in and charge, charging for maybe 10 minutes and 5 min more to unplug and get back on the highway adds up. And, charging for only 10 minutes doesn't give much time to get to a bathroom or get coffee/food. If I can make a 300-mile trip with only 1 30-minute charge I find that more relaxing and efficient than stopping twice for 2-10 minutes charges. I've done maybe 75K miles of road trips over 7 years. I guess Tesla drivers will decide what charging scenario works best for them.
 

Nosken

Active Member
Jan 15, 2015
1,148
1,149
Lincoln, CA
I use ABRP for planning and usually rely on the Tesla nav system while actually on the road.

I have a problem with setting the ABRP to more stops and shorter charges. Sure, we all know that the battery charges much faster all a low SOC, so leaving a charger with 60-70% could make some sense BUT, figuring in the 5 minutes to get off the highway to plug in and charge, charging for maybe 10 minutes and 5 min more to unplug and get back on the highway adds up. And, charging for only 10 minutes doesn't give much time to get to a bathroom or get coffee/food. If I can make a 300-mile trip with only 1 30-minute charge I find that more relaxing and efficient than stopping twice for 2-10 minutes charges. I've done maybe 75K miles of road trips over 7 years. I guess Tesla drivers will decide what charging scenario works best for them.
In ABRP settings, Battery, you can adjust the charge overhead time.
"Charging overhead
Overhead time at every charge stop. A higher value here will lead to fewer but longer charge stops.

Charger arrival SoC needs to have a lower percentage than the Departure SoC otherwise the plan will fail."
 
  • Informative
Reactions: Johnny Vector
I'm not sure the conclusion that Tesla did it to save energy is correct.
On my recent trip, Tesla suggested a detour for apparently no reason, my guess is it thinks there's traffic on the freeway.

Who knows really. The reason I suspect it was optimizing to avoid the charging stop, though: from Tesla nav, if I manually added an extra waypoint very close to the "skipped" SC on the straight path, it would then choose the straight path and use the charger, and show the drastically-shorter ETA to the final destination (home). So I don't think that it thought there was a major slowdown/blockage on the highway itself.

Also, in my quoted post I was rounding things off a bit in a fit of hyperbole, perhaps. The actual tradeoff was probably numerically closer to ~100 minutes of extra total trip time vs the extra charge stop probably being more like 12-13 minutes (at a V3, at fairly low battery level to get lots of charge quickly). There was probably also some variation in the final SoC arriving at home via the two paths, but they were both pretty low (but acceptable to me).

I can see how some simplistic optimizer metrics might have thought this was a better plan, but I can't imagine this particular corner case being acceptable to a human finishing a long road trip :)
 

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