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First thoughts on my Model 3 vs. my Model S

RBowen

Member
Jun 14, 2016
109
308
San Diego
Please note that all of the comments below are my subjective opinion based on the first several hundred miles of ownership. My 2018 Model 3 VIN is 39xx. I’m located in San Diego. My other cars are a 2016 refreshed Model S 75D with AP1 and a 2016 Volt. I’m on the list for a second Model 3. The Volt and the Model S will go.

Overall first reaction: this is the best car I’ve ever owned including Tesla Model S (2), BMW 3-series (3), Audi, Porsche (3), Jaguar E-type (3), Lexus, Volt, Fiat 500E, Mini Cooper S, Miata, etc. Overall, as others have said, it feels like living in the future – and that future is good!

Fit and Finish: Generally good and better than the two Model S’s I’ve owned. The biggest flaw I’ve noticed is that the hood is not quite flush with the fenders about half-way up toward the windshield; it is flush at the front of the car and back toward the windshield. (For perspective, my 2016 S had loose weather stripping in multiple places, a loose door panel, etc. My 2013 S has some poor panel alignments and a few rattles.)

Handling: more taut, more nimble, and way more fun than my model S 75D. More like an older 3 series BMW with sport suspension. It is responsive without being ‘fidgety’ on the freeway like my mini cooper S or my miata.

Ride: firm but rarely harsh. Again, more like a sports sedan with a sport suspension. Lowering the air pressure from 49 psi (as delivered) to 45 psi (recommended on the driver’s door pillar) did not make a noticeable difference. Have not tried anything lower. If you want a more comfortable ride, you may need an S with air suspension.

Performance: Feels quick and about the same as my S 75D. After several years of driving electric cars, I still appreciate the fun of instant torque. See above for handling.

Interior: airy, minimalistic, comfortable and mostly more functional. Feels almost as spacious as my S with panoramic sunroof. The 3 is more functional given placement of cup holders, coat hooks, usb ports, door storage, lighted vanity mirrors, etc. I really like the ability to control the airflow. The cloth (non-Alcantra) headliner seems nice enough, but I much prefer the black Alcantra material I have in my S; this will likely appear in a future year’s upgrade package. One negative is the piano black finish on the console. It catches dust and fingerprints and will scratch easily. (I will be wrapping mine when I figure out what finish to choose.) Tesla should switch console materials asap.

Exterior J-shaped door handles are cool looking but awkward. For smooth one-hand operation, you have to approach the handle from the correct side using the correct hand. (I cannot believe I am writing this. It reminds me of Apple telling users they were holding their iPhone incorrectly!) For the Driver’s side, use your left hand standing to the rear side of the handle. Push with your thumb and grab the handle that extends out with your fingers. For the Passenger side, use your right thumb and fingers standing to the rear side of the handle. You will get used to it, but your new passengers will not. It will make them feel stupid, which is not good.

Interior push-button door release is elegant, but your passengers are more likely to use the manual release, which does not automatically lower the window. It will make you and your passenger feel stupid when you tell them how to open the door correctly. Again – cool but not good.

Audio: To my untrained ear, the sound system in the Model 3 is as good or better than the premium system in my S 75D.

Noise: the drive train much quieter than my S 75D, as there is no continuous varying motor whine that Tesla service told me was “normal.” At speed, the interior feels about as quiet as my S, which is okay but far from state-of-the-art. In my opinion, there is still too much road and wind noise. Tesla should consider offering a “quiet” package results in the quietest interior in the industry. Starting with a quiet drive train is a huge competitive advantage that Tesla does not completely take advantage of.

