Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • The final cut of TMC Podcast #21 is available now. We covered the recent wide release of FSD Beta and shared our experiences. We also discussed the best times to charge and Tesla's official CCS adapter. You can watch it on YouTube.

Firsthand comparison from an owner of both, between the Rivian SUV and Tesla Model X. The only EV 7-seater SUV's available.

Now that we have the details about the Rivian SUV, seems only fair to compare it to the only other 7-seater all EV SUV. Still two different vehicles. Much like the F-150 and the Rivian Truck. Two different purposes, but this as close as we get.

Originally, thought Rivian’s new price point was pushing too far. But, when I start to itemize what you get with the Rivian, starts to look like a pretty fair deal.

Tesla has been in a class of ONE for nearly a decade. Now, there are finally some competitors putting up respectable alternatives.

Tesla clearly wins by a country mile when it comes to charging infrastructure. If you want to road trip an EV on a regular basis, then there’s really no comparison. Tesla’s auto-pilot is miles ahead of what Rivian is offering. But, to be fair, am comparing pricing of the Tesla without adding the FSD option. Basic auto-pilot is more competitive to Rivian’s “Driver+” system. Tesla still wins in this department as it doesn’t require mapped roads to work, but is at least somewhat more competitive.

On the other hand, if you want an off-road capable SUV, then the Rivian pretty much stands in its own category. It is the only truly off-road capable Electric SUV on the market.

Sure, there is the Audi E-Tron, Jaguar I-Pace and Mercedes is coming out with one too. BMW’s iX offers competitive range. Mercedes will as well. But, neither of those are three row SUV’s. So, for a family seeking a people mover, but want to be EV only, the only two options at this point are the Rivian and Tesla Model X or Model Y. The Model Y however, simply doesn’t compare to the Model X or Rivian in terms of overall build quality. It’s also a much smaller vehicle.

The Mercedes and BMW are more competitively priced to the Tesla, all three are more expensive than the Rivian. I thought the Rivian was a bit over-priced after their big price hike. But, looking at the options out there, it’s really not unreasonably priced, when you take a closer look at what you really get.

Especially when directly considering what features each has. Again, different vehicles and will depend on the needs of each particular buyer. The Tesla wins hands down on efficiency, charging network and development of its UI. Rivian is mostly a knock-off of earlier model Tesla’s. It will close the gap in time, but for now, Tesla certainly offers much more tech. How much of that tech people actually use? That’s a different question. I always liked that my car could play video games, watch movies, fart, etc, etc, but over time, realized I never actually used any of these features. They became more party tricks that were cool to showoff, but in practice, didn’t really benefit me.

The Audi & Jaguar are priced lower than the Rivian by roughly $10,000, but both only offer around 220 miles in terms of range. Both are smaller SUV's with only two rows of seating. The battery size alone is enough to account for a $10,000 variance. As noted, the Mercedes and BMW offer more competitive ranges to the Rivian and Model X and are more comparably priced to the Model X. Both do offer more luxury. But again, are only 2 row SUV’s.

Having now owned a Rivian, many Tesla’s, I can say with absolute certainty that Rivian’s quality level is more on par with a Model X than it is to a Model Y. For the sake of argument, assuming you want / need a 3-row SUV capable of seating 7 passengers and only want an all-electric Vehicle, which makes more sense when factoring in everything that each has to offer?

The Tesla is similar in length, but narrower.
Both have air suspensions, but the Rivian's is far more adjustable with up to 8 inches of travel.
The Tesla tech is miles ahead of where the Rivian is currently at.
Tesla's charging network is thousands of miles ahead. Just can’t compare to Tesla’s supercharging network.
Tesla has a slight range advantage at 329 miles for the Long Range version. 316 for the Rivian.

Tesla is far more efficient. It achieves its range on a 100 kWh battery versus Rivian doing so with a 135 kWh battery. The variance being, it doesn’t have to be shaped like a bubble to be aerodynamic. At least it’s not a Hummer with a 200 kWh battery!

