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first thing to do after tire swap?

I am gonna swap out my tires next week. took your advices on here and got the michelin sports 4 S's. looking forward to seeing how they compare to the OEM's and will let you all know

my question is about configuration. i saw there was a new update which may have changed it

any instructions/tips on what i should do after i pick up my tesla from the local tire shop to make things go smooth? not taking it into tesla the service blows there, just a local tire shop that i trust

when i get the car before i drive home what do you recommend I push on the screen to configure properly and should i just drive slow and steady or should i do some fast accelerating ? . read some stuff that if you do it wrong it can cause problems with regen and other things so need your wisdom!
 
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There's this but I forgot to and haven't had any issues.
 

Perscitus

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Jan 29, 2019
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Make sure the shop inflates them your preference and double check their work, inflate/deflate each tire to equalize and match what you want (cold).

Then drive around at/around 20mph for a bit so that all four TPMS sensors start registering and proceed to reset the TPMS sensors default/nominal cold tire pressure to set your liking.

So as above post:

a. set your tire type (2022.20.x and above)
b. set/reset your wheel type (let the MCU soft reset
c. check and adjust your cold tire pressure as you see fit
d. drive around slowly with tires cold so all TPMS register, pull over and reset TPMS to set nee nominal cold pressure and let the car relearn TPMS location (if wheels/tires were rotated when changed)
e. drive at least 1K miles to start comparing efficency and nvh of old tires vs new
 

tm1v2

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Oct 18, 2021
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Inflation pressure is key, it can make a real difference in grip and feel. Some tire shops like to overinflate Model 3 tires to 45psi cold, which is terrible for anything besides efficiency. I'd start with 39-40psi cold and adjust to taste from there.

(I haven't used the PS4S, so my starting tire pressure suggestion is generic, not specific to that tire.)
 

tm1v2

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Oct 18, 2021
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Also remember that brand new tires have a layer of grease on them. They will be very slippery if you try pushing them hard right away. That should wear off within a few hundred miles or less.

If you just drive normally/casually you'll not even notice new tire slipperiness. If you're thinking about approaching their limits on some empty ramps though, wait until you've worn past that initial greasiness. Or be prepared to catch any oversteer. ;)
 
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Inflation pressure is key, it can make a real difference in grip and feel. Some tire shops like to overinflate Model 3 tires to 45psi cold, which is terrible for anything besides efficiency. I'd start with 39-40psi cold and adjust to taste from there.

(I haven't used the PS4S, so my starting tire pressure suggestion is generic, not specific to that tire.)
thats interesting because when my psi gets below 40 i get an alert to put more air in

you are saying to ignore the 45psi recommendation?
 

tm1v2

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Oct 18, 2021
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thats interesting because when my psi gets below 40 i get an alert to put more air in

you are saying to ignore the 45psi recommendation?
45psi cold feels too firm and harms grip, vs 40 or even 42 psi cold. Once warmed up I usually see 3-5 psi higher than cold reading.

My door sticker says 42 psi cold btw. I don't even know where the 45 psi cold number comes from, but tire shops around me seem to think it's the spec for Teslas (despite door sticker saying otherwise).

I've seen 38-39 psi reported by TPMS without any warning.

When your car has issued an alert for below 40psi, was that with all tires at similar pressure, or was one tire much lower and the rest were 45+? If the latter that seems expected...it should warn about a large pressure difference, regardless of absolute numbers.
 
I drive my MY between 38~39 psi for comfort. I am not too concerned about mileage as the MY is used mainly for city commute. In one of Elon's tweets he had indicated that for M3 it was okay to go down to 38 psi to reduce the bouncy ride and get some level of comfort. I have never received any warning from TPMS
 
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drive around slowly with tires cold so all TPMS register, pull over and reset TPMS to set nee nominal cold pressure and let the car relearn TPMS location (if wheels/tires were rotated when changed)
This is not needed, nor the way a Tesla works. When you change tire config, it resets TPMS. It will learn position the next time you roll out. Tesla TPMS also doesn't "learn" the nominal cold pressure.
Just do the wheel swap in the UI and move on with your life.
 