Controls and interface: even knowing how an S operates, there is a significant learning curve. Some (perhaps many) interface issues can be improved with software. My current top requests include:
  • Control AP speed from the steering wheel. I use the stalk on my S frequently to adjust the AP speed.
  • Control wipers from the steering wheel.
  • Option to move navigation’s list of distances and turns to left hand side of navigation display (from the current far right-hand side)
  • Improve quality of view from backup camera (to make it similar to model S).
  • Add option to see energy graphs (similar to model S software)
AP 2.5 vs AP 1. Going straight in your lane on a freeway, there may be a bit less ‘squirming.’ On a modestly tight curve, Model 3 AP 2.5 feels scary like it might cross the center line. Subjectively, I’ve had to intervene far more often than with AP1 in my S 75D. In lanes that vary in width, the car seeks the center of the lane, which can result in a ‘weird’ track that is not what one would do driving manually. Using the turn signal to move to an adjacent lane causes a far more abrupt move than under AP1. Overall, sadly, it feels like AP2.5 on Model 3 still has not caught up with AP1 on Model S. Arguably, AP in its current state is most useful in stop and go rush traffic. Given Tesla’s obvious head start toward autonomous driving and all of the data that Tesla has collected, why has Tesla’s AP not improved at a faster rate?

Lane departure warning is totally irritating on winding roads, as it will not allow you to cross the apex of a turn without getting the vibrating lane departure warning. I had to turn it off. (Note that this may be no different than on the S, but it was more noticeable to me.) I’d like an option to have lane departure warning active when on freeways and off otherwise.

Phone as a key. With one potentially big exception, it has worked well for me. Note that I turned off “unlock as you walk up” because you will continually be unlocking your model 3 if you work in your garage. If your garage is close to your house, it may continually unlock the car as you walk around inside with your phone. With “auto-lock as you walk up” turned off, you unlock by touching a door handle or by opening the exterior trunk release button. What you cannot do is open the front trunk (the frunk) without the huge hassle of getting out your phone, finding the Tesla app, waiting for it to find your car, clicking on controls, and finally clicking on open frunk. Those that want to actively use their frunk need to lobby Tesla to make an optional fob.

Delivery process. (Warning: this is even more anecdotal than the discussion about the car.) Our delivery specialist was pleasant enough and patient, but it was not a high-end experience:
  • the car was not properly prepared. It had to been sent back to buff out fine scratches on the hood. They left polishing compound around the door handles and between some panels. The windshield still has something on it that needs to be removed with something stronger than glass cleaner. The latter is especially irritating.
  • they would not swap usb connectors – we wanted two lighting cable for iPhone. I know it is only $14, but this is a no cost thing to address at delivery. Each delivery center should have a big box of each type and ask the new owner what they want.
  • no swag of any kind (e.g., they should consider providing a holder for the credit/valet card)
  • discouraged us from getting lug nut covers and center caps to covert the alloy wheels under the aero caps. They say we wouldn’t be able to remount the aero covers without removing the wheels, which apparently is not true. A conversion kit should be included with each car ordered with Aero wheels.
  • they didn’t even have bottled water in the waiting area refrigerator (we had a 10:30 am appointment). I know, this seems trivial but everything counts when trying to impress a new customer.
What is not different between the S and the 3 but should have been? The front trunk closing process is still dumb for what is supposed to be a mass market car. The process of gently lowering the hood, placing two hands on each side of the Tesla emblem, and pushing down gently but firmly with your palms is ridiculous. New owners will be more than mildly upset when they dent the hood of their new model 3.

In closing. I re-read this and it sounds more negative than I feel about the car overall. As I said at the beginning of this post, this is the best car I’ve owned and I’ve owned a lot of interesting cars. Mostly, I want readers of this forum to hear yet another perspective on the pros and cons of Model 3. After reading a lot of perspectives, one really begins to figure out what to expect.

I also want Tesla to succeed. They’ve designed and built another amazing car, but if and when the auto industry gets serious about competing, there will be other choices. The faster Tesla addresses these mostly minor shortcomings, the faster Tesla will become a viable long term (and perhaps even dominant) player in the auto industry.