Obviously Tesla is more established. More service centers. Etc. But, they too were a start-up company 10 years ago. So, giving Rivian a pass. To their credit, they’re one of the first, start from scratch companies to produce a viable EV since Tesla did it 10 years ago (not counting the Roadster before it).
Rivian has far superior "frunk" space and usability with the auto open-close feature vs Tesla's delicate Frunk that you have to carefully close with two hands in the right spot so you don't bend the hood. I never used my Tesla frunk for this reason. The Rivian’s is like having an actual trunk.
Rivian's split tailgate feature is a nice plus as well. Gives you a place to sit if you want it.
Tesla has the Falcon Wing Doors. A plus for some, a deterrent for others. I went with the Model S specifically because the thought of waiting for those doors every time I need to quickly grab something from the back seat was a huge turn off. Still are as I do commonly grab stuff from the back seat.
The Rivian feels richer inside than a Tesla. But, this is more a matter of personal preference. Personally, I am not a fan of the extreme minimalism. I liked the pre-refresh Model S because it was a good blend between today and yesterday Still having driver friendly functions with the advancement of tomorrow. Rivian went that route while Tesla took the Model S in a different, more Model 3 like route. Again, personal tastes will dictate which is better.

Tesla’s center console storage space is much appreciated.

Tesla still has a glove box. Again, much appreciated.

Rivian has an air compressor. Will be much appreciated if I get a flat on a road trip again.

Rivian has 110v power outlets, which do come in quite handy

Rivian has a camp speaker. (probably will never use it)

Rivian has a built-in flashlight. (cool little thing that comes in handy)


The Rivian accelerates 0-60 in 3.1 seconds. Tesla Long Range does 0-60 in 3.8 seconds.
The Rivian offers a compact spare tire. Tesla offers roadside assistance. Great if you don't mind waiting and if you're within their coverage area. Sucks badly if you're not. I know from experience.

Rivian has a blinker stalk.

Rivian has a shifter stalk

Rivian has a horn button where you expect it to be

Rivian has a full steering wheel.

Rivian includes a portable charger. Tesla charges you $200 for one.

All items I took for granted but realize how much I appreciate the existence of. At least for my preferences. Likewise, I appreciate the glovebox and center console storage Tesla has. For those going to and from work, these items may not stand out as much of an issue. For someone like me that uses the vehicle for work and is in and out 10 times a day, I really appreciate the simple driver/user friendly functions.

Those are my bullet points.
The Rivian, at today's pricing with typical options is $95,000.
The Tesla, at today's pricing, is $130,000. Without adding FSD (keeping it more comparable to Rivian’s system). Tesla wins in this category by at least having the option for more, but comes at a cost of $12,000.

If you want to beat the Rivian in acceleration, for another $18,000, you can get the bigger motor in the Tesla. That's exactly all you get for $18,000 as nothing else is included for that $18,000 besides quicker acceleration.

For those that think the Model Y is comparable. The Model Y performance is 3.5 0-60, $70,000 and you can only get 5 seats at 303 miles of range. Have to “downgrade” to the Long Range Version if you want 7 seats. 0-60 then jumps way up to 4.8 seconds. But, then you have to pony up $5,000 to upgrade the wheels and get the third row (to be comparable with Rivian’s offerings). So the slower long range version then goes up to $71,000. It's overall, much smaller, MUCH narrower than the Rivian or X. Compared to the Rivian or Model X, quality of a Model Y or 3 just doesn’t compare to a Model S or X. Much less sound-proofing. Interior has ZERO "Luxury". As bare minimum as you can get. I had a Model 3 for 2 months and hated it. Was in heaven when I went back to a Model S. Everyone that got in it, said "There's nothing in here!" You lose the driver info screen behind the steering wheel. They do at least give you a full steering wheel in the Model Y! LOL It has virtually identical range to the Rivian. You lose the Falcon Wing Doors and the Frunk is pretty much useless by comparison. Model Y has stiff coil springs (no air suspension). This was one of the HUGE reasons why I wanted a Model S again. The 2019 and beyond Model S suspension is incredible. Having now experienced Rivian’s air suspension, it is quite competitive. I have the truck, but the ride quality is extremely good.