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No heavy acceleration for the first day or so. You can spin the rim inside of the tire and screw up the balancing.
I have never once heard of this from anyone that actually races cars. It's super common to mount a set of very sticky tires and send it right away.
Braking is harder on the wheel-rim interface than acceleration anyway. A M3P can only do .9G acceleration but can do 1.2-1.3G on a set of MP4S'. So if this is an actual concern, you should be telling people "no heavy braking" not "no heavy accel".
You do have to be careful for the first mile or so due to mold release.
 
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I've seen 38-39 psi reported by TPMS without any warning.
In one of Elon's tweets he had indicated that for M3 it was okay to go down to 38 psi to reduce the bouncy ride and get some level of comfort. I have never received any warning from TPMS
The legal threshold for TPMS is 25%- so at a 42 PSI door sticker, it won't come on until 32 PSI.

45psi cold feels too firm and harms grip, vs 40 or even 42 psi cold. Once warmed up I usually see 3-5 psi higher than cold reading.
It's not clear cut that on MP4S's that higher pressure harms grip. When I run them on high grip surfaces, I have to run about 50 PSI to prevent roll over onto the shoulder, and I set my best times doing so.

I run 42 PSI cold on the street, just like the door jamb sticker says to, given MP4S' are the stock tire for the car. Unless you really know what you are doing, moving away from this trades off many things that you may not be aware of.
 

tm1v2

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Oct 18, 2021
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The legal threshold for TPMS is 25%- so at a 42 PSI door sticker, it won't come on until 32 PSI.


It's not clear cut that on MP4S's that higher pressure harms grip. When I run them on high grip surfaces, I have to run about 50 PSI to prevent roll over onto the shoulder, and I set my best times doing so.

I run 42 PSI cold on the street, just like the door jamb sticker says to, given MP4S' are the stock tire for the car. Unless you really know what you are doing, moving away from this trades off many things that you may not be aware of.
300+ TW Michelins tend to have soft sidewalls as performance tires go, in my experience. So that actually makes sense to me for the PS4S, and I defer to @gearchruncher's recommendation as a starting point for those tires.

(That is why I put the disclaimer about my pressure recommendation being generic and not specific to any one tire! :))

No need for 50 psi hot to prevent excessive sidewall roll on my Potenza Sports. At that pressure they feel overly stiff and don't grip or ride as well vs 43-45 psi. Nothing unusual or unexpected about different tires working best at different pressures though!
 

Perscitus

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Jan 29, 2019
1,214
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New York
This is not needed, nor the way a Tesla works. When you change tire config, it resets TPMS. It will learn position the next time you roll out. Tesla TPMS also doesn't "learn" the nominal cold pressure.
Just do the wheel swap in the UI and move on with your life.
I beg to disagree. You can use the service menu to 'force' cold tire pressures nominals to whatever you want and to shift the min/max TPMS alerts to a different range hence the 'learn'.

Lets assume the default is 42psi as normal cold tire pressure. There will be some low and high psi that trigger TPMS alerts (maybe below 34psi and above 50psi).

If you inflate your tires to 45psi cold and prefer that as your baseline pressure, using the service menu will allow you to move that 34-42-50 psi range and triggers up to 37-45-52 psi respectively.

With 2022.20.x software it also seems Tesla not only added the tire type toggle, but now the TPMS reset also finally resets the location of where each sensor is with respect to the tire location around the car (in the event of a tire rotation). Previously this was no the case and after rotating the tires, the GUI continued to show stale locations (causing people to inflate/deflate the wrong tire).
 
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I beg to disagree. You can use the service menu to 'force' cold tire pressures nominals to whatever you want and to shift the min/max TPMS alerts to a different range hence the 'learn'.
I can find no evidence of this in the Model 3 manual. It makes no mention that a TPMS reset "learns" the current tire pressure as normal.
What it does say is:

Changing your vehicle's wheel configuration can impact range estimates, tire pressure warning levels, and vehicle visualization.
If your Model 3 is equipped with aftermarket tires that differ in size from those printed on the Tire and Loadingand Loading Information Label (see Vehicle Loading), it is the driver's responsibility to determine the correct tire pressure.
After replacing one or more wheels (but not after replacing a tire), the TPMS sensors are relearned to ensure tire pressure warnings are accurate. TPMS sensors reset automatically within 10 minutes of driving over 15 mph (25 km/h).

Nowhere does it tell you to reset TPMS after correctly setting pressures, and in fact it tells you that if you need a different pressure, it's up to you to track it. Where have you seen that it "learns"?
 
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