Thanks for reading this rather long post!
 

kirk8500

Member
Feb 1, 2018
18
26
USA
I'm not a Model S owner, but I did have one for a bought a week while my Model 3 was in for service. I agree, big picture, with everything you say.

One of my conclusions is that I think Tesla will have to do an interior refresh of Model S fairly soon; Model 3 is simply a lot more modern, and the 'cleanness' of the interior is something I quickly adapted to and found jarring when switching to the S. If I were in the market for a Model S, I would definitely be waiting until the inevitable interior upgrade to either buy the new version, or a used Model S at a lower price. I find it odd that it doesn't seem like people are expecting a Model S refresh soon.

As far as the ride and handling, there I think it's more about individual preference. Model 3 drives more like a sports car. The steering is tight, the brakes are crisp, and you feel the road. Model S drives in a more 'luxurious' way which may appeal to some drivers. I personally prefer the 3, but I can imagine others far preferring the S.
 

Zaphod

Galaxy President (former)
Dec 10, 2015
2,160
1,996
Austin, TX
  • discouraged us from getting lug nut covers and center caps to covert the alloy wheels under the aero caps. They say we wouldn’t be able to remount the aero covers without removing the wheels, which apparently is not true. A conversion kit should be included with each car ordered with Aero wheels.
That is the most ridiculous thing I've heard in a while. That is definitely not true. Just another example of some Tesla employees just making up stuff.

Also are the outer door handles really not that intuitive? I've used them and make perfect sense to me. Even with "normal" door handles, doesn't one use their left hand on the driver side and right hand on the passenger side? Would seem awkward not to.
 

nutts1

Member
Dec 28, 2017
37
83
New Jersey
I took delivery this afternoon of my new Model 3, Vin # 3813, in Springfield NJ. I also own a 2015 70D Model S. I've driven it about 60 miles on the trip home. I won't give as in-depth an evaluation as the one above but do have some very preliminary initial impressions.

The delivery process went off without a hitch. The vehicle was ready to go when I walked into the building. Fit and finish were very good with no gaps in the panels and no smudges. Paint (Pearl White) was excellent and the delivery specialist said it was perhaps the best they had seen come through. Phones paired immediately for me, my wife and my granddaughter. As expressed above, they would not give me a second lightning connector, and in fact, had not installed the second connector at all. They had no spare connectors in stock and I will have to purchase online. I also tried to purchase a tire inflation kit but that will have to be ordered online as well.

I like the interior better than my Model S. It is roomier with easier entry and exit. The glass roof gave it a much more spacious feel and the tinting seems more than adequate. It was a bright, sunny afternoon and there was no glare through the roof. The sound is much better and I quickly grew to like the screen interface. A/C was also superior, with better airflow. Outside temp was 28 degrees and I didn't notice any cold spots.

The drive is where I was most surprised. It feels much quicker than my Model S. Both in acceleration and handling. I had to hit the accelerator to merge with traffic coming out of the Service Center and it startled me. There was a little bit of salt and sand on the street and the car fishtailed just a bit. I have found it impossible to spin a tire in my AWD Model S but the lighter car with RWD showed me it will spin tires quite easily. I agree with the assessment above that the drive train seems quieter in the M3 but I also found the road noise to be quite a bit higher at highway speeds. I began the drive with steering in the normal mode but changed it to the comfort setting about 30 miles into the drive, just personal preference. The handling became more second nature after about 15 minutes of driving. The autopilot became active right at the 50-mile point.

To sum it all up, I am very happy with my new Model 3. While I still prefer the ride and handling of my S better, I have a definite preference for the interior of the 3. My wife will be the primary driver of one of the vehicles and I the other. She has told me I can have my pick. At this point, I'm not sure what my choice will be.
 