Again, the battery size variance alone warrants a chunk of the extra money for the Model X or Rivian. The quality level, clearly varies, noting that Tesla themselves charge nearly $60,000 more for the Model X versus the Model Y. Some of that is “because we can” pricing, but much of it is because the Model X is designed to be a premium vehicle while the Model 3/Y are intended to be the cheaper offerings. Compared to a Model X, it feels far cheaper (because it is) and feels far smaller. As noted, having now experienced both, Rivian’s solidity, sound proofing and overall quality is more on par with the Model S & X offerings.

The above, is based on personal experience having owned versions of each of these vehicles.

When I start to itemize everything out, unless you're someone that does a lot of road tripping where the Tesla charging network is miles ahead and someone that buys their cars to watch videos and play video games, the Rivian seems to offer quite a bit for the money. For those that don’t road trip that often and for those that pass on Full Self Driving and/or the re-introduced Enhanced Auto Pilot, even with Rivian’s recent 20% price hike, when compared to the only other 7-seater EV SUV, for $35,000 less, seems to stand up pretty well.

I tried to be fairly unbiased in my comparison. Admittedly, I’m not a fan of Tesla’s new interior and functionality, nor the lack of a full steering wheel. But, even ignoring my personal opinions regarding this and being that I do little road tripping and rarely use the supercharger network, combined with pretty only using Autopilot to maintain speed and lane centering on the freeway, for my personal use case, some of Tesla’s big advantages where it is clearly superior, are areas that I personally don’t really benefit from. Again, depends on your personal needs and use. Standing on the remaining items and giving equal consideration to the interior styling and layout, for $35,000 less, the Rivian looks like a pretty solid offering.

Rivian will certainly experience some growing pains, but after 9 years with a Tesla, they’re still experiencing them too. Taking a month to get me in for service is not the most appealing. Rivian, for now, is very responsive, just like Tesla used to be in the early days. Both offer mobile service. Rivian still answers the phone so you can call to get quick questions answered rather than having to open a service ticket and wait for a reply. With Tesla, you have to do everything via the app. With Rivian, they’re willing to talk to you to possibly solve issues over the phone rather than having to open a service ticket and wait a week or two to get a reply. Probably will change, as Tesla did over time. But for now, I appreciate Rivian’s eagerness to make things right ASAP, just as Tesla did in their early days.

Anything I’m missing?
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
8,272
7,775
MA, NH
Seems like you cherry picked the worst things of PreRefresh vs Refresh. For example you take the Range of PreRefresh X and the Price of the Refresh.

Either compare the Pre-Refresh or the Refresh (not the worst of both).

And since you apparently down own a Refresh, why bring up all the things you think are a neggtive without actually owning one first hand.
Wasn't that the subject line of "owning both"?
 

gaswalla

Model S,3,X.. CT with Austin delivery
Sep 23, 2012
3,877
4,784
San Diego
isn't the RIvian SUV significantly larger on the inside? Doesn't it use more energy per mile than the X?
I love the Rivian, and own an X... I see them as each in a different niche.
apologies if these points are in your dissertation - just not enough time to read pages and pages of opinion unless it's from a judge
 
  • Like
Reactions: DrGriz
Seems like you cherry picked the worst things of PreRefresh vs Refresh. For example you take the Range of PreRefresh X and the Price of the Refresh.

Either compare the Pre-Refresh or the Refresh (not the worst of both).

And since you apparently down own a Refresh, why bring up all the things you think are a neggtive without actually owning one first hand.
Wasn't that the subject line of "owning both"?
What am I not comparing? This is comparing the current Model X to the Rivian. Not the pre-refresh. So not sure where you're thinking I mixed them up? And yes, I have experienced both in depth. No, did not own a refresh model, but have driven them plenty enough to know that it wasn't for me, hence why for the first time in 9 years, I don't own a Tesla. I made some references to personal preferences of the pre-refresh features. But, wasn't being "negative", simply comparing actual differences and noting when those differences were personal preference versus simply being factual variances. The details are compared to today's Model X offering, with 22" wheels and 7 seats. Don't take it personal. Simply a comparison of the only two 7-seater EV SUV's available at this time and what each one offers, noting the positives and negatives of BOTH vehicles. Will say, the Tesla crowd is SO much more sensitive than the crowds for other vehicles. Just because the Tesla isn't the best at one particular item doesn't mean it's bad. It's OK to be fair and unbiased when considering how a Tesla compares to other alternatives. This crowd needs to relax and enjoy life. You're fortunate enough to own a Tesla, life can't be that bad. Enjoy it.