DanH

Member
Dec 23, 2017
174
220
CA
I've been looking at Audi A5 Sport Back. It's pretty tempting. The price point is very similar to the 3.
I guess what's holding me back is I want to own an EV, and I really like the 3's minimalist interior.
I guess waiting for another month or two for my turn to configure shouldn't be too bad. Thanks for the post!
 

insaneoctane

Active Member
Apr 6, 2016
3,765
9,054
Southern California
@RBowen , fantastic and well written summary. I appreciate your points and even as a non-owner, agree with many of them. Here's just a copule: Things like "A conversion kit should be included with each car ordered with Aero wheels.". I *SO* agree, especially since I will be taking them off during pickup. Also, "Add option to see energy graphs (similar to model S software)"....I've already tweeted Elon hoping to get a "coming soon" reply.
Thanks again.
 

jomo25

Active Member
Mar 16, 2012
2,105
227
Scottsdale, AZ
So is there a way (or can someone come up with a way) to prevent passengers from using the ‘wrong’ way (handles) to exit the car? I dont have mine yet, but plan to look into this. The sight/sound of the doors being opened without the window going slightly down grates one tremendously!
 
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gregincal

Active Member
Oct 26, 2012
3,776
2,362
Santa Cruz, CA
Also are the outer door handles really not that intuitive? I've used them and make perfect sense to me. Even with "normal" door handles, doesn't one use their left hand on the driver side and right hand on the passenger side? Would seem awkward not to.

Yeah, I don't get the door handle thing either. In any car I've ever gotten into I open the driver's door with my left hand and the passenger door with my right hand. Opening the drivers door with your right hand would be really awkward. Perhaps because you are using your thumb and hand differently people notice which hand they are using more than they would otherwise.
 
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dragoljub

Member
Feb 16, 2017
353
599
Los Altos, CA
Agree with everything you said espically about road noise being too high for an electric. It’s mostly noticeable on highway.

My #2 complaint would be slightly too stiff suspension on 19s.

When dual motor and air suspension comes out we are getting very close to perfection.
 
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dragoljub

Member
Feb 16, 2017
353
599
Los Altos, CA
What’s better about Model 3? Wipers.

One thing I noticed right away was the Model 3 wipers sweep water all the way to the left A piller totally clearing your field of view. Coming back to S90D with 2 inch water/dirt next to A pillers is disappointing.
 
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ForeverFree

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Jul 9, 2015
606
1,384
Sherman Oaks, CA
I've been looking at Audi A5 Sport Back. It's pretty tempting. The price point is very similar to the 3.
I guess what's holding me back is I want to own an EV, and I really like the 3's minimalist interior.
I guess waiting for another month or two for my turn to configure shouldn't be too bad. Thanks for the post!


As someone who had, and loved, an Audi S4 and S5, I’d say it’s no contest, get the Tesla.

We have an S and a 3 and love them both.

A couple Christmases ago, we rented an A4 from Silvercar, and it was like going back ten years from our Tesla.
 

Az_Rael

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Jan 26, 2016
5,654
8,944
Palmdale, CA
Subjectively, I’ve had to intervene far more often than with AP1 in my S 75D.

One thing I have noticed and I am not sure if it’s a AP2 thing or a Model 3 thing, but disengaging autosteer with the steering wheel (e.g. when correcting the car’s track during a curve in the road), the steering has a much harder “release” than our AP 1. Enough that it is almost impossible to not get a fairly hard jerk after autosteer gives up fighting you for control. AP1 gave up easier, so you could exit autosteer that way if needed without much jerking, but exiting autosteer on AP2 at freeway speeds feels almost unsafe.

I have been resorting to using the brakes or the stalk instead, which forces me out of TACC too.
 

suwaneedad

Member
Dec 11, 2016
921
1,158
Atlanta
Please note that all of the comments below are my subjective opinion based on the first several hundred miles of ownership. My 2018 Model 3 VIN is 39xx. I’m located in San Diego. My other cars are a 2016 refreshed Model S 75D with AP1 and a 2016 Volt. I’m on the list for a second Model 3. The Volt and the Model S will go.

Overall first reaction: this is the best car I’ve ever owned including Tesla Model S (2), BMW 3-series (3), Audi, Porsche (3), Jaguar E-type (3), Lexus, Volt, Fiat 500E, Mini Cooper S, Miata, etc. Overall, as others have said, it feels like living in the future – and that future is good!

Fit and Finish: Generally good and better than the two Model S’s I’ve owned. The biggest flaw I’ve noticed is that the hood is not quite flush with the fenders about half-way up toward the windshield; it is flush at the front of the car and back toward the windshield. (For perspective, my 2016 S had loose weather stripping in multiple places, a loose door panel, etc. My 2013 S has some poor panel alignments and a few rattles.)

Handling: more taut, more nimble, and way more fun than my model S 75D. More like an older 3 series BMW with sport suspension. It is responsive without being ‘fidgety’ on the freeway like my mini cooper S or my miata.

Ride: firm but rarely harsh. Again, more like a sports sedan with a sport suspension. Lowering the air pressure from 49 psi (as delivered) to 45 psi (recommended on the driver’s door pillar) did not make a noticeable difference. Have not tried anything lower. If you want a more comfortable ride, you may need an S with air suspension.

Performance: Feels quick and about the same as my S 75D. After several years of driving electric cars, I still appreciate the fun of instant torque. See above for handling.

Interior: airy, minimalistic, comfortable and mostly more functional. Feels almost as spacious as my S with panoramic sunroof. The 3 is more functional given placement of cup holders, coat hooks, usb ports, door storage, lighted vanity mirrors, etc. I really like the ability to control the airflow. The cloth (non-Alcantra) headliner seems nice enough, but I much prefer the black Alcantra material I have in my S; this will likely appear in a future year’s upgrade package. One negative is the piano black finish on the console. It catches dust and fingerprints and will scratch easily. (I will be wrapping mine when I figure out what finish to choose.) Tesla should switch console materials asap.

Exterior J-shaped door handles are cool looking but awkward. For smooth one-hand operation, you have to approach the handle from the correct side using the correct hand. (I cannot believe I am writing this. It reminds me of Apple telling users they were holding their iPhone incorrectly!) For the Driver’s side, use your left hand standing to the rear side of the handle. Push with your thumb and grab the handle that extends out with your fingers. For the Passenger side, use your right thumb and fingers standing to the rear side of the handle. You will get used to it, but your new passengers will not. It will make them feel stupid, which is not good.

Interior push-button door release is elegant, but your passengers are more likely to use the manual release, which does not automatically lower the window. It will make you and your passenger feel stupid when you tell them how to open the door correctly. Again – cool but not good.

Audio: To my untrained ear, the sound system in the Model 3 is as good or better than the premium system in my S 75D.

Noise: the drive train much quieter than my S 75D, as there is no continuous varying motor whine that Tesla service told me was “normal.” At speed, the interior feels about as quiet as my S, which is okay but far from state-of-the-art. In my opinion, there is still too much road and wind noise. Tesla should consider offering a “quiet” package results in the quietest interior in the industry. Starting with a quiet drive train is a huge competitive advantage that Tesla does not completely take advantage of.

Controls and interface: even knowing how an S operates, there is a significant learning curve. Some (perhaps many) interface issues can be improved with software. My current top requests include:
  • Control AP speed from the steering wheel. I use the stalk on my S frequently to adjust the AP speed.
  • Control wipers from the steering wheel.
  • Option to move navigation’s list of distances and turns to left hand side of navigation display (from the current far right-hand side)
  • Improve quality of view from backup camera (to make it similar to model S).
  • Add option to see energy graphs (similar to model S software)
AP 2.5 vs AP 1. Going straight in your lane on a freeway, there may be a bit less ‘squirming.’ On a modestly tight curve, Model 3 AP 2.5 feels scary like it might cross the center line. Subjectively, I’ve had to intervene far more often than with AP1 in my S 75D. In lanes that vary in width, the car seeks the center of the lane, which can result in a ‘weird’ track that is not what one would do driving manually. Using the turn signal to move to an adjacent lane causes a far more abrupt move than under AP1. Overall, sadly, it feels like AP2.5 on Model 3 still has not caught up with AP1 on Model S. Arguably, AP in its current state is most useful in stop and go rush traffic. Given Tesla’s obvious head start toward autonomous driving and all of the data that Tesla has collected, why has Tesla’s AP not improved at a faster rate?