I do have to say, as I fade away from these forums, I certainly won't miss the insta-replies that come through on the Tesla sites. The second they hint there might be something negative about the Tesla, even when there really isn't, they stop reading a post their defensive replies. People are far more friendly, relaxed and constructively interactive on basically every other site than the Tesla sites. I know, not everyone on these sites are that way, just the ones that appear to monitor it and respond instantly. Two replies here, both with some type of sarcasm right off the bat. Simply posting a detailed review for those interested in hearing from someone that has experience with both vehicles. Don't want to read it, don't read it.
 
Last edited:

RoBoRaT

Active Member
Nov 22, 2018
1,905
1,900
NorthSoCal
@kizamybute'
Thanks for the detailed comparison.

I have owned Model 3s and Ys, both LR and P version, and 7 seater Y too.
Totaled a Raven 6 seater X in 2020 that MYP replaced. Have not owned an S.

I still long for a 6 or 7 seater EV SUV for my family of 5 with a dog, that has better leg room than the 3rd row off of a LR Model Y. I have ordered a LR X in July 2021 that will replace our MYP. I reserved an R1S (at pre hike price) that will likely replace the LR X for better off-road ability.

Keep them pointers coming. I appreciate them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: kizamybute'

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
8,272
7,775
MA, NH
What am I not comparing? This is comparing the current Model X to the Rivian. Not the pre-refresh. So not sure where you're thinking I mixed them up? And yes, I have experienced both in depth. No, did not own a refresh model, but have driven them plenty enough to know that it wasn't for me, hence why for the first time in 9 years, I don't own a Tesla. I made some references to personal preferences of the pre-refresh features. But, wasn't being "negative", simply comparing actual differences and noting when those differences were personal preference versus simply being factual variances. The details are compared to today's Model X offering, with 22" wheels and 7 seats. Don't take it personal. Simply a comparison of the only two 7-seater EV SUV's available at this time and what each one offers, noting the positives and negatives of BOTH vehicles. Will say, the Tesla crowd is SO much more sensitive than the crowds for other vehicles. Just because the Tesla isn't the best at one particular item doesn't mean it's bad. It's OK to be fair and unbiased when considering how a Tesla compares to other alternatives. This crowd needs to relax and enjoy life. You're fortunate enough to own a Tesla, life can't be that bad. Enjoy it.

I do have to say, as I fade away from these forums, I certainly won't miss the insta-replies that come through on the Tesla sites. The second they hint there might be something negative about the Tesla, even when there really isn't, they stop reading a post their defensive replies. People are far more friendly, relaxed and constructively interactive on basically every other site than the Tesla sites. I know, not everyone on these sites are that way, just the ones that appear to monitor it and respond instantly. Two replies here, both with some type of sarcasm right off the bat. Simply posting a detailed review for those interested in hearing from someone that has experience with both vehicles. Don't want to read it, don't read it.

Rivian is cool.
How you go about comparing it is a total mess and heavily biased.

Enjoy.
 
Rivian is cool.
How you go about comparing it is a total mess and heavily biased.

Enjoy.
Heavily biased in what way? Genuinely curious? I noted which items were "personal preferences". Beyond that, point out the Tesla's many strengths and the Rivian's many strengths. The only conclusion I came to was that, when stacking them up against each other, the Rivian doesn't appear to be a bad deal.

Yes, I have a personal dislike for Tesla's Yoke, lack of stalks, lack of a standard horn button, lack of a shifter, etc. That is a "personal preference", although, one shared by many. In all, the Tesla excels far better in some things while the Rivian excels in other aspects. Again, noting that they are two different vehicles, comparable primarily because they are both 7-seater "suv's". One is designed to be an adventure vehicle and off-road capable, the other is designed to be an efficient road traveler. Depending on your personal needs, one is far better than the other. The Tesla for some. The Rivian for others. For those in the middle, then comes down to features, appeal, each person's own personal opinion on which best fits them and the $35,000 price tag difference.
 
They are different animals.
Absolutely. No doubt.

Much like the Rivian Truck versus the Ford F-150 Lightning. Both EV trucks, but very different. Yet, are the only two EV Trucks on the market at this time. So, natural to "try" to compare them.