Lane departure warning is totally irritating on winding roads, as it will not allow you to cross the apex of a turn without getting the vibrating lane departure warning. I had to turn it off. (Note that this may be no different than on the S, but it was more noticeable to me.) I’d like an option to have lane departure warning active when on freeways and off otherwise.

Phone as a key. With one potentially big exception, it has worked well for me. Note that I turned off “unlock as you walk up” because you will continually be unlocking your model 3 if you work in your garage. If your garage is close to your house, it may continually unlock the car as you walk around inside with your phone. With “auto-lock as you walk up” turned off, you unlock by touching a door handle or by opening the exterior trunk release button. What you cannot do is open the front trunk (the frunk) without the huge hassle of getting out your phone, finding the Tesla app, waiting for it to find your car, clicking on controls, and finally clicking on open frunk. Those that want to actively use their frunk need to lobby Tesla to make an optional fob.

Delivery process. (Warning: this is even more anecdotal than the discussion about the car.) Our delivery specialist was pleasant enough and patient, but it was not a high-end experience:
  • the car was not properly prepared. It had to been sent back to buff out fine scratches on the hood. They left polishing compound around the door handles and between some panels. The windshield still has something on it that needs to be removed with something stronger than glass cleaner. The latter is especially irritating.
  • they would not swap usb connectors – we wanted two lighting cable for iPhone. I know it is only $14, but this is a no cost thing to address at delivery. Each delivery center should have a big box of each type and ask the new owner what they want.
  • no swag of any kind (e.g., they should consider providing a holder for the credit/valet card)
  • discouraged us from getting lug nut covers and center caps to covert the alloy wheels under the aero caps. They say we wouldn’t be able to remount the aero covers without removing the wheels, which apparently is not true. A conversion kit should be included with each car ordered with Aero wheels.
  • they didn’t even have bottled water in the waiting area refrigerator (we had a 10:30 am appointment). I know, this seems trivial but everything counts when trying to impress a new customer.
What is not different between the S and the 3 but should have been? The front trunk closing process is still dumb for what is supposed to be a mass market car. The process of gently lowering the hood, placing two hands on each side of the Tesla emblem, and pushing down gently but firmly with your palms is ridiculous. New owners will be more than mildly upset when they dent the hood of their new model 3.

In closing. I re-read this and it sounds more negative than I feel about the car overall. As I said at the beginning of this post, this is the best car I’ve owned and I’ve owned a lot of interesting cars. Mostly, I want readers of this forum to hear yet another perspective on the pros and cons of Model 3. After reading a lot of perspectives, one really begins to figure out what to expect.

I also want Tesla to succeed. They’ve designed and built another amazing car, but if and when the auto industry gets serious about competing, there will be other choices. The faster Tesla addresses these mostly minor shortcomings, the faster Tesla will become a viable long term (and perhaps even dominant) player in the auto industry.

Thanks for reading this rather long post!
When you have a chance, would you mind posting a picture with the aero covers off; would love to see it. I'm wrestling with silver, or midnight silver, in both cases without the aeros (and with the Tesla center caps and lug nut covers. I know there are plenty of these images already on the forum, but always love to see more. Each differs (lighting, angles). Thanks for the terrific review!
 

roblab

Active Member
Jul 15, 2008
3,711
3,219
Angwin (Napa Valley) CA
Thanks for sharing your learning.

Have to say, we just spent too much time while driving in the dark trying to figure out the air/heat/AC stuff and finally gave up. Drove home with "fan noise" that wasn't there when we started the drive, but fan was turned off. We're still learning, probably slower than some. Nearing 1000 miles, probably pass it tomorrow.

Good to know about the Phone as Key. I've spent many minutes in the garage, next to the S which wants to connect, too, like it's being left out, while I tried one thing and another.
 

RCWtristan

Member
Dec 14, 2017
47
64
Easton. MD
What’s better about Model 3? Wipers.

One thing I noticed right away was the Model 3 wipers sweep water all the way to the left A piller totally clearing your field of view. Coming back to S90D with 2 inch water/dirt next to A pillers is disappointing.
Dragoljub - That's an adjustable item. My S (2 months old) wasn't getting enough of a sweep on the driver's side. A"traveling" Tesla service guy popped off my wiper arm from its shaft and moved it slightly, then bolted it back down to make an almost-clean sweep.
 

RBowen

Member
Jun 14, 2016
109
308
San Diego
Thanks for all of the nice comments above. This post is a follow up on AP2 in the model 3.

First, my comments on the model 3's AP in my original post above are strictly limited to the model 3. AP2 is a model S may be fine. From our experience to date, AP2 needs a lot of work in the model 3. We went for a mostly interstate 8 freeway ride in the model 3 today, and I eventually had to turn AP off because my usually tolerant spouse complained about the "car-sickness inducing lurching." When a car would pull out of our lane our model 3 on AP lurches ahead to fill the gap up to the set speed limit. When a car pulled in front of us from another lane, AP2 seems to overreact and slows down quickly -- at least compared to the relatively smooth transitions in our model S with AP1. I'm sure this will be fixed at some point, but it is a disappointment that AP2 on the 3 is so much worse than AP1 on the S. If the characteristics of AP2 extend to the model S, I now better understand why so many model S owners are upset.
 
Last edited:

RBowen

Member
Jun 14, 2016
109
308
San Diego
This post is a follow up on the exterior door handles. I agree with those above who said it is natural to use one's left hand on the driver's side door handles and the right hand on the passenger side door handles. However, on many (perhaps most) cars including the model S, it doesn't matter that much. On an S, you just need to pull the handle out a little, it activates the electronic opener and the door opens a bit. One can easily do this one-handed or even one-fingered using either hand.

Door opening is not as straight forward on the 3. One cannot open the door with one finger (or at least I don't know how). To open it one-handed, there are two parts to the process -- a push with the correct thumb and a pull with the remaining fingers. Of course, as the owner, you'll quickly get used to the routine. But some people who approach the car for the first time are befuddled -- thus the occasional need to instruct or demonstrate. Again, not a huge deal -- but certainly a personality quirk of model 3.
 
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RCWtristan

Member
Dec 14, 2017
47
64
Easton. MD
Thanks for all of the nice comments above. This post is a follow up on AP2 in the model 3.

First, my comments on the model 3's AP in my original post above are strictly limited to the model 3. AP2 is a model S may be fine. From our experience to date, AP2 needs a lot of work in the model 3. We went for a mostly interstate 8 freeway ride in the model 3 today, and I eventually had to turn AP off because my usually tolerant spouse complained about the "car-sickness inducing lurching." When a car would pull out of our lane our model 3 on AP lurches ahead to fill the gap up to the set speed limit. When a car pulled in front of us from another lane, AP2 seems to overreact and slows down quickly -- at least compared to the relatively smooth transitions in our model S with AP1. I'm sure this will be fixed at some point, but it is a disappointment that AP2 on the 3 is so much worse than AP1 on the S. If the characteristics of AP2 extend to the model S, I now better understand why so many model S owners are upset.
Just for the record, I think the AP software on Model 3 is actually AP2.5, not 2.0 (and according to my tech guy who scrolled through diagnostic screens on my two month old "S" this week, that is what is now going in the Ss currently and is in mine). But from your comments it appears that the two different cars, the S and the new 3s, are not reacting the same as each other.
 

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