Same is true of the Dad that has 5 kids, his wife still hasn't left him, he refuses to drive an ICE vehicle and needs a 7 seater EV SUV. For that guy, these are currently the only two options available.
 
Same is true of the Dad that has 5 kids, his wife still hasn't left him, he refuses to drive an ICE vehicle and needs a 7 seater EV SUV. For that guy, these are currently the only two options available.

Oddly... specific. :)

I am very intrigued with the R1S. On more than one occasion, I've almost clicked on the reserve button. Ultimately right now, the Model X is what will help me the most, specifically the FWD and loading kids into car seats. I am intrigued by the R1S because we want to buy a travel trailer and the higher towing capacity of the R1S gives me more buffer/options. But that's a couple of years down the road. Thanks for the comparison.
 
  • Like
Reactions: electricar
Thank you! As a current model Y owner, I’m looking for a 7 seater EV to replace my wife’s BMW. It seems like the only two options today are the model X or Rivian R1S. I won’t get an X for two reasons: I don’t like the yoke and they have over priced the car: $132,900 for the 7 seat dual motor non-Plaid non-FSD model X is stupid expensive. Before Tesla shut down the X production in 2020, I was going to order a 7 seater for $82,000. I ended up getting the Y while the X was on hold since I needed a car, but the Y is a bit too small.
It sounds like the Rivian is much more reasonably priced for a larger SUV.
 
A few things I'll put in there. There's also under seat storage in the Rivian. It "kinda" makes up for the missing glovebox, although I would have preferred to see one still available. I like that with Tesla you can add a PIN to lock it as well. Hitch capacity - if you want to carry bikes/gear or such is a BIG difference. With the X, there's no ability to packrat it - the FWD just don't allow for a proper roof rack. Add in the vertical load capacity of 120 pounds because of the hitch design is ridiculous (albeit you can get an aftermarket hitch that will significantly improve on it). Even the Model Y does better at 160 pounds but still a lightweight comparatively. The X's 6 seater option could REALLY benefit with the ability to fold them flat for cargo as well as making them a touch wider for more comfort.

I'll say I'd prefer to stick with the stalks. The turn signals on the refresh X is the same location as the old controls for changing music - I'm still working through that issue. Nothing like going to change a song and putting on the right turn signal. I also wish they had put something more there to help feel for the turn signal as there's been a few times it's taken a couple of goes to get it to initiate. The one benefit is that instead of the triple turn signal for lane changes, Tesla's will keep the signal going until the lane change is complete - which I think is the right way to go. Swipe controls for direction are also hit or miss at times. I've done the swipe to put the car into reverse and it kinda acknowledges it but then keeps to the direction going forward. It's unclear whether it didn't like the length or speed of the swipe, but it doesn't help when in busy traffic trying to parallel park. It would also benefit from a tone change to differentiate between putting it in forward vs reverse. They've also got to put the horn back in the center - period. I think that the wiper controls are okay overall, however, it does mean that one has to look down at the screen to change the tempo. I'm okay with the yoke, but it's "fixing" something that wasn't really broken to begin with - just like the stalks. The voice commands are decent, and well, frankly I don't know them all, but it's a decent step up from a MCU1 constrained system.

The true catch point for Rivian and others is the charging infrastructure. That said, if indeed Tesla is looking to open their chargers across North America, then it's a moot point. I would also say, I would have far more confidence putting the Rivian off road than any Tesla. The X simply isn't built for true offroading and that's fine - it's more of a people mover than anything and gets that job done nicely.

I look forward to seeing greater variety in the EV SUV segment. It'll be a hard choice when my Rivian R1T shows up as to which one to keep (although I acknowledge that the 2 aren't truly comparable as much as the R1S to the X).
 
The true catch point for Rivian and others is the charging infrastructure.
Understood. If you take long distance trips with 7 people, you need to make sure you can charge along the way.
But I don't travel long distances much (my next trip in the Y is from NYC to Washington for a family party, and ABRP has the route covered).
But I do often have a full car of parents, especially on weekends. I hate taking my wife's BMW, But the 7 seat Y just wouldn't cut it for adults (the back row is too small).
 
Last edited:
Understood. If you take long distance trips with 7 people, you need to make sure you can charge along the way.
But I don't travel long distances much (my next trip in the Y is from NYC to Washington for a family party, and ABRP has the route covered).
But I do often have a full car of parents, especially on weekends. I hate taking my wife's BMW, But the 7 seat Y just wouldn't cut it for adults (the back row is too small).
3rd row on X is for small kids or very short people, 5'3". I cannot imagine 3rd row in Y.

I could not find legroom with R1S.
 
3rd row on X is for small kids or very short people, 5'3". I cannot imagine 3rd row in Y.

I could not find legroom with R1S.
It's pretty small too. They did say adults could fit, primarily because the roof doesn't drop down as it does on the Tesla's. But, likely that adults wouldn't want to be back there on any road trips. Good for kids or for adults going a short distance to dinner or something. But I think that's true of almost all 3rd row seating, with the exception of the largest SUV's on the plant, such as an extended Expedition, Escalade or Suburban. Any other options, are going to be cramped
 
It's pretty small too. They did say adults could fit, primarily because the roof doesn't drop down as it does on the Tesla's. But, likely that adults wouldn't want to be back there on any road trips. Good for kids or for adults going a short distance to dinner or something. But I think that's true of almost all 3rd row seating, with the exception of the largest SUV's on the plant, such as an extended Expedition, Escalade or Suburban. Any other options, are going to be cramped
Personally, I find the 3rd row okay on the X. If you're doing long distance with more than 5 people and comfort is paramount, then it's either a minivan or a van - SUVs just don't do it so well. If I just didn't hate Ford so much, the tall Transit would be a nice one - while sucking back gas like there's no tomorrow.
 
The Long Range/dual motor/whatever you want to call it refreshed Model X is significantly quicker than the Rivian quad motor in real life. Like half a second faster in the 1/4 (~11.2 to 11.7ish), and the topend is a LOT stronger on the Tesla (122+mph trap speed for the Model X, vs. 112-ish on the Rivian), so anything but a launch from a dig is not a close race. Which misses the point of the vehicles, but, yeah. You don't need a Plaid to lay waste to the Rivian in a drag race, and the fun part is, the Rivian owner will have hope for the first 330' before the Model X just vanishes, and we know from the Dark Knight Rises that false hope is the worst kind of torture ;)

Now do the same race on anything but smooth pavement and I'm sure the Rivian wins.
 
Last edited:
What am I not comparing? This is comparing the current Model X to the Rivian. Not the pre-refresh. So not sure where you're thinking I mixed them up? And yes, I have experienced both in depth. No, did not own a refresh model, but have driven them plenty enough to know that it wasn't for me, hence why for the first time in 9 years, I don't own a Tesla. I made some references to personal preferences of the pre-refresh features. But, wasn't being "negative", simply comparing actual differences and noting when those differences were personal preference versus simply being factual variances. The details are compared to today's Model X offering, with 22" wheels and 7 seats. Don't take it personal. Simply a comparison of the only two 7-seater EV SUV's available at this time and what each one offers, noting the positives and negatives of BOTH vehicles. Will say, the Tesla crowd is SO much more sensitive than the crowds for other vehicles. Just because the Tesla isn't the best at one particular item doesn't mean it's bad. It's OK to be fair and unbiased when considering how a Tesla compares to other alternatives. This crowd needs to relax and enjoy life. You're fortunate enough to own a Tesla, life can't be that bad. Enjoy it.

I do have to say, as I fade away from these forums, I certainly won't miss the insta-replies that come through on the Tesla sites. The second they hint there might be something negative about the Tesla, even when there really isn't, they stop reading a post their defensive replies. People are far more friendly, relaxed and constructively interactive on basically every other site than the Tesla sites. I know, not everyone on these sites are that way, just the ones that appear to monitor it and respond instantly. Two replies here, both with some type of sarcasm right off the bat. Simply posting a detailed review for those interested in hearing from someone that has experience with both vehicles. Don't want to read it, don't read it.
You're absolutely right. Many Tesla fans can be seriously sensitive and can't handle criticism of any sort; just visit the investment thread. And this is coming from a 10-year Tesla owner, fan, supporter, and owner of a yacht-load of TSLA.
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top